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diaphagm trash pumps?


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#1 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2015 - 09:52 PM

I got this from a buddy a few years ago as he was getting ready to move away (boo/hiss)  as he could not take all his stuff with him...

 

From what I can find out it is late 50s/some time in 60s,   it is a Homelite Diaphragm pump.

 

2 cycle engine (didn't homelite build their own at one time?)

It has been sitting here a few years untouched, but when I got it I pulled it over and it had a bright blue hot spark.  I pulled the carb and (I think I did anyway) bought a kit to rebuild it, knowing it had sat a while even before I'd gotten it.  the guy I got it from, had gotten it from his old job when they closed their doors, he was in maintenance, and could only ever remember this thing being used very few times in his 20-som years of working there. The paint and decals are still nice, they had it around for "just in case".

 

Anyway a couple questions; IF I get it running, would it hurt to run the engine without it trying to pump water?  I'd like to have it running for the same reason the old company had it... living in an area w/a "high water table"  my sump pumps have been known to die, and I have had to pump out the crawlspace by other means to be able to get to the sump pumps (I run 2 of them) it would be nice to have, especially since my neighbor talked me out of the newer pacer pump that I used to have/ but I need to test run it to be sure it would work when that time comes

 

According to a decal on the engine it calls for a 16:1 gas/oil mix. Really?  Even the oldest outboards I have had only ever called for 24:1 and they even said that with newer oils that they could be run at 50:1. though I never did so. (I usually only play with Evinrude/Johnson outboards) how bout Opti Mix?

 

would this pump be self priming?

How "powerful" were these?  How well did they "move" the water?  Be OK drawing from about 4 ft deep? (I am on a crawlspace, I would run that Pacer pump I had, from right next to the foundation at a crawlspace vent window) No, I have never had that much water under the house, but the cawlspace is about that deep

 

It has a Tillotson HS 45 carb.  any pitfalls to boiling one out and kitting?  (I ask on account of having dealt with too many tecumsehs over the years to even try and remember them all)



#2 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2015 - 10:12 PM

Not sure about the carb., Homelite did build there own engine.  As far as 16:1 oil mixture some of the old saws I have call for 12:1, since I have so many different saws I use synthetic oil that is designed to work for all ratios with just one mix.  Pro Mix from Lowes is a good choice, as well as Arnold brand from TSC.



#3 Bruce Dorsi ONLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2015 - 10:12 PM

Generally, diaphragm pumps (also known as "mud suckers") are self priming and can be run dry without damage.

 

However, if the pump has been sitting unused for a long time, it would be worth trying to pump some water through it.  ...I have one and the diaphragm is cracked from sitting.

 

16:1 fuel mix was not unusual on older 2-strokes.


Edited by Bruce Dorsi, April 23, 2015 - 10:13 PM.

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#4 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2015 - 10:14 PM

I can't tell you about the pump part but I think 16 to 1 oil was the norm for lots of old 2 cycle engine .If I remember right my dad just used engine oil.I don't if there was a 2 cycle oil back then.


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#5 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2015 - 10:19 PM

I can't tell you about the pump part but I think 16 to 1 oil was the norm for lots of old 2 cycle engine .If I remember right my dad just used engine oil.I don't if there was a 2 cycle oil back then.

The oil used for this would be 30W non-detergent, still available at most gas stations, Advance Auto has it in several brands as well as TSC.


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#6 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2015 - 04:07 AM

Agree on the diaphragm pump....Made to run dry, but eventually the diaphragms will crack and not pump.

I have probably 20 air operated diaphragm pumps in my industrial waste water treatment plant   1/2" up to the big mother 3"


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#7 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2015 - 07:26 AM

The pump may be simple enough that a new diaphragm can be cut from a piece of tire tube. It may not last very long, but it is a field expediant that will give you a start. Good Luck, Rick



#8 framesteer OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2015 - 08:26 AM

In high school, I worked a couple of summers at the local natural gas compressor station.  They had a monster (at least 18" round) diaphragm pump with an 8hp briggs on it.  It would pump just about anything that was even close to liquid.  You definitely didn't want to cover the intake with your hand - I'm sure it would have crushed it.  It wasn't reall fast, but very powerful.






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