Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Question for you guys near Lebanon, Pa.


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 04, 2015 - 10:28 AM

It is no secret that I would like to set up my 8.9 acres for a Market garden.
I was on Tractor House and noticed that there were two Kubota L245, for sale with cultivators and one had a side dress fertilizer applicator mounted. (in Lebanon)
Since cultivators have not been used in this area for probably 20 plus years it got me curios.]
They would work nicely for what I am trying to do.

Are they producing a lot of edible produce in that area, what ? Or what are they growing to use that kind of equipment?
  • laurarg3 and georgepf11 have said thanks

#2 Bud W ONLINE  

Bud W

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2359
  • 228 Thanks
  • 217 posts
  • Location: Cly, Pennsylvania

Posted June 04, 2015 - 11:31 AM

There is a lot of farm land in this part of Pa. They grow fruit, vegetables, corn & tobacco.
  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#3 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

adamjd200
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 39654
  • 1,392 Thanks
  • 1,528 posts
  • Location: central Ny

Posted June 04, 2015 - 12:05 PM

There is a lot of farm land in this part of Pa. They grow fruit, vegetables, corn & tobacco.

Ditto, don't live there now but I grew up a 1/2hr-45min. from Lebanon, PA, been there many times, lots of produce grown there, and in neighboring Lancaster, county.



#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 04, 2015 - 12:17 PM

There is a lot of farm land in this part of Pa. They grow fruit, vegetables, corn & tobacco.

Thanks Bud! I am surrounded by Row Crop farmers mostly growing corn and soy beans. Mostly no-till.
60's into the 70's it was. Not uncommon to see a farmer in the field with a cultivator, then chemicals and no till took over.
Right now I am only producing produce for my own use, but plan to go to a Truck Farm operation once I get the equipment.

Monday I had to talk to the Co-op that borders my property. While mowing, I noticed I had some clover killed from spray drift.
I am not cropping it so am not to upset about that. But it was within 75 ft of my 19 fruit trees?
I just asked them to be more careful about wind drift since I have 7000 sq ft of garden, rasberries, black berries and fruit I have 5 yrs invested in and would be upset if Roundup killed it all.

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 04, 2015 - 04:46 PM.

  • Alc, KennyP, TomLGT195 and 1 other said thanks

#5 shorty ONLINE  

shorty

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 6172
  • 3,544 Thanks
  • 3,929 posts
  • Location: Lancaster County Pa

Posted June 04, 2015 - 08:32 PM

There are quite a few produce farms around, most are 30-50 acre farms. I see most of the guys using plastic for weed control instead of cultivating for the last several years. The sweet corn growers are amazing. One morning, I was headed to work through a heavy downpour of rain. And there I saw lights in the field, they were out picking at 5 in the morning. There is a local firm that makes all kinds of equipment for the produce farmer. There are several auctions set up for selling produce for the farmers and many roadside stands.

 

My wife grew up in Lebanon county and I am from next door in Lancaster.


Edited by shorty, June 04, 2015 - 08:45 PM.

  • Alc and JD DANNELS have said thanks

#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 04, 2015 - 10:27 PM

When I was 15, my two brothers and I, planted 4 acres of sweet corn on a neighbors property about 2 blocks from home. We lived on a state highway, and sold it in our driveway for 35 cents a dozen. We also sold a lot to the two local grocery stores for 30 cents a dozen.

I about choked when I had to pay $ 6.00 a dozen last summer.
But have to admit I understand about being out at 4 am picking, and getting soaking wet from the dew, then sitting at a stand all day in the hot sun. So yes I guess it's worth $ 6.00 a dozen, even if the people selling these days do not know what a "Bakers Dozen" is.

Sweet Corn is kind of a sore subject for me right now. I planted 8 rows about 50 ft long, and only about 5 stocks ever came up?
I planted two more packets of seed, tuesday, hope this does better.
If this does not work I may plow up a patch clear on the east end of the property next year.

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 04, 2015 - 10:37 PM.

  • shorty said thank you

#7 shorty ONLINE  

shorty

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 6172
  • 3,544 Thanks
  • 3,929 posts
  • Location: Lancaster County Pa

Posted June 05, 2015 - 05:41 PM

I had a sorry germination this year. Less than half came up in corn, peas, red beats.



#8 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

johndeereelfman

    Elfin Majic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3761
  • 5,480 Thanks
  • 2,535 posts
  • Location: Lititz, PA

Posted June 06, 2015 - 08:50 PM

For the farmers who grow cash crops, they grow corn, tobacco, alfalfa, and soy beans. For the farm market farmers, most of the farms around here are growing a variety of everything such as, sweet corn, cabbage, string beans, sugar peas, raspberries, radishes, watermelons, strawberries, squash, egg plant, bell peppers, carrots, celery, turnips, pumpkins, and so on. Don't know if this was the answer you were looking for or not.

 

As for the sweet corn crops, the Amish start planting their seeds at the beginning of March already, then cover the rows with plastic. After the corn starts to grow and gets about 4-6 inches high, they'll remove the plastic and expose it to the current temperature. They always seem to be the first to have sweet corn for sale in our area. 

 

One thing I have also learned, and that is to change the crop location every seven years. If you normally plant your corn in the same area of your garden every year, they say to change the location of corn planting to another part of the garden on the seventh year, or skip a year of planting. Not sure why, but since I have found this out a few years back, I started noticing that most farmers follow this method. One farmer in particular has grown feed corn in this one field for the past six years, and I took notice that he has soy beans planted there this year, and the feed corn is now where the soy beans used to be. Maybe Daniel could shed some light on why this is so important? 


