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Air compressor under load, how much is too much?

air compressor sandblasting

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#1 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 03:37 PM

Some will remember the air compressor thread that went on way too long from a couple years ago and while I could have resurrected it, I thought it would be better just to post a new thread with some new questions now that I am able to put it to good use.

 

Since getting the air compressor together the most it has done is run air tools like a die grinder or the impact. It has always done well with those. I used it once with the pot blaster doing some sandblasting and it didn't phase it either but then the amount of sand I had in the pot didn't really allow me to run it for a prolonged period of time.

 

Now with the sandblast cabinet and being able to use the air continuously it has me curious to how hard I can work the compressor. I don't know how hot the compressor itself can get either. For on / off mode I have it setup to kick out at 140 psi and to kick in at 95 psi. When using it this way with the sandblaster I could get it to kick in and out at least 20 times an hour. The compressor is able to build pressure while blasting but takes it a while to build up to kick out from kick in pressure while blasting the whole time. 

 

If I put it on continuous run, it unloads at 135 psi and loads at about 110 psi. I think there might need to be more separation between unload and load but it seems to work nicely. It doesn't take it long to build up to unloaded state even while blasting on continuous run. The only thing that worries me is the compressor temp. Do I really need to worry about it?

 

 



#2 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 03:56 PM

When we were doing the big tractors, we set a big fan up and blew across the fins in the same direction as the cooling fan normally would.  It seemed to help.

An old squirrel cage out of a furnace would do, big box fan might help. 

 

If someone knew what the top end OK range temp was, you could get a thermodisc to put inline with a light to come on (or go off) as a warning


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#3 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 04:42 PM

What's an air compressor?   :smilewink:


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#4 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 04:45 PM

What's an air compressor?   :smilewink:


:bigrofl:
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#5 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 04:46 PM

Your compressor should be rated for continuous duty.  But if compressor is in a confined space, and especially in very hot weather, an added cooling fan would be good.  You just wire the fan into your starter contacts so it comes on with the compressor. Even a small squirrel cage fan would cool a lot....say a fan out of a cook stove hood.  But I think you will be fine without the added fan.


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#6 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 05:03 PM

You should be OK the way it is now, George.

 

That's if your compressor pulley has fan blades and blows the air over the compressor.  ....Sometimes the belt covers are there to direct airflow over the compressor, as well as keeping fingers out of the belts.

 

My compressor will get too hot to touch while blasting, but that is normal.  ....If the compressor oil is getting up to 220*-230*, then I would be concerned.

 

My electric company LOVES me when I am blasting stuff. 

 

I have only used medium grit glass beads in my cabinet.  ....While they are slower to remove heavy rust, I can also blast soft metals without having to change media.


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#7 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 05:14 PM

Mine is off at 120 and think not on till 80? not sure. It runs pretty much constant while blasting, cept when moving parts out or other things, so blasting stops. It will got hot to touch, but no smoking, knocking or such. I DO sometimes let it set for awhile and work it on/off as I go.  Flywheel on pump is a fan, think that is enough. I've never added more fan, even in summer. Think the water builds up and gets in sand and stops you more than anything. I have filters, but they fill fast. After a few hours the rig plugs many times and I know it is just time to quit for the day. If you have the spotlights in cab, they warm up when closed up and can dry it out or help at least.  Just a note on spotlights.....if You bump one with a part, most times it will blow out!  Keep some spares on hand. Some brands don't hold up well, others are  better, just try diff ones.


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#8 HANKG OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 05:30 PM

Not really sure George, but when in doubt, let the wind be your friend I hope that helps.


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#9 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 05:44 PM

Most I've seen have fans on the pulley for keeping cool. I have a 60 gal. 4 hp upright that I run hard. I usually like to SB a few parts at a time, walk away, empty water trap if needed, gather more parts etc. This gives the compressor time to catch up or cool off. 


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#10 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 05:51 PM

It does have fan blades on the flywheel. We have it in the one corner of the garage close to the wall but there is still plenty of space for air movement. I think I should be alright running it non stop, just want to be cautious if I can. When it was running continuous with the auxiliary unloader the pump was hot but I could keep my hand on it for a couple of seconds so it couldn't have been too hot. Also the motor was only warm to the touch in one area and the rest was still cool.



#11 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 06:21 PM

I don't think you have to worry about it overheating in 2* temperatures do you?  Move it outside if you do..


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#12 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 08:18 PM

I would be more concerned about duty cycle for extended runs.  Overheating is only a part of that.

 

Ben W.



#13 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 08:27 PM

I would be more concerned about duty cycle for extended runs.  Overheating is only a part of that.

 

Ben W.

 

As large a compressor as this one is, I'm fairly confident it would have a true 100% duty cycle.


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#14 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 09:45 PM

George, I've seen your Compressor and it will run continuiosly without any issues. I doubt you will ever run it over 10 hrs or so on a 100+ degree day as I do the one I have that's the same compressor hear that you have. If you think it gets too hot in the summer, use a small fan as others have commented on. Yout good to go.


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#15 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2015 - 10:10 PM

If your going to be blasting for extended periods I would set it to run continually (using the unloader). This will use less power and should keep the motor cooler as your using very little power while its unloaded and the motors internal fan will be cooling the windings. 







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