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1920 Beeman


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#1 jtrojek OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 10:49 AM

I just picked up a second Beeman, this time a 1920. It's mostly complete and original. It's missing a side panel and the rear wheels (the ones that are on there are from my other Beeman - I just put them on to make it roll easier). I doubt the mag is original.  Before I bought it I had thought of using this one for parts for my other one, but now that I've seen it, it's far too nice to use for parts so I will attempt to get it running.   It even has some original paint on there still. I'm hoping that this one with relatively little trouble, whereas my first one (the 1918) is a major tear down project.

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Edited by jtrojek, May 18, 2015 - 10:58 AM.

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#2 tiretrx ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 11:43 AM

Not familiar with these, but it looks to be built like a tank. Those wheel/fly wheel/PTO castings are incredible. Congrats, and thanks for sharing :thumbs:


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#3 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 11:49 AM

That's a nice looking tractor, Jamie. Glad to hear you're going to keep it original. The spark plug these use are 1/2" NPT similar to a Model T plug. Not sure what the actual original number was but they will run on about any plug. There should be enough room in there for about any reach.


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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 12:55 PM

Nice find! That is coming up on 100yrs old!  A real classic! 


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#5 Mike Unwin OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 12:58 PM

Good idea Jamie keeping it together , really like the muffler the whole unit reminds of a self propelled stationary engine. Should run great with the large flywheels. Another great find. Cheers Mike


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#6 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 01:26 PM

 the whole unit reminds of a self propelled stationary engine. . Cheers Mike

 

The early beemans were actually sold as a walking engine. If you wanted the cultivating/gardening tooling it was extra cost.


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#7 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 02:05 PM

Wish I could find one of those around here.


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#8 jtrojek OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 02:47 PM

Hey, Doug: the clutch does work, though it's a bit sticky.  What's involved in unsticking it?  If it's anything like most mechanical things, I suspect it may loosen up a little if used (though maybe not), but what all is involved in unsticking one, just in case it gives me grief?  Do I have to take the whole thing apart for such a procedure or is there a simpler way?  Also, is there anything different that I need to do with this machine to get it ready to try to run it, or is it pretty much the same as any other machine I own when I first get it (ie. change the oil, put in a new plug, clean the carb, clean the points and give it a try)?  Well, I know that I'll need some antifreeze too, but does that also create some other things i need to look into before I start it up?  Do I need to check the head gasket in some way to make sure I don't have a serious problem before I start it up?  I just want to make sure that I don't mess something up, something that if I only would have known I could have avoided.  Or, am I better to take the whole things apart and go over it first?  I'd really like to have it ready to go to the shows this summer if possible, though not at the expense of doing something ill advised and wrecking it.  This machine is a bit of a learning curve for me.  By the way, the instructions posted in the Manuals section of the forum for these are quite neat.  I enjoyed reading about how after a day's work of 10 hours, you should drain the oil, let it sit overnight, then dump it through a strainer 80 strainer, and then put it back in the machine, adding fresh oil if necessary.  A lot of the instructions are very different and very interesting.


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#9 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 06:02 PM

I think I would at least take the plate off the bottom of the crankcase and try to get a light up in there to check it out. You should be able to turn it around and reach the rod to check for slop in the bearing. If it's real rusty in there, I would opt for a tear down. Otherwise, just clean it out best you can and put fresh oil in it. The book says a quart and a half but actually it should say about a pint and a half. There is a petcock to check for full. Make sure the hole in it isn't plugged up. How's the compression? i'd just clean the plug. If it is the take apart style you could always clean it later if it doesn't fire. Clean the points on the mag and see if you can get it to fire. A little rust on the faces of the clutch may atually keep them from sticking. They may be worse when they are polished up. I'll try to get some pics of the clutch parts and can explain it better then. It will make more sense that way.


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#10 Mike Unwin OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 06:19 PM

I would just use water at first in case of leaks internal or otherwise,good advice to check the sump .


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#11 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 08:15 PM

It wouldn't scare me to fire it up without any coolant. Short runs of 5-10 min shouldn't hurt it. There's a lot of cast there to heat up. If you see puffs of exhaust coming from the rad then you know you have a problem.


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#12 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 05:07 AM

Super cool!  I love the age and crude nature of the machine.  It looks like something you would find in the Smithsonian. 



#13 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 05:25 AM

What a great looking tractor :thumbs:    I can't believe that it almost 100 years old



#14 jtrojek OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 11:23 AM

You guys are awesome.  Thanks for the advice.  I'll hopefully start working on it this week.



#15 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2015 - 06:14 PM

Let's see if I can make sense of the clutch. There are a lot of places for it to stick and this is the first one. The shaft has to go up inside the hub and it has to be able to spin free of each other. the buttons hold it from coming apart but allow it to spin. I've also seen flat inserts in there. They serve the same purpose just different. The hub has a tapered surface on the outside and it drives the right hand wheel while the shaft will drive the left.

 

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The next piece is the main drive gear. It slides over the hub and keeps the buttons from falling out. This is another place that couild stick. I'd think these places would improve with use. This gear runs off the crankshaft and the cam drives off this gear. I think the crank is 11-12 teeth so you can see the mechanical advantage you woud have to break something over a stuck valve or mag drive. The gear has tapers on both sides that drive the clutch hubs

 

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The next hub has the taper on the inside to engage the drive gear and is the only one that has a fork to operate it. It is keyed to the shaft driving the left wheel and has to be able to slide on the key and shaft. The instructions say to pull the lever back half way to release one side for turning and all the way to release both wheels. When you pull this hub back, the drive gear has to float away from one side or the other. There is no positive way to disengage the drive gear from the taper. I think a lot of sticking problems are caused by the taper sticking to the drive gear. This could be where the polished tapers hurt you because the oil would help create the suction to hold the tapers intact.

 

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The last piece is the apply spring that forces it all together. This spring has to collapse enough to allow a backing washer and pin to go through the shaft. My 270 lbs can barely push the spring down. It requires putting the assembly in a press and collapsing the spring to remove the pin. I know of one collector that used a ighter spring here in an effort to keep the clutch from sticking. It helped but didn't totally eliminate the problem.

 

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