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Project For The Day


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#1 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 06:26 AM

Main project for today is to get 16 gal of gas out of the fuel tank in a car.  A week ago my partner filled up in town and then drove to the neighbor town to do some business, 32 miles away.  Got rear ended by some gal that wasn't looking at here driving.  Long story short, car was totaled.  Could not get close to a settlement from the other drivers insurance (Farmers).  When they came down to look at the car the adjustor nit picked at ever little thing he could possibly find to devalue the car.  It is a '03 Ford Taurus with 175,000 miles, ran great, good gas mileage (28) used no oil and paid for.  Her insurance paid her a respectable price (over twice what Farmers offered) for the car so she settled with them and they will go after Farmers for their loss.

 

Now we are going to get that 16 gal of gas out of that tank.  Going to jack it up and put it on jack stands just high enough to get under it with a drill.  New titanium drill bit will go through that tank like butter and a battery drill so no electric involved.  Let it run into a funnel with hose attached and into 5 gal gas cans.  Will drill about midway front to back on the side so there will be enough gas in the tank to drive it a bit.  Will put a lag screw with rubber washer in the hole when we are done so no gas leaking around anywhere.  They were to get the car yesterday (Salvage yard) but didn't show up so today the gas leaves the tank.


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#2 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 09:02 AM

Why not just run a siphon through the fill tube? Drilling into a gas tank can be catastrophic. Be carefull. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 dthomp17 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 10:18 AM

I agree with Rick.  I think drilling into the tank would be too dangerous with too great a risk of fire.



#4 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 10:24 AM

Just don't use a match or cigarette lighter to see how much fuel is left.

#5 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 10:40 AM

Most modern cars have had the fuel knecks "syphon proof" for years. They have little blockage thing in it somehow. I would be afraid a spark from bit or maybe the motor on drill might make "boom" sound!  If you can still reach it, would remove the gas filler tube and get a syphon  tube or just plain tube and give the "suck" try (yuk!) to remove that way. OR, is it Really that big of deal to save it?? Sometimes you just gotta let stuff go, the recovery is not worth the risks to do it.  What if problem and you end up in Hospital and out of work?  Loss of income is much more than cost of that tank of gas, besides at today's rates, can't be real big $ amount anyway. Not worth the effort in my opin.


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#6 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 11:47 AM

Battery operated drills do spark. It's still electricity with brushes that arc. Most all,of mine spark,when I let off the trigger. I've seen it when working late into the evening.

Is 16 gallons of gas that valuable that you would drive over, get under the car and risk an earlier than desired visit to see St Pete?

if you took the check, technically the car and contents are no longer yours. They belong to your insurance company--including those 16 gallons of gas.

In today's world of cell phones, if somebody calls on you, you will have a hard time explaining things to the sheriff.
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#7 DennyIN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 01:40 PM

Would remove the filler pipe and syphon out the gas if I was doing it, then put the filler pipe back in. But, I wouldn't do it because it isn't your partner's car anymore. 


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#8 Gtractor OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2015 - 04:47 PM

How about removing the fuel line near the engine, connecting a piece of hose to there with the other end into your gas can,   

then cycling the key switch so the cars fuel pump does the work for you?

 

Seems much safer to me.

 

Take 10-12 gallon and leave them 4-6.  

I've never seen an insurance company pay someone more for a full tank in a totalled car.   I say its your gas BUT agree its not worth retrieving if it can't be removed safely AND in an enviornmentally friendly way. 


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#9 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2015 - 08:59 AM

Why not just run a siphon through the fill tube? Drilling into a gas tank can be catastrophic. Be carefull. Good Luck, Rick

 

Because for the last 20 years thy put a heavy block at then fill entry to the tank and you cannot get a hose anything else past it into the tank.  This was done to prevent siphoning.


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#10 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2015 - 09:05 AM

How about removing the fuel line near the engine, connecting a piece of hose to there with the other end into your gas can,   

then cycling the key switch so the cars fuel pump does the work for you?

 

Seems much safer to me.

 

Take 10-12 gallon and leave them 4-6.  

I've never seen an insurance company pay someone more for a full tank in a totalled car.   I say its your gas BUT agree its not worth retrieving if it can't be removed safely AND in an enviornmentally friendly way. 

It may SEEM much safer but your using electricity to do the pumping, and with the computer systems the pump will cycle on and off then off again as there will be to much fuel flow.  Also have you tried to get to the fuel line to the throttle body on newer vehicles?  Nearly impossible without removing the top half of the engine.


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#11 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2015 - 09:20 AM

Son showed up about 9 and went after the project.  Gas is out and no problem at all.  Done safely and didn't spill more than half a cup full.  Jacked the back end up with front wheels blocked.  Put 3 ton jack stand under each rear suspension at the wheels.  Jack under the rear center to get it up higher and take pressure off the jack stands.  Drilled a 3/16" hole about midway front to back on the bottom at the passenger side.  Spilled a tiny bit of gas during removal of the drill and getting the coffee can under the stream.  With two of us working alternated plastic coffee can and removed 17 cans nearly full when it stopped running.  About 14 gallons of fuel saved.  Enough to run our tractors for quite some time.

 

Had a large metal screw with a nylon seal ready to go in.  Screwed it in tight, set the car back down on the ground.  No leaks.  Parked the car around back under a tree till the salvage yard can get here to get it.  With another .37" it may be a while. 

 

This was not the first one we did this way.  Son bought a pickup a few years ago, not running.  Supposed to have a new fuel pump, full tank of gas and still no run.  Found out right off it was pumping water into the throttle body instead of gas.  Jacked the side up, drilled a hole in the front corner and let it run into a can.. Pure water.  They had cut a hole in the bed to access the fuel tank.  Checked that and found the seal was not in place and a winters worth of snow and rain ran into the tank to fill it with water.  Got it completely drained and plugged the hole with a screw and seal.  Fresh gas and it fired right off.  He had to change fuel filter ever 100 miles or so for about the first 6 or 8 tanks of fuel but got all the water out.  Drove it till it had 280K miles on it.  Sold it and it is still on the road.

 

If you know what your doing and do it outdoors it is not a problem, safety or environmentally.


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