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How to Set Up PTO Shaft for Tiller on My Kubota

yanmar rs1200 tiller kubota b7100 yanmar pto shaft cutting pto shaft

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#1 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 11:03 PM

I picked up a Yanmar RS 1200 tiller for my Kubota B7100 the other day.  It's a 48" wide, shaft-driven tiller, that uses a standard 1 3/8" x 6 spline coupling.  These were made both in a proprietary 2 point configuration, and a 3 point configuration.

 

Mine is a 3 point, but a previous owner still had to extend the bracket for the lift arm pins about 4".  The PTO shaft for it is too long for my 'Bota... the shaft is 28" end to end, and my Kubota needs something about 22" long. The old shaft is a splined slip yoke like an automotive drive shaft, not a 3-sided telescoping shaft like most tractor PTO Shafts. It has been shortened by a previous owner, who didn't get the joints phased very well. I didn't feel comfortable trying to shorten this one on my own.

 

A local shop wanted $95 to shorten and balance it, but I found a new one for $70 at a Case dealer that's going out of business...

 

So, my biggest question is...

 

If I shorten the new PTO shaft to 22", there will only be 18 inches center to center on the U-joint yokes.  There's enough room for the shafts to extend and collapse without coming apart, I'm just worried that the shaft will be too short and put a lot of stress on the U-joints, tiller input shaft, and the tractor PTO.

 

Does this sound like it's too short; do I need to find another solution rather than shortening the shaft (like lengthening the bracket for the lift arm pins?)

 

Thanks for any input you may have.

 

Regards,

 

Smitty


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#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 04:43 AM

Smitty, can you estimate the angles on the Ujoints. If you can figure out the angle using some trig.that should tell you if you are too short or not. Do they spec. the max. recommended angle for those PTO shafts? You will only be sending a lot of power through the shaft when the tiller is down in the soil, so that's the most important angle. Usually the angle is less in the down position for most setups I've seen.


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#3 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 07:54 AM

Smitty, can you estimate the angles on the Ujoints. If you can figure out the angle using some trig.that should tell you if you are too short or not. Do they spec. the max. recommended angle for those PTO shafts? You will only be sending a lot of power through the shaft when the tiller is down in the soil, so that's the most important angle. Usually the angle is less in the down position for most setups I've seen.

Thanks, Brian... that's a good suggestion.  I'll try it.

 

Smitty



#4 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 07:58 AM

The thing to do is this. Install the tiller onto the tractor with the drive shaft off and removed from the tiller.. Next raise the tiller so that the tiller shaft is in line with the tractors pto shaft.  Measure the distance between the groove in the tractors pto shaft and the groove in the tillers shaft.  Now with the pto shaft together and compressed, sitting on the bench measure the same distance between the locking pins. If the shaft is to long it will need to be cut.  If you need to cut figure out how much you need to cut from each end of the shaft and tube.  You'll have to cut 1/2 of what you need from the tube and 1/2 of what you need from the shaft. Of course a good thing to do is to cut 1/2 a inch more then the tight length to allow for the shaft to not bottom out. It's really easy to figure out just make sure the shafts never bottom out. I have pics etc; just trying to figure out how to get them on here.


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#5 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 08:11 AM

Put the tiller on as MD suggested, sans shaft, and measure. I would add that might be a good idea to run the rear end up on stepped up 2x6's enough to lower the tiller to digging depth to eyeball that, and lift it all the way up and measure that.

Try using the proprietary 2 point. Mine ends up with the two shafts 6" apart, and uses a double knuckle to hook them up. That made me nervous the first time I fired it up.

Does your Yanmar use trailing wheels for depth control?
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#6 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 12:13 PM

Put the tiller on as MD suggested, sans shaft, and measure. I would add that might be a good idea to run the rear end up on stepped up 2x6's enough to lower the tiller to digging depth to eyeball that, and lift it all the way up and measure that.

Try using the proprietary 2 point. Mine ends up with the two shafts 6" apart, and uses a double knuckle to hook them up. That made me nervous the first time I fired it up.

Does your Yanmar use trailing wheels for depth control?

Thanks, Cat385

 

My tiller isn't set up for 2 point hook up so I dont' have the arms or bendable top link for it... in fact, I'm not sure what they look like. However, it does have the depth control crank wheel with two 13" metal wheels trailing the tiller.

 

Smitty


Edited by Utah Smitty, May 19, 2015 - 12:15 PM.


#7 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 12:17 PM

The thing to do is this. Install the tiller onto the tractor with the drive shaft off and removed from the tiller.. Next raise the tiller so that the tiller shaft is in line with the tractors pto shaft.  Measure the distance between the groove in the tractors pto shaft and the groove in the tillers shaft.  Now with the pto shaft together and compressed, sitting on the bench measure the same distance between the locking pins. If the shaft is to long it will need to be cut.  If you need to cut figure out how much you need to cut from each end of the shaft and tube.  You'll have to cut 1/2 of what you need from the tube and 1/2 of what you need from the shaft. Of course a good thing to do is to cut 1/2 a inch more then the tight length to allow for the shaft to not bottom out. It's really easy to figure out just make sure the shafts never bottom out. I have pics etc; just trying to figure out how to get them on here.

Thanks, MD... I figured I'd need to cut 1/2 from each side... my biggest concern was if the shaft would be too short and put a bind on the u-joints and shafts when raised.

 

Smitty


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#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2015 - 03:35 PM

[quote name="Utah Smitty" post="575613" timestamp="1432055821"]Thanks, MD... I figured I'd need to cut 1/2 from each side... my biggest concern was if the shaft would be too short and put a bind on the u-joints and shafts when raised.

Smitty[/quote

Your on the right track cutting from both sides. When I bought the tiller for my ford the PTO shaft was too long and needed cut down.
I made sure about 1/2 of the inner shaft was in. The sleeve and it is pretty short on my ford.
I will take a tape down to the shed and measure it for you. Mine measures 24 inches from the face of the slipper clutch to the end of the pto that goes on the pto. it is close I sometimes have to adjust the top link to hook it up.

Edited by JD DANNELS, May 20, 2015 - 03:43 PM.

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#9 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2015 - 05:36 PM

[quote name="Utah Smitty" post="575613" timestamp="1432055821"]Thanks, MD... I figured I'd need to cut 1/2 from each side... my biggest concern was if the shaft would be too short and put a bind on the u-joints and shafts when raised.

Smitty[/quote

Your on the right track cutting from both sides. When I bought the tiller for my ford the PTO shaft was too long and needed cut down.
I made sure about 1/2 of the inner shaft was in. The sleeve and it is pretty short on my ford.
I will take a tape down to the shed and measure it for you. Mine measures 24 inches from the face of the slipper clutch to the end of the pto that goes on the pto. it is close I sometimes have to adjust the top link to hook it up.

Thanks... that's a similar measurement to mine--25" is the shortest dimension between the groves in the shaft on the tiller and the PTO.

 

Smitty







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