Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Bolted together wheels?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,770 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted May 16, 2015 - 03:26 PM

I just bought this:  Vigaro Nursery Wagon - $30 (Willimantic, Ct)

<>
00x0x_jYnxk1fXdTN_600x450.jpg
Vigaro nursery wagon, missing a wheel.
Have 4 extra tires.
Has pull handle or can be pulled by a tractor. Large plastic tub dumps.
30" wide, 44" long, 6" deep.
 
I have avoided bolted together wheels for many years. Now, I have to deal with them. Do I have to take the wheels apart to take the tires off, or just change the tire like a regular wheel? Thanks, Rick

 


  • tinbender7, Traill95, classic and 3 others have said thanks

#2 DougT ONLINE  

DougT

    Dog Approved

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 584
  • 5,720 Thanks
  • 4,280 posts
  • Location: north central Ohio

Posted May 16, 2015 - 03:44 PM

I think they are easier to deal with than a regular rim. I always take them apart. Air the tube up, lube it with soapy water or the regular tire lube and put the halves back together. I wiggle them a little as I go back together to try to seat the tube and feel for it. If the inner rim is nasty use an inner liner for the tube. You can make one by cutting an old tube.


  • Alc, tinbender7, CRFarnsworth and 5 others have said thanks

#3 LilysDad ONLINE  

LilysDad

    Cat Lover

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10443
  • 9,634 Thanks
  • 7,671 posts
  • Location: N. Illinois, DeKalb County

Posted May 16, 2015 - 03:54 PM

Are they any better than the riveted rims? I know of a man who was killed while inflating a badly rusted riveted rim.


  • Alc, tinbender7, boyscout862 and 3 others have said thanks

#4 classic ONLINE  

classic
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 52970
  • 3,455 Thanks
  • 1,605 posts
  • Location: New York

Posted May 16, 2015 - 03:59 PM

I take the rims apart to install new tires on the bolt together rims. Install the tube in the tire then install the rim half with the valve stem hole.Pull The valve stem through the hole and either wrap some tape around the stem or lightly hold it in place with vice grips.I then squeeze the tire together with big c clamps until the beads nearly touch protecting the tube. I then install the other rim half and tighten down the bolts. You can then safely inflate the tire without worrying about having the tube pinched between the rim halves. Remove the tape or vice grips and you're done.

Edited by classic, May 16, 2015 - 04:00 PM.

  • DougT, Alc, Traill95 and 2 others have said thanks

#5 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,770 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted May 16, 2015 - 04:01 PM

Are they any better than the riveted rims? I know of a man who was killed while inflating a badly rusted riveted rim.

The truck split rims were bad too. I saw a man and his adult son cut in half by a split rim letting go while being inflated 46 years ago. After that I always chained the wheels. Good Luck, Rick

 

I will take all of these apart, sandblast and paint them and then reassemble them with new bolts. The cart is going to be for the wife to use in the garden and maybe for me at swap meets.


Edited by boyscout862, May 16, 2015 - 04:03 PM.

  • Traill95, LilysDad, TomLGT195 and 2 others have said thanks

#6 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

Bruce Dorsi

    Old, but not dead -- yet!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1525
  • 3,172 Thanks
  • 2,143 posts
  • Location: New Jersey

Posted May 16, 2015 - 04:11 PM

 

I will take all of these apart, sandblast and paint them and then reassemble them with new bolts.

 

I also coat the rims with anti-seize compound where the tire bead will contact the rim.  .....This helps greatly in preventing rust from gluing the tire bead to the rim, and will make it easier for you the next time you have to change a tube.


  • Bolens 1000, Alc, Traill95 and 4 others have said thanks

#7 CRFarnsworth ONLINE  

CRFarnsworth

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 6275
  • 3,642 Thanks
  • 1,734 posts
  • Location: Rossville Illinois

Posted May 16, 2015 - 05:23 PM

I think they are easier to deal with than a regular rim. I always take them apart. Air the tube up, lube it with soapy water or the regular tire lube and put the halves back together. I wiggle them a little as I go back together to try to seat the tube and feel for it. If the inner rim is nasty use an inner liner for the tube. You can make one by cutting an old tube.

