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Tire Tube question!


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#1 gtcsreg ONLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 08:41 PM

Hey guys, I've had a couple of vintage full sized tractors in the past (AC B and WC) and sold them. Now thinking of getting a replacement for tractor cruises and shows. I'm looking at a styled WC but the price is a little high but might make a deal if the rear tires weren't an issue. The rears have some tread but some extreme sidewall cracking. Here's my question. Considering the limited use I plan for the tractor could I install tubes instead of replacing the expensive rears and expect to do ok? I'd like a response from someone who's tried this if it is possible.

Thanks,
Reg
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#2 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 08:45 PM

Hey guys, I've had a couple of vintage full sized tractors in the past (AC B and WC) and sold them. Now thinking of getting a replacement for tractor cruises and shows. I'm looking at a styled WC but the price is a little high but might make a deal if the rear tires weren't an issue. The rears have some tread but some extreme sidewall cracking. Here's my question. Considering the limited use I plan for the tractor could I install tubes instead of replacing the expensive rears and expect to do ok? I'd like a response from someone who's tried this if it is possible.

Thanks,
Reg

Chances are there are already tubes in them, never seen an antique tractor with tubeless tires.


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#3 gtcsreg ONLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 09:18 PM

Chances are there are already tubes in them, never seen an antique tractor with tubeless tires.


I should have caught that one. Would replacing them work or are they likely to get tore up by the inner sidewalls?
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#4 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 09:36 PM

I've gotten by with that before. 

 

I will say, though, that expensive as new shoes are, it sure takes a lot of worry out of an old tractor... and it makes it look a whole heck of a lot better as well!

 

Ben W.


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#5 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 10:26 PM

I had to put tubes in my 1968 front tires last year.  Guys at the tire shop squawked but they were ok inside even tho the outsides look ready to split.  But i only drive it around the yard and keep the pressure low.  Might try an inner patch on the bad spots next time, like they use for flat repair, just to keep it smooth on the tube, good luck


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#6 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 10:26 PM

I should have caught that one. Would replacing them work or are they likely to get tore up by the inner sidewalls?

If the tires are not too bad to break and re-seat the bead, possibly if you are just going to drive it for show occasionally it would get you by, wouldn't use it to plow like that as the tires will just develop breaks in them.


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#7 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2015 - 10:28 PM

I had to put tubes in my 1968 front tires last year.  Guys at the tire shop squawked but they were ok inside even tho the outsides look ready to split.  But i only drive it around the yard and keep the pressure low.  Might try an inner patch on the bad spots next time, like they use for flat repair, just to keep it smooth on the tube, good luck

Or possibly a heavy blow-out patch on the worst areas.


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#8 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 03:11 AM

If they are holding air and have at least some bars left, leave them alone!  Wash them with Wesley's Bleach White for tires and maybe add some of that tire shine stuff to make them look a little better and be happy. You don't say what size. 38" is popular and you can find new and used pretty easy. If you have 34 or 36", looking probly just for new and big money. I say if everything is sealing on the wheels as they are, don't bother them. Once they get old enough, taking them off can make them break apart and harm beads on rusty rims also.


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#9 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 04:50 AM

    I have run really nasty tires by putting tubes in them, just run the air pressure really low and don't do anything extreme with them.  the others are rite, most times you can replace tires for just a little more than the tubes cost just look around and be vigilant there are good deals out there.

                                                               Pete


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#10 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 08:35 AM

There is an old saying ; "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".  glgrumpy said it right.  Clean them up good and get some protectant on them and keep an eye out for some better tires.  From experience as I used to run all old equipment.  Once you mess with it your going to keep messing with it.


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#11 nbent ONLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 09:02 AM

On these old tractors that don't do much most guys in our tractor club just run them on my farmall h all the tires are weather checked and the backs are starting to split I have been watching them carefully and like others said don't but a lot of air in them I think my rears are at 12 lbs. I would watch Craigslist for used tires or maybe put an add up looking for used ones if they are really bad or concern you a lot.

#12 gtcsreg ONLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 09:07 AM

I follow the adage of if it ani't broke don't fix it myself. I haven't caught my friend who has it for sale yet. They are down so not sure if they hold air for any length of time at all. I don't mind airing them up once a month but beyond that something would have to be done. Oh, and if memory serve me right they were 11 - 28 tires

Reg

Edited by gtcsreg, June 03, 2015 - 09:08 AM.


#13 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 12:07 PM

If they are holding air and have at least some bars left, leave them alone!  Wash them with Wesley's Bleach White for tires and maybe add some of that tire shine stuff to make them look a little better and be happy. You don't say what size. 38" is popular and you can find new and used pretty easy. If you have 34 or 36", looking probly just for new and big money. I say if everything is sealing on the wheels as they are, don't bother them. Once they get old enough, taking them off can make them break apart and harm beads on rusty rims also.

34" aren't that hard to find used, our Farmall 706 has them on, so did a lot of 60's and 70's tractors, 36" can be a pain to find, been looking for a pair for my Super C as it is NOT a show tractor and will be used on our farm, and to plow, ect.



#14 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 12:09 PM

I follow the adage of if it ani't broke don't fix it myself. I haven't caught my friend who has it for sale yet. They are down so not sure if they hold air for any length of time at all. I don't mind airing them up once a month but beyond that something would have to be done. Oh, and if memory serve me right they were 11 - 28 tires

Reg

11-28's shouldn't be hard to find, a lot of utility tractors used that size or close to that size.



#15 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2015 - 12:41 PM

Yeah, 11 x 28, aren't they used on most Ford N's and such?  Bet used ones all over for those. hit the tractor swaps this year. Portland just had one and big show in 3rd week of August!  Is couple of BIG shows in middle ILL each summer too, check the web or local papers.


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