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Subsoiler


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#1 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2015 - 08:28 PM

I have a new bota 4 wheel drive, 23 horsies.  Have a tiller for it too.  The soil I'm fixing to turn is a mixture of clay/sand/hard dirt... LOL.  I don't have a plow, yet, may not get one but I need to break it up some I'm feeling before roto tilling.  My question is, how deep/long of a subsoiler should I build?  I have the metal, welder and what not.  Just wondering how deep with this machine be able to pull one without a whole lot of trouble?


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#2 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2015 - 08:44 PM

I'd build it for 3 feet of depth with the hitch all the way down knowing that is more than optimistic.  Then you regulate the depth with the 3 point by what traction you are getting at the time you use it. 

 

I'd also take lots of pics of the build to post on GTTalk!   :thumbs:


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#3 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2015 - 08:47 PM

I had built a tool bar cultivator to use kind of like a subsoiler. My goal was to get an inch or two below my tilling depth. Now my tiller just sinks lower. :D  It also lets me get in and break up the ground earlier in the wet spring. Helps dry it out before tilling.


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#4 mrmd OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2015 - 08:48 PM

I have a 16 horse Allis B 212 and I wanted to play like I had a big cat. I built a contraption with 2 inch square tube and mounted an Anhydrous shank that I found in the junk yard to it. As its mounted it will go 14" deep but I doubt I could pull it thru fresh ground. I don't think a regular plow will go that deep.
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#5 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2015 - 08:58 PM

Here is what I made.

 

 

Posted March 24, 2012 - 01:01 PM

Finally got it welded together the other weekend.  :dancingbanana: Had an interesting time trying it out, was wishing my garden was twice as big. Found I could pull 5 about an inch to inch and a half deeper than my tiller. When I was done trying different depths and spacings, the ground was that loose I lost traction.post-6172-0-38990600-1332608009_thumb.jp 
 

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#6 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2015 - 10:43 AM

There is really no need to go much below 18 inches unless you want to bring up clay and gravel to mix with the top soil. I built one and after using it I have mixed feelings about the results. When you break up the subsoil any moisture your garden receives will tend to pass quicker through the till zone and down. On the other hand if you use your subsoiler in the fall snow melt will tend to stay in the soil and not run off which is a good thing. If you subsoil below the black dirt than one tends to mix undesirable dirt with the nutrient rich top soil.  

  On new ground I don't think I would go more than a few inches below your tilling depth. This would make tilling much easier and you would not be bringing up unwanted soil. 


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#7 bryan 110 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2015 - 09:02 PM

I think what would help you better is to make a ripper. Like some of the others said only go a inch or two lower then the tiller would go. Not to start anything but 3feet is way to deep for a tractor with 23 hp. I think if I was you I would make a 3 shank ripper. Ripper teeth sink maybe 10 inches in the ground.
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#8 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2015 - 10:41 PM

After giving the design more thought, I'd like to change my answer slightly.

 

Park the tractor on level ground and raise the hitch all the way up.  Measure from the lift arms to the ground.  Subtract 4 inches for clearance during transport.  That is how long you can make the subsoiler.  Any longer and you can't raise it high enough to clear the ground when not digging.     

To me,  a subsoiler is always one shank - the object is to get deep. Two or more shanks will restrict depth.

You will still have to regulate depth with the hitch.


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#9 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2015 - 11:44 PM

Making a chisel plow, or 3 tooth ripper makes sense.  I don't need to go real deep, I just want to loosen up the soil a bit so when I run the tiller, it's not a hard fight.  Y'all think I could pull one with 3 tips 10 inches in hard packed soil is possible with my bota?  I could do one, 2, 3, etc.  I'm thinking one like shorty built would be the ticket.



#10 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2015 - 07:11 AM

When I used mine, it was in an established garden just first time for that year. I am thinking that if you are breaking up sod or ground that is hard packed. You might have to drop down to just ripping a few inches at a time. 


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#11 IHCubGuy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2015 - 02:02 PM

On a regular chisel plow built for farm tractors the horsepower figure that is used is between 10 to 15 Hp per shank.  And a regular chisel is going down about 8 to 10 inches normally at most.  

 

A real subsoiler on the other hand takes around 50 Hp per shank to pull.  Even for a mini subsoiler I don't think you would want more than one shank.  You can get small single shank three point subsoilers for category 1 and 0 hitches.


Edited by IHCubGuy, March 22, 2015 - 02:02 PM.

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#12 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2015 - 04:05 PM

On a regular chisel plow built for farm tractors the horsepower figure that is used is between 10 to 15 Hp per shank.  And a regular chisel is going down about 8 to 10 inches normally at most.  

 

A real subsoiler on the other hand takes around 50 Hp per shank to pull.  Even for a mini subsoiler I don't think you would want more than one shank.  You can get small single shank three point subsoilers for category 1 and 0 hitches.

 

 

I know it takes alot to pull a real chisel plow.  I can't count the times last fall, pulling a 32 ft cp with a 340 horsie Challenger, hitting a wet/hard spot in da field snapped me to attention (er, wake me from day dreamin) faster than I could slam a clutch.  Gets hard sometimes re-starting a hot tractor that just came to an instant stop from full throttle... LOL.. ouch.... learned alot last year.

 

I'm not sure yet what I'm going to do, it may just be one shank to go an inch deeper than I can roto till.  I may copy that tool bar though, I can think of a few applications it would come in handy.



#13 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2015 - 04:44 PM

You can use two shanks and space them so on your next pass one of the shanks is running between the two furrows made on the precious pass. This will make it pull easier and will do a better job breaking up the soil because your direction of travel will be opposite the last pass. 


Edited by Cvans, March 22, 2015 - 04:45 PM.

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#14 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2015 - 05:51 PM

You can use two shanks and space them so on your next pass one of the shanks is running between the two furrows made on the precious pass. This will make it pull easier and will do a better job breaking up the soil because your direction of travel will be opposite the last pass. 

 

Darn good Idea!  Place each shank right after the tires might just be the ticket, then do as you mentioned, move half a row and go other direction.


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