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Exhausting


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#1 Tankman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 04:04 PM

Found a Briggs 16 hp in an old Simplicity. Going to put the engine in our '66 B-10 Allis Chalmers.

 

Here's our 1st problem. Can't seem to get the exhaust street elbow out of the block.

Elbow is of course cast as is the block.

 

Been using PB Blaster for a few days, nada, zip. So far I'm clueless.

 

Any ideas? Appreciate any information I can get.   :oh_shucks:


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#2 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 04:15 PM

There is an article or thread on here somewhere about who to do it.  Basically, you use a hacksaw blade to cut the nipple down to the threads (from the inside) and then use a cold chisel to bend the nipple & break the rust.  


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#3 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 04:39 PM

http://gardentractor...ler-nipple-r123


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#4 EricFromPa OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 04:40 PM

There is an article or thread on here somewhere about who to do it.  Basically, you use a hacksaw blade to cut the nipple down to the threads (from the inside) and then use a cold chisel to bend the nipple & break the rust.  

 

Ya that works.

 

Might want to see about borrowing a big 1" pipe tap to clean the threads before installing new pipe.That way you can thread it in more than a couple threads.


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#5 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 05:02 PM

Yep, hacksaw method is the best way to go

 

My Grandfather taught me that trick years ago on a farmall cub muffler pipe rusted to the manifold


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#6 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 05:14 PM

The machinist/millwright in me would pull the head, and slowly heat the area around the port with a torch, then I'd try to keep the elbow cool. (cool can or wet cloth) The difference in expansion of the head and the shrinkage of the elbow can make all the difference. It's a technique I've used o dozens of occasions over the last few decades.

 

It's risky and it may not work, but that's what I ( not any one else) would try first.


Edited by Chopperhed, May 28, 2015 - 05:23 PM.

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#7 classic OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 05:34 PM

The hack saw blade trick works great. Lately I've been able to get them loose after spraying with penitrant and heating the block around the exhaust port with map gas. It didn't take a whole lot of heat to get the pipe loose. Some can be rusted in so bad that you will have to use the hack saw blade method. Make sure you don't just screw the new muffler or pipe fitting tight into the block when you install your new exhaust. Thread the new muffler or pipe fitting in until it's snug, back it off a little, then use a jam nut to keep it in place like the factory did. The mufflers or fittings that I've had the toughest time with were the ones that didn't have a jam nut and were just screwed tight into the block,
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#8 Coventry Plumber OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 06:28 PM

I have just recently removed one from a scrapped block. I sprayed it every couple days for a few weeks then I inserted a pipe in to the elbow as far as I could for leverage then while pushing on the pipe I tapped the end of the elbow with a light hammer. It did take about a thousand taps but It worked. The steel elbow is very solid and did not bend with the pressure or dent with the tapping. I would make the hacksaw method last resort. I've used that method on steam radiators many times. I takes lots of patience . Good luck

Edited by Coventry Plumber, May 28, 2015 - 06:29 PM.

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#9 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 07:01 PM

If you go the heating route, while everything is still hot, melt some wax onto/into the threads. This will assist in removing the fitting.

(Yes, I have tried it and it worked.)


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#10 mtoney OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 08:35 PM

Make sure to use some high temp anti sieze on the new pipe threads and use the jam nut method, makes all the difference when it comes time to take it apart again in the future!   Mike


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#11 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 09:43 PM

When you get it out and chase the threads with the tap, coat the threads and fill the flutes of the tap with grease. This will trap any loose debris from cleaning the threads.

I'm with Mike, use anti-seize. A half pint can will last a man a lifetime. Most anything that gives me grief in disassembly, gets reassembled with anti-seize. It will help the next guy--which may be me--when he takes it apart.
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#12 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 09:51 PM

I have just recently removed one from a scrapped block. I sprayed it every couple days for a few weeks then I inserted a pipe in to the elbow as far as I could for leverage then while pushing on the pipe I tapped the end of the elbow with a light hammer. It did take about a thousand taps but It worked. The steel elbow is very solid and did not bend with the pressure or dent with the tapping. I would make the hacksaw method last resort. I've used that method on steam radiators many times. I takes lots of patience . Good luck


Agreed. Patience and being gentle is key. I have had things frozen that seemed like they would never break free. Keep penetrating oil and working it a little every day or two. For me, if I start get aggravated with it, it's time to go do something else before it's tempting to get ham handed. Then one day it moves a little. At that point, I spray it and tighten it up, then back out as far as it will go. And keep spraying. I tell my boys to treat stuck bolts and such like women--a gentle touch will go a long ways.
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#13 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 09:56 PM

I just took a stub of a 3/4" muffler out of an aluminum Briggs, no lock not on it, so it took hack saw, pipe wrench, hammer, penetrating oil, cussing, two days, and a good flushing with brake parts cleaner at the end. It is always good to flush the chips from sawing out of the exhaust port with brake parts cleaner with the exhaust valve closed, (check before starting to extract. So the moral of the story is, don't make it a habit, I have two more to attack this month LOL. And yes, do as was mentioned earlier, install til hand snug, then tighten a lock nut. This will not affect you now, but give it a decade or two, if not you, somebody will thank you for not making it harder.
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#14 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 10:03 PM

By the way, I got in a hurry on this one (if you call two days a hurry) while hacksawing and put a nice saw grove in the aluminum on the inside of the exhaust port, and threads, so please be careful. Since this isn't an engine I am going to use a bunch it was more of a disappointment than a concern of integrity, as I'm sure the engine was abused more before my aquiring it than I ever will going forward. On the flip side, based on how stubborn it was to make it move (even after cutting and penetranting oil) with an 18" pipe wrench and a 3 pound hammer, I doubt I would have been able to avoid relief cutting it so deep, or been able to add a cut opposite the first cut and still have gotten it out.

#15 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2015 - 03:21 AM

Mix up some Acetone & ATF for penetrating oil. It has surprised me how easy some rusted bolts came apart.


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