  • Alc and JD DANNELS have said thanks

#9 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

adamjd200
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 39654
  • 1,392 Thanks
  • 1,528 posts
  • Location: central Ny

Posted June 06, 2015 - 09:30 PM

For the farmers who grow cash crops, they grow corn, tobacco, alfalfa, and soy beans. For the farm market farmers, most of the farms around here are growing a variety of everything such as, sweet corn, cabbage, string beans, sugar peas, raspberries, radishes, watermelons, strawberries, squash, egg plant, bell peppers, carrots, celery, turnips, pumpkins, and so on. Don't know if this was the answer you were looking for or not.

 

As for the sweet corn crops, the Amish start planting their seeds at the beginning of March already, then cover the rows with plastic. After the corn starts to grow and gets about 4-6 inches high, they'll remove the plastic and expose it to the current temperature. They always seem to be the first to have sweet corn for sale in our area. 

 

One thing I have also learned, and that is to change the crop location every seven years. If you normally plant your corn in the same area of your garden every year, they say to change the location of corn planting to another part of the garden on the seventh year, or skip a year of planting. Not sure why, but since I have found this out a few years back, I started noticing that most farmers follow this method. One farmer in particular has grown feed corn in this one field for the past six years, and I took notice that he has soy beans planted there this year, and the feed corn is now where the soy beans used to be. Maybe Daniel could shed some light on why this is so important? 

One reason for this would be parasites such as corn bore that enter the stalk through the root and damage the stalk from the inside, less than 7years is not a bad idea.


  • JD DANNELS and johndeereelfman have said thanks

#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 06, 2015 - 11:05 PM

Johnhdeereelfman, that is exactly what i as wanting to know.
Since vegetable cropping is unusual in this area, the equipment and people doing it ot here would be considered unusual.
Though I am beginning to see more people doing it, especially if they are within an hour of Metro areas.
I have recently learned that there are two wholesale vegetable action houses in the state.
Both near areas of Amish and Mennonnite groups settlements and about 80 miles from me.

So far I have found the equipment suitable is pretty much not available from distributors in this state and will have to have it shipped in.
My hiller shanks came from Agri-Supply, The Cole and Covington Planters,while from the south east can be bought from a distributor in Minnesota,. Sweets think is in Kentucky, but on their site state that they can ship to a depot in Des Moines.
I wanted to buy a Garden Package, that included Cultivator,Middlebuster, and hiller STEVENS TRACTOR in Louisianna, but the freight charges made it more than I coould afford at the time. So I got the discs fromAgri-Supply and built my hiller. I bought a Middkle Buster from Tractor Supply in Ankeny about 30 miles from me. Still need cultivator, but have been getting by with my Super Bronco Troy BUillt.

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 06, 2015 - 11:28 PM.

  • Alc said thank you

#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 06, 2015 - 11:27 PM

One thing I need to work on is my bedding system. I am not happy with the way I am making beds with my hilling discs.
Set up the way I have it I only get a 22 inch top on the beds.I was at least 36 inches and possibly 48 for some things.

There are a couple pieces of equipment that I have never seen used in Iowa and am interested in.
One is the Lesche Pan bedder, they say it only takes 25 hp. The drawback maybe that my Ford 1500 will not let me set the wheels out to 72 inches on center.
The other is used in Louisiana ( saw it in a video from the Bayou Gardener) and I suspect other parts of the South. It is like my Hilling discs, but instead of one disc has three discs and can be set at angles to throw more dirt into the bed

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 06, 2015 - 11:32 PM.

  • Alc said thank you

#12 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,451 Thanks
  • 6,618 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted June 07, 2015 - 05:27 AM

Though I'm about 90 miles away from Lebanon I thought I would tell you what the market gardeners are using around here . Lots of high tunnels , I'm not sure how but some movable . Raised beds with plastic . Floating row covers,sometimes looks like a whole football field waving in white ! Good luck !

#13 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

johndeereelfman

    Elfin Majic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3761
  • 5,480 Thanks
  • 2,535 posts
  • Location: Lititz, PA

Posted June 07, 2015 - 11:31 AM

Instead of using a disc to make your beds, what if you designed a three point attachment that looked like a "V" shaped snow plow? Sort of like the ones used by the State Trucks during the Winter months, only you'd be pulling it rather than pushing it like them. Make it so you can adjust the angle of each side, so that it can be customized for your particular row spacing. Could even have an adjustable tilt setting, so that it will throw more or less dirt into each bed depending on the bed height that you are looking to achieve. Could possibly fab up something that resembles a sleeve mount Brinly Cultivator frame.  Just a thought, and maybe not a good idea. Wouldn't know why it couldn't work though.


  • JD DANNELS and KennyP have said thanks

#14 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 07, 2015 - 12:21 PM

Instead of using a disc to make your beds, what if you designed a three point attachment that looked like a "V" shaped snow plow? Sort of like the ones used by the State Trucks during the Winter months, only you'd be pulling it rather than pushing it like them. Make it so you can adjust the angle of each side, so that it can be customized for your particular row spacing. Could even have an adjustable tilt setting, so that it will throw more or less dirt into each bed depending on the bed height that you are looking to achieve. Could possibly fab up something that resembles a sleeve mount Brinly Cultivator frame. Just a thought, and maybe not a good idea. Wouldn't know why it couldn't work though.

Yes that is more less what a pan bedder is,and does use a flare at the front to gather soil. And what I am thinking of building. Louisiana State University even has free plans available on the Internet. They designed theirs to use on a John Deere cultivator frame.
I have been debating that, or taking the leveling door off my 48 inch tiller and making a press pan to replace it?
I could mount a couple category 0 top links to regulate down pressure on the pan for determining the top of bed coactiom?
D
That would allow me to till and bed in one pass, if it works?

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 07, 2015 - 12:22 PM.





Top