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#1 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 12:27 PM

      I'm wanting to make a fairly large raised bed for a "kitchen garden" to put close to the house. Ideally it will have just stuff I want to use every day, radishes, lettuce, a few herbs, onions, chives, cucumbers etc., pretty much salad stuff and a few edible flowers like nasturtiums and pansies. A friend has given me a bunch of pallets to use but I'm needing a construction plan to hold the sides together... I have a few ideas but could use some input. I'm planning on something two or three pallets long and a pallet wide (for ease of weeding and picking) but am open to suggestions.


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#2 Jack ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 12:39 PM

Here is what I did. Even made a system to have it water its self. Worked pretty well. I think I will double its size this year. We didn't really get a lot of food from it but it was fun just working with it.

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#3 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 01:37 PM

I'm not clear on the concept of Raised Bed?  I would think unless it was table height and you didn't have to bend over to reach things to work them, it has NO use that is better than a reg garden?  I see in second post, that one is in small containers, guess one could work them on a table or keep moving about to reach, but still is low as it sets.  I don't see keeping animals out, they can climb up I'm sure. Would be hard to have the weight table height and need much more support than others, but still seems that is what a raised bed should be.  For older folks who can't bend well or handi-cap maybe?  Clear Me up if I am Missing the whole reason.


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#4 3v0 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 02:30 PM

The sky is the limit on what you can do.

 

I built this raised bed this fall and will be planting it in the spring.  I also built this planter/(raised bed) from old fence posts and used 1" boards.  

 

2014-11-26%2015.06.22.jpg2014-06-25%2014.24.27.jpg

 

The raised bed is odd shaped because it is covering 3 boxelder tree stumps I can't easily dig out.  Their roots are wrapped around a water main.  With luck they will rot away by the time anyone opts to get rid of the raised bed.  Many of the blocks were scavenged from a building that burned.  Not much strength but enough for the raised bed. 


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#5 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 02:33 PM

   The idea is for ease of reaching the produce and weeding, water conservation, and yeah, saving my old back from too much bending. I had hoped to set the pallets on edge, line it with plastic on the sides to contain the growing medium and moisture, almost fill it with compost, manure/straw, fill the top with 6 to 8 inches of good soil , and plant away. The compost creates heat and nutrients. The height should be about three feet to be convenient for me- I'm a bit vertically challenged, lol- and it is not intended to be my main garden, just a small one close to the house to be handier than going all the way out to the main garden.


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#6 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 03:03 PM

I have a possible access to a bunch of skids, may do the exact same thing.s I had thought to cut skid in halves or 1/3's and set up right then screw them all together to make my boxes. The wrap insides with roll roofing or roofing paper to help hold dirt in. 


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#7 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 04:13 PM

I see the blocks and posts on here that look more usable then.  Some posts with bed up high and nothing under might be OK. Must have to have a little open to have water flow down when it rains? But, will the roots and some dirt just keep trying to fall out the cracks on bottom?  OR, is it lined and just has one drain? This type has a better appearance then. The blocks would be good for more permanent isntallation, but might have to lean or step them in some to keep from pushing out when it all settles? Maybe metal fence posts down thru them if that would work?


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#8 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 04:59 PM

Here is kind of what I want to do. Takes away from plow time though :ah_shoot:

 

MayGarden6.jpg

 

wood-pallet.jpg

 

 

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#9 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 05:23 PM

Thanks Tahoe, that is pretty much what I have in mind. I'm just wondering how to anchor the corners so the weight of the dirt doesn't push the frame apart. I have a fishing auger with a dirt bit attachment so I can sink some posts in at the corners and maybe one halfway down each side to keep them in line. With loose pack compost and sitting on dirt I shouldn't have to worry about it getting waterlogged. The rolled roofing is a good idea too to keep the dirt in, as long as it isn't tar or oil impregnated to make it waterproof--- don't know if that would be good for the plants. The idea of using metal rods down through the sides is something that hadn't occurred to me, much easier than putting in posts. Thanks glgrumpy.

#10 Jack ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 06:00 PM

Here is what I did. Even made a system to have it water its self. Worked pretty well. I think I will double its size this year. We didn't really get a lot of food from it but it was fun just working with it.


I guess the term "Raised Bed" doesn't really apply to what I was doing here. I just did mine this way because I had the stuff and if it didn't work out I could just pick the stuff up and move it. Did not have to plow up the yard etc. I guess it really is what you might call a container garden
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#11 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 06:31 PM

If you don't want to use tar paper find some erosion control fabric or landscape fabric.A good hardware store should sell it by the foot. 


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#12 3v0 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 06:33 PM

I see the blocks and posts on here that look more usable then.  Some posts with bed up high and nothing under might be OK. Must have to have a little open to have water flow down when it rains? But, will the roots and some dirt just keep trying to fall out the cracks on bottom?  OR, is it lined and just has one drain? This type has a better appearance then. The blocks would be good for more permanent isntallation, but might have to lean or step them in some to keep from pushing out when it all settles? Maybe metal fence posts down thru them if that would work?

The bottom of the planter with the posts is redwood slats.  It is lined with landscape fabric to keep the soil in. Lots of linseed oil and polyurethane  to keep the inside from rotting too fast.

 

On the block raised bed I tamped earth into the block holes then drove rebar into the tamped earth.  It might be overkill.  I did the last six feet of wall without rebar to see.

 

I may add another course of bricks.


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#13 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2015 - 09:30 PM

As my Olde Deere used to say, "why use a 2" nail to do the job when you have a 4" spike?" I'd just as soon have overkill than have the sides push out half way through the season. Too much work involved to have to start the project over.

#14 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2015 - 05:42 AM

TAHOE those beds you made look great !!!  I'm going to try making one for my strawberries , the plants can go in between the slats and runners too  



#15 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2015 - 07:16 AM

TAHOE those beds you made look great !!!  I'm going to try making one for my strawberries , the plants can go in between the slats and runners too  

 

Oh, sorry, I didn't make them. Those are just google pics I linked for examples for Mrs OD.

 

Mrs OD, the rebar is a good iea, even just tying corners with some heavy rope should hold the corners together or 4x4 post in the corners anchored to the skids.

 

If I can get ahold of enough skids, I would like to do like pic #1, but that is a lot of dirt to fill. I have a regular garden, but the taller tress have gorwn over the years and a lot of it is now shaded. I can make some raised beds up inteh back of the yard that just grows grass and then both my mom and wife would not have to walk down the steep hill, but yet still be able to raise some 'maters, cukes, and some other smaller plant veggies.....and less grass to cut :thumbs:  I can put the potatoes,beans, and spreading stuff in the other garden.


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