:yeah_that:  :iagree:


  • DougT, Traill95, boyscout862 and 2 others have said thanks

#8 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

holdenboy1960
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62113
  • 1,472 Thanks
  • 819 posts
  • Location: Queensland , Australia

Posted May 17, 2015 - 08:06 AM

bolt together rims are a lot easier i think & with that ,there is no bead tear getting them of the rims & back on & to interfere with sealing back on the rims ECT , 

i have both sorts & get along with both sorts 

P.S. i got split rims on my small truck & i do all my own Tyre repairs .........but very careful when inflating them , i have an extended inflate hose so i'm not close to the split 


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#9 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,770 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted May 17, 2015 - 10:31 PM

bolt together rims are a lot easier i think & with that ,there is no bead tear getting them of the rims & back on & to interfere with sealing back on the rims ECT , 

i have both sorts & get along with both sorts 

P.S. i got split rims on my small truck & i do all my own Tyre repairs .........but very careful when inflating them , i have an extended inflate hose so i'm not close to the split 

Wrap them in a chain so that nothing can go flying. I inflate them and let them sit for awhile, just incase. The above incident was not exaggerated, the two men were in 4 pieces. I can still see them even though it was 42 years ago. 30 years ago my neighbors' 1960 Ford Cabover blew a wheel. The ring flew across three lanes of highway traffic and into the woods. Luckily no one was hurt. They can go pretty far. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, May 17, 2015 - 10:32 PM.

  • holdenboy1960 said thank you

#10 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

adamjd200
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 39654
  • 1,392 Thanks
  • 1,528 posts
  • Location: central Ny

Posted May 21, 2015 - 08:59 PM

Wrap them in a chain so that nothing can go flying. I inflate them and let them sit for awhile, just incase. The above incident was not exaggerated, the two men were in 4 pieces. I can still see them even though it was 42 years ago. 30 years ago my neighbors' 1960 Ford Cabover blew a wheel. The ring flew across three lanes of highway traffic and into the woods. Luckily no one was hurt. They can go pretty far. Good Luck, Rick

We have the "locking ring" split rims on our manure spreader, always chain them in  2 or 3 spots with good heavy chain can't be too careful.  A lot of tire shops won't touch these rims due to the increased liability they pose.


Edited by adamjd200, May 21, 2015 - 09:01 PM.

  • boyscout862 and holdenboy1960 have said thanks

#11 Leonard VanCamp OFFLINE  

Leonard VanCamp
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62684
  • 235 Thanks
  • 196 posts
  • Location: Mount Bethel PA

Posted May 21, 2015 - 09:39 PM

The military still uses split ring rims, most of the time we had tire cages but in a field situation we would slide them under the nearest local dozer or scraper. The biggest thing with those rims was that the split ring wasn't stretched or warped and the mating points of the ring and rim were clean and free of rust. 


  • boyscout862 and holdenboy1960 have said thanks

#12 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,770 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted May 21, 2015 - 10:58 PM

The military still uses split ring rims, most of the time we had tire cages but in a field situation we would slide them under the nearest local dozer or scraper. The biggest thing with those rims was that the split ring wasn't stretched or warped and the mating points of the ring and rim were clean and free of rust. 

I was a combat engineer bridge building platoon leader. The cage was never available to us so we chained them in 4 places(per SFC Marr my PS). We had those huge tires that made the duce and a halfs look small. SFC Marr was blown up and then run over by a 5 ton in Nam(before I knew him) so, we were very carefull about everything. He got to retire as a MSG and was a civlian instructor at Ft Leonard Wood in the early 90s last I heard. Good Luck, Rick


  • holdenboy1960 said thank you

#13 Leonard VanCamp OFFLINE  

Leonard VanCamp
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62684
  • 235 Thanks
  • 196 posts
  • Location: Mount Bethel PA

Posted May 22, 2015 - 04:44 PM

What unit were you in Boyscout? I did 2 years with the 502nd Engineers (assault float bridge) in Germany in 90-92, Lay Ho, Heave!


  • holdenboy1960 said thank you




Top