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Why you should always scrub the bore with hot water and detergent after honing.


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#1 classic OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 12:01 PM

I'm rebuilding the engine for my Allis B1 and I honed the bore and set the valve lash. I cleaned and scrubbed the engine in a chemical parts washer. A white rag came out clean as a whistle when I wiped out the bore. I then washed the block off with hot soap and water and scrubbed out the bore with a brush. You can see the honing residue on the rag after the first soap and water scrub. I had to scrub and rinse the bore twice to get a rag to come out spotless. This is a critical step to insure that your rings will last a long time after assembling your engine.

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#2 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 01:19 PM

Good point, but I never do it. I spray with brake clean to clean the bore, but soap and water would be better.  Noel 



#3 M.Cain OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 01:41 PM

I use starting fluid  to clean I try to avoid the moisture due to flash rusting when done I coat inside of block with oil after cleaning.


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#4 classic OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 02:14 PM

I understand the worries about flash rust, but washing with hot soap and water is a must if you want the honing stone and iron particles gone. I had no problems with rust flash since I dried the block immediately afterwards. You can use compressed air, then a heat gun or a hair dryer. I set the block on the wood stove for a little while and it dried in minutes. You can use brake clean, gas, or anything else, but this will not get the grit out of the bore no matter how clean you think you got it. Sure, the engine will run fine, but the life of the rings will be shortened without a hot water and detergent scrub.
I never used to scrub out the bore with hot water and detergent years ago, but when a machinist buddy of mine mentioned it to me, I followed his advice. The reason that I made this thread, was to show how much residue remained after thoroughly cleaning the block in a parts washer, and that it wasn't good enough. I'm thinking that the hot water expands the pores in the cylinder, releases the grit, and the detergent helps wash the particles away. To each his own, but I'll never assemble an engine after honing without a hot water and detergent bath.

Edited by classic, April 10, 2015 - 02:15 PM.

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#5 ckjakline ONLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 02:41 PM

I understand the worries about flash rust, but washing with hot soap and water is a must if you want the honing stone and iron particles gone. I had no problems with rust flash since I dried the block immediately afterwards. You can use compressed air, then a heat gun or a hair dryer. I set the block on the wood stove for a little while and it dried in minutes. You can use brake clean, gas, or anything else, but this will not get the grit out of the bore no matter how clean you think you got it. Sure, the engine will run fine, but the life of the rings will be shortened without a hot water and detergent scrub.
I never used to scrub out the bore with hot water and detergent years ago, but when a machinist buddy of mine mentioned it to me, I followed his advice. The reason that I made this thread, was to show how much residue remained after thoroughly cleaning the block in a parts washer, and that it wasn't good enough. I'm thinking that the hot water expands the pores in the cylinder, releases the grit, and the detergent helps wash the particles away. To each his own, but I'll never assemble an engine after honing without a hot water and detergent bath.

 

Good point.You should always scrub brake rotors and drums after you turn them on a lathe for the same reason.


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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 03:12 PM

I've heard it said that you should always do the detergent and hot water bit. I wonder how many shops actually do it. My guess is not many these days. 


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#7 M.Cain OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 03:27 PM

Would dipping in a hot tank overnight be better?   Just wondering


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#8 petrj6 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 03:49 PM

    I went thru all that on my b-10 engine some 10 years ago and it is still running like a top.  last year I rebuilt a motor for dads b-10 and we had the engine bored and I honed it myself, I left the washing and cleaning to dad.  he must not have got it good enough and I never checked it, before the end of the summer it was smoking so we tore it down again and found the bore to be worn a bit and the oil pan had allot of sliver dust in it.  wore bad enough to put a step in the bottom of the bore.

   warm soapy water and a clean white paper towel !!  there is no substitute !!


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#9 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 07:18 PM

And from what I remember, after you cleaned a carburetor, it was washed in soap and water , then rinsed in water, then blown dry with air gun. Noel.

In a hot tank it should be washed because you don't know how dirty the cleaner in the tank is??

Edited by propane1, April 10, 2015 - 07:21 PM.

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#10 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 07:20 PM

That's the way it is done around my operation!

 

Ben W.


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#11 stiemmy ONLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 07:26 PM

I use starting fluid  to clean I try to avoid the moisture due to flash rusting when done I coat inside of block with oil after cleaning.

Flash rusting can be totally prevented with compressed air immediately after washing.

 

I used to work for an electric motor rewinding shop, and even they washed with hot water/degreaser, then the parts were blown off with compressed air. Never had a flash issue.


Edited by stiemmy, April 10, 2015 - 07:26 PM.


#12 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2015 - 08:28 PM

I always felt like the solvents break down the oil & dirt residue when cleaning. The hot water & detergent carries everything away.

#13 Trav1s OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2015 - 06:30 AM

Thanks for this thread. Will keep it In mind when my k301 goes back together.




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