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#1 rumbleseat OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 09:14 PM

I have several old traffic lights, the old metal, more decorative kind and am currently working on saving another from 1926.  It's a cast piece, but I have managed to mill (with the help of a buddy) missing pieces and some hardware to save it. Here are some photos of where I started and where I've been and where I am at with it.  I still have a ways to go. (the pics didn't load in order but you'll get the picture).

 

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#2 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 09:25 PM

That's an awesome piece especially what you had to work with. Do you have others you could share. Is there a lot of info available to restore these.
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#3 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 09:29 PM

Nice work! 


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#4 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 09:32 PM

Beautiful job!

 

I have a lot of respect for a guy who can take a piece like that with little to no information available and turn it into something beautiful.

 

Ben W.


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#5 rumbleseat OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 10:05 PM

That's an awesome piece especially what you had to work with. Do you have others you could share. Is there a lot of info available to restore these.

There are old photos, original signals, sales brochures and collectors out there to get info from. 

Here are a few more I have.  I have more photos somewhere I'll upload later

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#6 classic ONLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 10:08 PM

Incredible job you did with the restoration! The craftsmanship and design of things from that era are great to look at.
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#7 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 12:04 AM

Looks good! Our historical traffic lights here are boring...


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#8 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 04:59 AM

Neat old lights!


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#9 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 06:47 AM

I really appreciate your work and desire.  I have recovered an railroad crossing signal with shed.  Lights and bell work but eliminated the cross arm part as it was busted up to bad.  I now have an old cast iron search light signal with the ladder and platform to go up.  The K-2 operator  to change the color was removed but the lenses for magnification are still there and good.  FYO they operate on 17 Volt power.  The shed holds a bank of batteries to operate the signal for 24 hours without outside power.


Edited by chieffan, April 12, 2015 - 06:49 AM.

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#10 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 09:07 AM

Very nice work and restore job!

 

I guess many, many years ago we only had red stop and green go...No yellow for those of us that go through an intersection on "pink"!!


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#11 Littledeere OFFLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 10:12 AM

Looks great


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#12 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 10:40 AM

Nice work. What are the large brass things you are holding in your hand. If I had to guess I would say they are feet?


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#13 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 01:21 PM

Wow, very nice work and I really like your collection.


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#14 rumbleseat OFFLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2015 - 04:06 PM

Nice work. What are the large brass things you are holding in your hand. If I had to guess I would say they are feet?

Thanks.  Those brass things started out as round brass plugs and were put on a lathe and threaded on one end (that's the photo you see in the hand).  Then we put them in the CNC machine and made the brass thumbscrews out of them.  The one photo of the three thumbscrews shows an original one in the middle and new ones by it.  I couldn't find any original ones and needed 32 of them, so me and buddy made some out of round bar stock from a metal yard.

 

Others are right that the concept of the yellow light was a later edition and first signals were red/green.  They did devise an overlap of the two colors that worked as a "yellow". Meaning the green would phase to red and green before going to red only.

 

 

Thanks for all the compliments. Here are a couple more of the old signals that I have or have had..

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Edited by rumbleseat, April 12, 2015 - 04:07 PM.

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#15 rumbleseat OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2015 - 08:24 PM

https://www.youtube....h?v=pt7YeLYvlLo

 

Here's an older video I shot of the flasher box operating the beacon.  It runs off of 110 volt, powers two magnets that spin the metal disk, which turns a series of sprockets and gears, which in turn rocks a cradle containing a mercury switch. The mercury in the switch sloshes forward to the switch contacts, lighting the light, then rocks back moving the mercury away from the electrical contacts within the switch, stopping contact with the line and shutting the light off.  A lot of moving parts just to flash a light bulb.


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