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Engine oil topic, again,,,,,


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#1 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 04:12 PM

This topic has been on before, and we all have our reasons for using a certain grade or type of oil. Was looking at one of my engines today for a project and noticed this on the engine. Seems you can use what ever you have on hand, is what I get out of it.  Noel

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#2 stiemmy ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 04:18 PM

Kinda reminds me of the old saying, "any oil is better than no oil". Cheers
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#3 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 04:30 PM

Put something in it for bobs sake

Seriously I was always told growing up SAE30 non detergent oil.

That's what I've always used. One of our k series Kohlers had thousands of hours on it before it died.

Edited by toomanytoys84, June 07, 2015 - 04:51 PM.

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#4 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 04:56 PM

I also think just having oil full is biggest deal. All that weight and viscosity is bunch of Bull!  30 weight works in most, winter or summer for me! hee! :smilewink:


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#5 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 05:09 PM

Very true about having it full. I check each time I use them. Full oil is not only for lubrication, but is for cooling also. Noel
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#6 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 07:58 PM

Anyone ever done oil sampling on a small engine? They sell those kits on eBay for like 15 dollars. I've played with the idea a few times

#7 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 08:06 PM

I just looked at a quart I picked up and it say SM on it -oh well it's going in anyway.

As said any oil is better than no oil.

But I have seen more than one person check the oil the  wrong way on older Kohler's ,they unscrew fill plug wipe and screw it back then unscrew it again to look at the stick---wrong way to do it and unnecessary work. 



#8 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 08:32 PM

I always shake my head (and then correct them) when I see someone pull a dipstick, look at it and shove it back in and go. On heavy equipment especially, that's not how it works.
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#9 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 09:29 PM

Anyone ever done oil sampling on a small engine? They sell those kits on eBay for like 15 dollars. I've played with the idea a few times


Oil sampling is used to extend oil drain intervals by monitoring what's in the engine oil. Heavy equipment and truck people use oil sampling to save money long term and to determine when a reman is needed. When you're running equipment that takes ten gallons or more to service, it is worthwhile. I personally wouldn't spend $15 to for an oil sample test on an engine that takes a quart of oil. You have to pull four ounces out for the test.
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#10 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 09:34 PM

I always shake my head (and then correct them) when I see someone pull a dipstick, look at it and shove it back in and go. On heavy equipment especially, that's not how it works.


I just did this on my Farmall 140 this past weekend. It sat for 6 months, no rag nearby (that was clean enough to wipe stick) and no strange puddles underneath tractor. Care to Elaborate on correct way so I avoid doing it incorrectly in the future.

#11 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 09:37 PM

Pull out, wipe off, re-insert, pull out and read.
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#12 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2015 - 09:42 PM

Pull out, wipe off, re-insert, pull out and read.


Exactly what I suspected... And I always use the wipe off method on engines when changing oil. I'm bad about checking dipsticks before starting stuff (especially the threaded Kohler dipsticks) so to me just looking at the stick and below the tractor before use is better than not at all.
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#13 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 08, 2015 - 09:18 AM

Oil sampling is used to extend oil drain intervals by monitoring what's in the engine oil. Heavy equipment and truck people use oil sampling to save money long term and to determine when a reman is needed. When you're running equipment that takes ten gallons or more to service, it is worthwhile. I personally wouldn't spend $15 to for an oil sample test on an engine that takes a quart of oil. You have to pull four ounces out for the test.

 

I set up several oil sampling  programs at the coal mines.  We change 100 gallons in each huge reducer on belt drives(2 per drive).  We don't care about the oil cost, or extending the oil life but we care about the content of the oil.  We sample probably 5,000 Falk reducers every quarter.  1,000 gear boxes on Continuous Miners, and probably 500 pieces of surface equipment.  Oil is changed on a schedule, and the oil is sampled at that time.  Then if the sample comes back bad, depending on content we will change the oil again(sampling the oil that was in there) then put fresh in. 

 

So there is more to oil sampling than "extending the oil drain intervals".  Personally I have always followed the OEMs recommended oil change cycles.

 

I have oil sampled a few of my vehicles.  I was able to catch a blown head gasket before it became a problem by the increasing amount of water found in the oil.  Not enough to make it milky, but enough to show up on a test report.  Decided to pull the head and low and behold there was a bad spot starting in the gasket. 

 

Oil sampling has NOTHING, in my opinion, to do with cost of oil, but to do with seeing whats going on in your engine/reducer/gearcase/ect.  Would it not be worth it to find out you were getting a large amount of bearing material in your small sample of oil, and be able to take your engine apart and find out whats going on rather than tear up a rod bearing and ruin an engine that may or may not be easily replaced?


Edited by toomanytoys84, June 08, 2015 - 09:21 AM.

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#14 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted June 08, 2015 - 05:14 PM

I set up several oil sampling  programs at the coal mines.  We change 100 gallons in each huge reducer on belt drives(2 per drive).  We don't care about the oil cost, or extending the oil life but we care about the content of the oil.  We sample probably 5,000 Falk reducers every quarter.  1,000 gear boxes on Continuous Miners, and probably 500 pieces of surface equipment.  Oil is changed on a schedule, and the oil is sampled at that time.  Then if the sample comes back bad, depending on content we will change the oil again(sampling the oil that was in there) then put fresh in. 
 
So there is more to oil sampling than "extending the oil drain intervals".  Personally I have always followed the OEMs recommended oil change cycles.
 
I have oil sampled a few of my vehicles.  I was able to catch a blown head gasket before it became a problem by the increasing amount of water found in the oil.  Not enough to make it milky, but enough to show up on a test report.  Decided to pull the head and low and behold there was a bad spot starting in the gasket. 
 
Oil sampling has NOTHING, in my opinion, to do with cost of oil, but to do with seeing whats going on in your engine/reducer/gearcase/ect.  Would it not be worth it to find out you were getting a large amount of bearing material in your small sample of oil, and be able to take your engine apart and find out whats going on rather than tear up a rod bearing and ruin an engine that may or may not be easily replaced?


I don't disagree with you. That was my first line "to find out out what's in the oil". I, too, have set up oil sampling programs. One test led us to finding residual casting sand in a block that showed up as high silicon levels in the sample. I've been in a coal mine or two and when you are sitting on millions of dollars of equipment and can not afford unplanned downtime, I agree with sampling 110%. I just don't see it being worthwhile in a properly maintained small engine.
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