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Elec-trak solar charging?


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#1 Titus OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 09:29 AM

I've seen this done. I've seen multiple photos on the topic, but with little written.

  

http://neeaa.org/robieet.htm

 

http://www.builditso...ecTrak/Main.htm

 

 

I just bought a new house, and will be looking towards battery backup down the road. I'm not looking for anything high-tech yet, just something simple like a panel and plug it in. Or does that not exist?

 

What do you all use? Any photos? Thanks everyone


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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2015 - 10:19 AM

The solar electric idea is very interesting. HF has a 45w set up with controller on sale for $140. That is not alot of charging but it is great for just topping off. In your case I do not know how you would go to 36v. I would try charging a large battery(or several in parallel) and use it to power an inverter that could power your 36v charger. You would probably want a set up of 200w of panels of output to start but have the ability to add more if 200w is not enough.

 

I've been watching the development of solar electric panels for many years. Ten years ago there was a great breakthrough anounced that was going to drop the cost of panels to 1/10 of what they were in 2006. Still haven't seen that cost savings passed through to the consumer. The solar panel setups that the telemarketeers are pushing is not a good deal in my area. You rent them your roof and allow intrussions into your house to save 2 cents per kilo watt hour. I'm sure that the installers are completely trustworthy.

 

It looks like consumer photovoltaic is on a back burner for now. The panels only last on average about 10 years so used ones are a risk. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 WisJim OFFLINE  

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Posted August 29, 2016 - 08:49 PM

Just looking through older posts and read this one about solar electricity.  Lots of misunderstanding of solar expressed--our first solar electric panels (photovoltaics or PVs) were about $8 a watt, or more, in 1981.  Our latest ones were under a dollar a watt, in 2012.  $8 in 1981 is about  $20 in 2012 when adjusted for inflation, so prices have dropped tremendously.  My panels that were new in 1981 are still working like they did 35 years ago--and they had a 5 year warranty.  Most new panels have a 20 or 25 year warranty and are expected to function at least twice that long.  If you are interested in solar at your home or shop, check with a local NABCEP certified installer/dealer for an honest appraisal and estimate. Our solar electric system provides our home and shop power, charges our Nissan Leaf electric car (and a number of electric conversion cars in the past), and my GE Elec-trak tractors.  This includes the power needed to run the heat pumps that provide all of our air conditioning and much of our heat in our home.


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#4 jimmy G OFFLINE  

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Posted August 30, 2016 - 12:14 AM

Wisjim is telling you man to man not like the bogie man in media, just bought two 100w panels for $230 shipped, and every thing I paid over $10 a watt for is still working, storage will be the biggest expense (battery's). their are many ways to go about this and it's all on line
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#5 jimmy G OFFLINE  

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Posted August 30, 2016 - 12:40 AM

The solar electric idea is very interesting. HF has a 45w set up with controller on sale for $140. That is not alot of charging but it is great for just topping off. In your case I do not know how you would go to 36v. I would try charging a large battery(or several in parallel) and use it to power an inverter that could power your 36v charger. You would probably want a set up of 200w of panels of output to start but have the ability to add more if 200w is not enough.

I've been watching the development of solar electric panels for many years. Ten years ago there was a great breakthrough anounced that was going to drop the cost of panels to 1/10 of what they were in 2006. Still haven't seen that cost savings passed through to the consumer. The solar panel setups that the telemarketeers are pushing is not a good deal in my area. You rent them your roof and allow intrussions into your house to save 2 cents per kilo watt hour. I'm sure that the installers are completely trustworthy.

It looks like consumer photovoltaic is on a back burner for now. The panels only last on average about 10 years so used ones are a risk. Good Luck, Rick

solar panels work just like battery's, two 12v battery's in parallel make's a bigger 12v battery, two 12v battery's in series makes a 24v battery,3 =36v,the higher the the system voltage the more efficient, charging DC with DC only requires a regulator and enough output. this stuff is out their and the price IS going down
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#6 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted August 30, 2016 - 08:36 AM

Just looking through older posts and read this one about solar electricity.  Lots of misunderstanding of solar expressed--our first solar electric panels (photovoltaics or PVs) were about $8 a watt, or more, in 1981.  Our latest ones were under a dollar a watt, in 2012.  $8 in 1981 is about  $20 in 2012 when adjusted for inflation, so prices have dropped tremendously.  My panels that were new in 1981 are still working like they did 35 years ago--and they had a 5 year warranty.  Most new panels have a 20 or 25 year warranty and are expected to function at least twice that long.  If you are interested in solar at your home or shop, check with a local NABCEP certified installer/dealer for an honest appraisal and estimate. Our solar electric system provides our home and shop power, charges our Nissan Leaf electric car (and a number of electric conversion cars in the past), and my GE Elec-trak tractors.  This includes the power needed to run the heat pumps that provide all of our air conditioning and much of our heat in our home.

Welcome to GTT. Thanks for the info. One thing to remember is that the panels that you bought 35 years ago were probably made in the USA, Most everything now is made in China. The quality now is at best questionable.

 

I built my house passive solar and super insulated 20 years ago(still not finished) so, I have an 1800 square foot section of 7/12 roof facing true south. I would love to have good solar panels rigged up with a fuel cell storage system. Around here, the components and the contractors don't have good enough reputations. Three friends have put them up and are generally content with them but all had problems. 

 

I've talked to many of the companies and one of the engineers admitted to me that their panels degrade as much as 50% in 10 years. I'm waiting to learn more before I spend the money. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, August 30, 2016 - 08:37 AM.


#7 Mustard Tiger ONLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2018 - 12:25 PM

My panels that were new in 1981 are still working like they did 35 years ago


If that were actually true, it would be a huge scientific breakthrough that would be plastered all over the media. Every PV panel ever made produces less power as it ages. They still work, but they absolutely do not work like they did when they were new.

For people in northern areas, solar is only worth it if the government is subsidizing it enough. And then it isn't actually solar being worth it, it is just taking advantage of government idiocy. Even big PV power stations don't break even, like this disaster: https://en.wikipedia...aic_Power_Plant
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#8 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2018 - 05:21 PM

That's our Ontario government for ya, paying 44.3 cents per kw/hr, as the link says, for that project.

They have paid up to 85 cents per kw/hr on some solar installation's

No wonder hydro is so expensive when they waste money like that.

Found out today that the CEO of Ont Hydro gets paid $1.500,000. per yr, got himself a $400,000. raise from last yr.

What did he do to deserve that?

So much waste that all taxpayers pay for, not fair.

 

 

 

 

edit   took the bad word out


Edited by DH1, March 23, 2018 - 06:25 PM.

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#9 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 27, 2018 - 08:29 AM

There are numerous multi acre solar farms going up around here. There are also many panels going up on roofs. There are several schemes for the roof panels. It is easy to tell that some were swindles because thw panels are not facing the sun much. In a few cases the panels are facing north and the owners just think the panels are defective.

In our area, the panel farms are supplemented a bit because we would otherwise have to build several large power generation plants. Nuclear will take too long and the supply of natural gas to our region is restricted by the gas line capacity. With recent gas line explosions in mind, nobody wants new gas lines through their area. Because we are on the coast, wind generation works but, the tree huggers are worried about birds flying into the blades(which actually move slowly). I pay $0.09 per kilowatthour for generation and $0.15 per kilowatthour for distribution. Because we have had so many major storms in the past 10 years, the distribution rate has trippled. Good Luck, Rick




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