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Horse Power?


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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 08:25 AM

About 70% of farmers here in Lancaster County use mules for working the fields, while the remaining 30% use modern day tractors. Those farmers that use the mules, always seem to be working the fields and have their corn planted a lot sooner than those using modern day tractors. When I asked one of the local farmers that uses tractors, why this is the case, he states that the tractors are much bigger than the mules, and will get stuck more easily than the mules will. The mules cover more area so all of their weight isn't concentrated to just a little area like a tractor would be. He also stated that a tractor has either two wheels or four wheels that drive, but never the less, the wheels are in line front to back, so they are pretty much using the same path. A team of 6 mules on the other hand, are covering a width of say 12 feet wide, and can not only distribute their weight across an area more uniformly, but they also have more traction as they aren't following each other in a single line. Makes sense I guess.

 

Anyhow, that got me to thinking. Engines and Motors have always been rated by the amount of horse power they produce. Someone along time ago, decided that they can tell how many horses it would take to be equivalent to each size engine or motor. Are they accurate on their assumption? Is one horse equivalent to a one horse power rated engine or motor?

 

What's your thoughts?


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#2 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 08:37 AM

I can't prove that theory, but when you consider the power a horse wields I think an engine would be over rated just a guess. But picture the power of one Clydesdale, its hard to imagine that a one hp Briggs could be its equal.
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#3 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 08:37 AM

Hmmm . . .   I bet a horse can out pull a 5 horse engine.


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#4 Nxt2doc OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 08:38 AM

As I understand it one horse power is the power needed to raise 55o lbs. one foot in one second or 33,000 lbs. one foot in one minute. I'm guessing it had to come down to an accurate measurement to quantify this for measuring and this is what they came up with.


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#5 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 08:41 AM

I've thought about this from time to time but never did the math.  I would think that one horse power in an engine should equal one actual horse but, once you add a drive line in and anything else that isn't part of that engine, the power would diminish.  In effect, you would actually need more horse power to equal one horse's actual power.  Don't even get me started on the different horses out there.  I know nothing about horses but I would assume that they all do not have the same strength.  This is all me making assumptions, no proof of anything here.  It just makes sense in my twisted head.  I have a bigger problem with todays engines that I don't want to bring up here for fear of steering your thread in another direction.


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#6 3v0 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 09:15 AM

For the most part an engine will pull the same all day long 7 days a week.  A fresh horse can produce a lot of burst power but over longer periods it comes closer to what we think of as engine HP.  Add this to the fact that not all horses are the same and the current definition for a horse power is not unreasonable.   

 

IIRC the notion of HP was based on horses used to pump water from mines.  I imagine they used at least two teams alternating them. If you think about the cost it is easy to see why they replaced horses with engines.

 

Packing is an issue.  My cousin has one of these beasts.  

 

2012-8-23-Case_IH_Introduce_New_Steiger_


Edited by 3v0, March 03, 2015 - 09:17 AM.

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#7 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 09:57 AM

Upon thinking some more . . .  It's probable the deep thinkers of their day were struggling with the issue of how to compare the ability of engines to do work. When they got their formula down they had to call it something. The smart folks now days are working on computers and such. Look at the stupid names they come up with. A mouse...   Bing...   Google...  


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#8 crittersf1 ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 10:49 AM

Upon thinking some more . . .  It's probable the deep thinkers of their day were struggling with the issue of how to compare the ability of engines to do work. When they got their formula down they had to call it something. The smart folks now days are working on computers and such. Look at the stupid names they come up with. A mouse...   Bing...   Google...  

Cookies.


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#9 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 11:21 AM

Cookies.

 

 

Now you are making me hungry!!

 

 

 

Geno


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#10 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 11:32 AM

I've thought about this from time to time but never did the math.  I would think that one horse power in an engine should equal one actual horse but, once you add a drive line in and anything else that isn't part of that engine, the power would diminish.  In effect, you would actually need more horse power to equal one horse's actual power.  Don't even get me started on the different horses out there.  I know nothing about horses but I would assume that they all do not have the same strength.  This is all me making assumptions, no proof of anything here.  It just makes sense in my twisted head.  I have a bigger problem with todays engines that I don't want to bring up here for fear of steering your thread in another direction.

 

 

The driveline is definitely a power user. As for the horse, at a steady work rate a horse can keep going for quite some time. Like any living being burst power will be strong but short lived.

 

As far as the comparison goes, the farmers using the mules sound like they have it figured out. Around here it seems the large tractors are all that is used and some years they have to wait for the fields to dry before the planting can begin. With all the hybrid seed being used it does not seem to matter how soon the planting happens anyway.  JMTCW

 

 

 

 

Geno


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#11 Coventry Plumber OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 03:29 PM

I just saw a show on that subject and the mathamutishion claims one horse it equal to 15 HP. They also claim it would take at least 30 men to beat 1 horse in a tug of war. Can I get 29 other men from GTT that want to try with me?

Norther Tom

Edited by Coventry Plumber, March 03, 2015 - 03:32 PM.

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#12 superspeedex OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 03:40 PM

In the nebraska tractor test they have a category on how much slip between tires


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#13 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 04:04 PM

I think it has to do with the gearing, from the engine, to the work done. Driving wheels, belts, pto, etc.   Noel


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#14 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 04:58 PM

Are we talking Horse Power or Torque?

 

Work = D (distance moved) x F (force applied)

 

 

Power Explained
Torque and work measurements tell us how much has been accomplished, but provides no clue how fast a given amount of work (or torque) is done. That's the job of power, an expression of the rate or speed at which work is performed. The more power that is generated, the more work is done in a given time-period.

Suppose it takes a constant 100 lb-ft of torque to spin a nut onto a bolt one complete revolution. Your girlfriend takes 10 seconds to do this. You, being a real stud (pun intended), take only 5 seconds to perform the same task. You would be twice as powerful, because you performed the same work in half the time.

 

There are so many weird terms and physics involved. 

 

Work, Power, Torque, Horsepower...


Edited by toomanytoys84, March 03, 2015 - 05:14 PM.

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#15 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2015 - 05:04 PM

If we're talking torque then we got to consider the knee & the hoof :)
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