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Small scale Milling with a Bandsaw


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#1 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2011 - 11:03 AM

I brought grandpa's old Bandsaw to my house. It had been at dad's since grandpa passed away and hadn't seen much use.

I did a little maintenance on it then gave it try cutting some walnut and apple that I had set aside from the wood pile.

I cut the walnut at 4/4 and the apple is about 8/4. I plan on making a bandsaw box out of the apple.
Posted Image

I need to do more tuning on the saw, but this could be fun making some small boards out of trees on my property.

#2 tractorgarden OFFLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2011 - 11:21 AM

Thats something that I always wanted , but never had. I am sure you will get your use out of it. Shawn

#3 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 01:42 PM

I do a bit of milling myself, and I think it's almost as addictive as GT collecting.
I bought an abused mill, fixed it up because I wanted to build a small cabin.
Did that.
Then I found myself trying to think of things to build because I had the mill/wood.
I find it relaxing to slice up a log, and it's good exersise out in the fresh air.
My bandsaw mill is a Norwood 2000. I'm always amazed at how well they work. You can actually make veneer.
What mill do you have?

Here are some pics of my mill/logging.
I use a Twin track Alpine with a big winch on it to haul the logs
out of the bush. White pine, and hemlock, and the odd cherry.
Posted Image
I got a 16"x12"x10'3" out of that. Great for a mantle.
Didn't have the heart to slice it up. That was 2 years ago.
I still have it.
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About half of what I pulled out in a week in Jan. this year.
I'm actually going to fire up the mill in the morning.
I think that for now I'm just going to turn the logs into
oversized cants till I figure out what sizes I want.
That keeps the bugs out once the bark is gone.
Posted Image

#4 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 01:58 PM

Those are awesome pictures. By small scale I was talking about a 14" bandsaw.

I wish I had a mill like you do, I am just getting really into wood working and dont want to pay the high prices at lowes for hardwoods.

I just cut up a cedar tree that was blown down in a ice storm over the winter. I am going to try and cut some 3' long planks from it to build/line chest with.

#5 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 02:44 PM

Ah, that kind of bandsaw milling.
Before I got the other mill I got one of these at a woodworking show.
Built specifically for what your doing.
I used it several times on some 4"-5" cherry.
Worked pretty good.
I think it's called "The Little Ripper"
Very adjustable for clamping your log.
If you weren't across the border, I'd sell you mine for peanuts.
Nowadays, it just collects dust.
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#6 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 02:55 PM

I just googled it.
Wow have they ever gone up in price.
I paid about $90 about 5 years ago.

#7 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 02:59 PM

do you frequent any wood working forums? I have been hanging out at Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum for a few months now.

#8 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 03:09 PM

do you frequent any wood working forums? I have been hanging out at Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum for a few months now.


No, I don't.
A few years ago, I did spend some time in a forestry forum while I learned about milling.
Interestng thing, those guys are just like tractor dudes. Pretty inventive.

Do you already have something like that ripper, or how are you holding your wood?

#9 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 03:18 PM

So far I have just free handed the piece in to get 2 mostly flat sides (not starting with round logs but with quarter sections), Then I am using a crude fence I made, I have been marking a board at the thickness I want to cut the log to and then freehand cutting that line to about half the length of the board, then I turn off the saw while holding that board in place and slide my fence over a locking it down. I am doing that to account for drift.

I am needing to replace some parts on the saw to help it's performance, (guides and thrust bearing, may also replace the tire material)

#10 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2011 - 04:05 PM

So far I have just free handed the piece in to get 2 mostly flat sides (not starting with round logs but with quarter sections), Then I am using a crude fence I made, I have been marking a board at the thickness I want to cut the log to and then freehand cutting that line to about half the length of the board, then I turn off the saw while holding that board in place and slide my fence over a locking it down. I am doing that to account for drift.


Watch your fingers, and that pc. doesn't rock on you, and bind. Good way to brake
the blade.

You know, it wouldn't be that hard to make a crude little ripper.
Needs a bit of fine tuning, but the price would be right.
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#11 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2011 - 07:19 AM

That ripper sled looks like it would be handy. I need to do some more tunning on the saw, Like I said above Grandpa has used it hard and it needs all the guides and bearings replace.

#12 KIRO-1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 06:40 AM

No band saw blade cuts perfectly straight. When my Dad(a cabinet maker for 45 years) taught me how to resaw on his 14" he would free hand in 8" stop the saw (leaving the wood in place) take a fine point marker and draw a line on the base plate following the peice of wood. Then remove the piece from the saw. Then he would clamp his fence on the base plate lining it up with the marker line. After that he could resaw every piece nice and straight as long as the grain held true. Hope this helps.

Ross

#13 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 08:02 AM

No band saw blade cuts perfectly straight. When my Dad(a cabinet maker for 45 years) taught me how to resaw on his 14" he would free hand in 8" stop the saw (leaving the wood in place) take a fine point marker and draw a line on the base plate following the peice of wood. Then remove the piece from the saw. Then he would clamp his fence on the base plate lining it up with the marker line. After that he could resaw every piece nice and straight as long as the grain held true. Hope this helps.

Ross


Ross: That's kind of how I have been doing it.

#14 Justpics OFFLINE  

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Posted June 09, 2011 - 02:53 AM

I have a grizzly band saw that will rip up to 12" high wood. the key other than what is mentioned is to use as wide of a blade as the saw will take. in my case 3/4" wide.




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