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#1 FrozenInTime ONLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2015 - 10:45 PM

I probably read it on here, but I did read it somewhere so today I am giving my seeds the test.  I have lots of seeds from the last 3 years and I know the viability dies off some yearly, so here goes nothing.  I hate to waste seeds.  What I did was count out 4 seeds from each packet and wrap a wet paper towel around them.  I have them in the kitchen where the temp usually stays 67-69 degrees.  I'm hoping they start in 10 days so I can see if they are good or not.  Is this the correct way to do this test?  Spinkle some warm water on them daily to wake them up?


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#2 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2015 - 05:22 AM

Here's a site that has some guide lines , I made a copy to keep with seeds .

http://www.webgrower...oring.html#Days

 

Forgot the page that tells how to test

http://www.webgrower...ermination.html

 

 

I planted some tomato seeds 3 days ago from about 12 different seed packs , some where pretty old 4 years + I figured I would put extra seeds in each cell pack since they were so old . I found some from 2008 , just tossed them lol


Edited by Alc, March 24, 2015 - 05:28 AM.

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#3 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2015 - 12:00 PM

That is pretty much what I do too. Perennial flower seeds I put in the freezer for a week or so and then dampen to break dormancy.
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#4 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2015 - 07:45 PM

I never carry seeds over from year to year but there is certainly nothing wrong with doing it. A friend works for Earl May and his job last fall was to take all the returned seed packets, open them and they were blended in with the next years packets. There is nothing on the seed packets that states when the seeds were grown, only that they were packaged for 2015, or what ever year.
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#5 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2015 - 03:44 PM

I like the heirloom seeds.


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#6 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2015 - 12:56 AM

I never carry seeds over from year to year but there is certainly nothing wrong with doing it. A friend works for Earl May and his job last fall was to take all the returned seed packets, open them and they were blended in with the next years packets. There is nothing on the seed packets that states when the seeds were grown, only that they were packaged for 2015, or what ever year.

      No wonder some companies don't guarantee germination!! It never occurred to me that that is what happens to unsold seed. I must be the last of the innocents--- or maybe just gullible--- to me that is bordering on dishonest.


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#7 FrozenInTime ONLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 10:58 AM

Update:  Did a germination test, I'd say 80% failed.  Tossed them all, going to hit the stores and pick up new - organic seeds.  I hope this also means they are non-gmo.


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#8 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted May 06, 2015 - 12:34 PM

  Good luck with getting the varieties you're after, seeds are getting pretty picked over up here already.


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#9 FrozenInTime ONLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2015 - 11:55 PM

Went to several places in town on Sat., they were picked over hard.  Today I went online to an organic farm here in ND and ordered a bunch of seeds.  It's a little more spendy, but I've used their seeds for a couple years and loved the end results.  I will pick up a couple packs in town for a few other seeds, radishes/carrots, etc on Tues when we go back to town.  It's still too early to plant here, It is going to be below 30 degrees a couple nights yet this week; watched 1.5 days of rain coming down so far this weekend, sooooo, we are waiting for atleast another week or so.  We have not even picked up plants from the nursery yet, any of those planted round here, I see no way they have survived if put out.  So, with this bad weather we have going, I have been working hard on the chickens.  I've got 2 incubators running full tilt, working on inside of coop so I can separate the young peeps from the old gals.  They won't accept new peeps, last time they killed the newbies.  Mean old hens, so lots of coop work this week.  The way things are going, the garden might be a little sparse this year.  I'm putting probably half atleast under buckwheat.  I've spread a lot of chicken manure in that half.  After it starts coming up, I'm putting the mean hens in there fenced off from the rest of the planted garden.  After they get all that dug up/fertilized/mulched up, I'll move them off and then til, then replant with some white clover.  I don't know if this new area will be amended well for next year, or if I will do it this way for 2 years.  This area has only had grass/weeds in it for 30ish years and it's getting pretty thinned out.  So, I'm doing this to organically bring the soil up, I HOPE!


Edited by FrozenInTime, May 17, 2015 - 11:57 PM.

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#10 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 05:21 AM

Are you planting the buckwheat for the chickens to eat or some as a cover crop ?  I got tired of my main garden being so weedy I'm not using that area  (50 x 35 ) this year and trying to reclaim it lol . I tilled it about a month ago then in between then last week once more , harrowed in some buckwheat , hoping it comes up and smothers the weeds . Only thing I heard that you have to till it under before seeds set .


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#11 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 06:55 AM

Does it really matter if your seeds have been raised organicly?



#12 FrozenInTime ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2015 - 10:23 AM

Using it as a cover crop, the seed heads for chicken feed, the stalks for organic matter till'd under.  I will turn the chicks loose on it as the heads start up, they can knock it down and eat them.  Between that and the chick poop left behind, and the clover's ability to convert the nitrogen I'm hoping for a decent garden next season or the following at the latest.  Ground is too hard right now, root veggies just push up out of the ground.  Might dump a load of sand in with it when I till it up next time.


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#13 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted May 19, 2015 - 01:03 PM

We have a lot of natural peat moss up here, acres and acres of it. Often a farmer will scrape a thin layer off where there is too much on the field and just windrow it---- most are quite happy to let gardeners take a 1/2T load. It works in beautifully to lighten up clay or hard, lumpy soil. 


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#14 FrozenInTime ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2015 - 12:25 PM

I was thinking of mixing in a few bales of peat from Lowe's when the time comes.  I'm going to do a soil test before I do it to make sure I'm not messing up the soil too bad.  This place was built 40 yrs back, previously it was farmed.


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