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1050 PTO Input Shaft Still Hard to Turn


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#1 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 06:24 PM

Bought this 105 about a month ago.  Found the PTO shaft was seized so started soaking it in BP blaster.  Have kept it wet ever since and not making much headway.  I can move it with a channel lock plier on the pulley bracket with a lot of p[pressure.  The lever for the PTO is free.  The tractor drive arm and pulley is free.  So it has to be hung up either at the steering column or the front end . At this point I don't think any more soaking is going to accomplish anything but keep everything wet.  Dismantling half the tractor just to get this shaft drove out does no appeal to me at all.  Any other suggestions?  I would really like to get this PTO working as this tractor is one of the better running tractors I have.  Runs real nice and responsive, shift is nice a smooth, clutch is smooth and easy, steering is positive with very little play.  Just that forsaken PTO shaft messing thing up.

 

What next ? ? ?  :wallbanging:   :mad2:   :deadhorse:



#2 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 07:53 PM

Here are two suggestions I will offer but they are presented as "USE AT YOUR OWN RISK".

One would be to hook up an arc welder at very low amp setting by connecting the electrode end at one end of the rod and the ground clamp at the other - this will generate an electric current though the rod creating heat - similar to how they used to thaw out frozen water pipes years ago - the danger is that you could melt the plastic bushings, get things too hot and start a fire (please don't) and the heating may crack the cast pieces (not likely but 50 year old metal can do strange things. Would suggest cycling the arc welder on and off for 30 seconds at a time and then working the shaft back and forth and see if the heat is helping.

Second suggestion would be to drill a small 1/8" hole through the pivot points ( would have to drill through the transmission top over the steering column pivot and then the pivot at the rear pivot) and then squirting some oil into the holes and working the shaft back and forth. The small holes drilled should allow lubricant into the bushings without affecting the strength and could always be welded over if you ever decided to put the tractor back to original. I have attached pictures from when I redid my 1050 to provide you with a good view of what things look like covered up and uncovered. I would guess it is the pivot at the steering column that is causing the problem. I think ( but have not actually tried) that you can get an extension and socket up from the bottom underneath the tractor and undo the two bolts that hold the front pivot to the main plate ( I think they are 5/16" bolts with 1/2" heads) If you cannot get at them this way then you could undo the front drive shaft nut and undo the four bolts that hold the front bearing support plate on and remove it the same as if you were changing the belts. Then you should be able to get at the bolt heads with a wrench - it may be tight between the drive pulley and the main plate but I believe there should be enough room. If you undid them then it should allow you to move the rod and see if the rear pivot is still binding or if it is the one that is seized up.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Top View Through Battery Box.jpg
  • 2 Side View Between Pulleys.jpg
  • 3 front Pivot Point.jpg
  • 4 Rear Pivot Point.jpg
  • 5 Rear PTO Pivot before.jpg
  • 6 Front Pivot before.jpg
  • 7 Front Pivot Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 8 rear Pivot Cleaned Up.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 06, 2015 - 08:07 PM.

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#3 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 08:35 PM

The PTO unit is held on with three bolts to the back side of the front axle. Just slide back the belt guide, undo the the 3 bolts and then slip it out of the belts.

 

I assume this is what you are referring to.

 

00303_dogQ7SlQhaG_600x450.jpg


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#4 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 08:40 PM

Well, I see another post was made while I looked for an image. Hope you have the help you need now. Good luck.



#5 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 09:25 PM

I had thought of drilling the hole like was mentioned but those bushings are real thin and it would be hard to tell when you got through the pivot and not into the shaft to far. Guess it wouldn't really hurt much though. Also thought of using a torch and heat that pivot points up some. Guess I was thinking in the right direction but always better to get advise from someone who has been there already.

The PTO unit is held on with three bolts to the back side of the front axle. Just slide back the belt guide, undo the the 3 bolts and then slip it out of the belts.
 
I assume this is what you are referring to.
 
00303_dogQ7SlQhaG_600x450.jpg


It is the shaft that operates the pulley that tightens the belts to turn that piece that is seized. PTO unit needs seals but I have others that are ready to go on.

#6 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted May 07, 2015 - 11:20 AM

Going to try drill an 1/8" hole in the two pivot points.  Picked up two new double ended bits this morning.  After I get it freed up will grease it good.  I have an attachment that goes on the regular gun tip that I use for greasing a grease sealed bearing. Has a fine point on it and puts out real small stream of grease.  Not worried much about looks as it isn't going to any museum.  It is a working tractor.



#7 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 07, 2015 - 07:09 PM

Have one other suggestion if that does not work - Loctite has a product out called Freeze and Release - http://www.henkelna....elease-7008.htm . Not sure how much it goes for in the U.S. but I have sold it to a couple of customers and both said it worked for them - one had a seized in bearing that he could not heat because open flame would have caused a fire. Which style of needle do you have for your grease gun? There is one that is cut on an angle and designed to pierce the seal and another one that comes to a point and can be inserted into the ball of a regular grease fitting (this is the one I would recommend as it will seal against the hole better). Good luck

Attached Thumbnails

  • Cut On An Angle.jpg
  • Pointed.jpg

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#8 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted May 07, 2015 - 07:28 PM

Thanks for the tip 26 Chev. Will check on it tomorrow. Auto parts store may have it. The adapter I have for my grease gun is similar to the right on in the pic. The whole end of the gun socket goes into the tube and locks onto the zerk like piece inside. The point is round so it should seal into the hole fairly easily. Will use an air power grease gun so it get a quick shot. Not as much volume as a regular gun but it get it there a lot faster.
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