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Wood Ashes In Garden ?


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#1 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 12:42 PM

This is the Fourth season that I've had my sizable Vegitable garden and I have allways heard of the use of wood ashes in the garden as a additive to plants and read about it on line but never used it before.
Well, This winter I saved my ashes From My 2 Wood Stoves and i have a 55 gallon Drum allmost Full to Add To the garden this spring....Have any of you ever done this before and if so any advice you have would be greatly appreciated....Thanks, DanO'

#2 nra1ifer OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 01:00 PM

I throw mine on the garden spot. Not sure I've ever done a 55-gallon drum worth, though. Ashes are very alkaline, so apply accordingly.

Here's a link to some reading on the subject. Pros and cons, just like anything else:

Paghat's Garden: Fireplace Ashes
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#3 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 01:33 PM

Good source of potash.

#4 thecoater OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 02:00 PM

Good source of potash.


X2
you can mend them into the soil in the begining of the season and also at about 2/3 weeks before harvest for abit more boom to the garden at the end of the season

#5 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 02:27 PM

I've used them for years, as stated, just be aware of the ph level. Soil test is the best way to be sure. Take samples to your county extension office & advise them you want to use wood ash, when you get the report, it should then tell you how much ash to use. ~~ grnspot

#6 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 04:47 PM

I throw mine on the garden spot. Not sure I've ever done a 55-gallon drum worth, though. Ashes are very alkaline, so apply accordingly.

Here's a link to some reading on the subject. Pros and cons, just like anything else:

Paghat's Garden: Fireplace Ashes



Thanks, That's a Good Site...I've checked out a lot of others and many tend to contradict the other But will definitely test the soil & use them sparingly this first year, see how it goes...I knew there were sone Cons to it, and that's realy what I wanted to hear from actual users.
We've allways collected our ashes and used them in place of sand on the icey driveway but this year it was mostly snow not ice that's why I have soooo much left over.... We been "Recycling" long Before it was a Household Word.

#7 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 06:12 PM

Thanks, That's a Good Site...I've checked out a lot of others and many tend to contradict the other But will definitely test the soil & use them sparingly this first year, see how it goes...I knew there were sone Cons to it, and that's realy what I wanted to hear from actual users.
We've allways collected our ashes and used them in place of sand on the icey driveway but this year it was mostly snow not ice that's why I have soooo much left over.... We been "Recycling" long Before it was a Household Word.


That is the first I heard of using ash on ice. Does it work good? Doesn't it make a mess or does it just wash away pretty easily?

#8 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 06:33 PM

Done it for years, When the Ash Sits in a Pail outside in the cold absorbing some of the moisture in the air it gets hardened just enough to use it without it being messy, I also add the pails of Creosote that I get from Cleaning out the Chimney 3 to 4 times a season, to give it a little more grit and when it warms up, yes it just washes away. I have a Long Gravel Driveway, I'd be spending a fortune on sand if I Bought it, and Yes, It works well, Granted Definitely Not as Good as Course sand but for us Woodchucks, it's FREE !!!! And Free is Allways Good.

#9 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 07:32 PM

I use it on my gravel drive too. The wetter the ash gets, the darker it gets, soaking up the sun to melt snow & ice, besides having some grit! ~~ grnspot

#10 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 07:36 PM

I just wanted to throw something out there. If you burn anything other than wood in your wood burner, i.e. color print ads or plastics, you may not want to use it on your garden. Most colorful inks use some kind of heavy metal in their pigments and plastics break down into harmful chemicals when they burn. Just my $.02!

#11 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 07:50 PM

I just wanted to throw something out there. If you burn anything other than wood in your wood burner, i.e. color print ads or plastics, you may not want to use it on your garden. Most colorful inks use some kind of heavy metal in their pigments and plastics break down into harmful chemicals when they burn. Just my $.02!


Absolutely Right...I Burn Just Wood From Harvested Trees, that's what My Ash consists of...You definitely can't think about putting ashes from other Burn sourses in the garden, too many Toxins in P.T. Wood, Painted or varnished wood, other burnable junk...

#12 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2011 - 08:26 PM

My ground is so poor, I have to sit on a sack of fertilizer just to raise an umbrella!

:mecry: :itsok: :mecry:

#13 WQDL753 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 12, 2011 - 04:13 AM

I use it on my gravel drive too. The wetter the ash gets, the darker it gets, soaking up the sun to melt snow & ice, besides having some grit! ~~ grnspot

Yep, I focus on the path from the back porch to the carport though.
If you burn coal, the ash from that really does wanders for the driveway.




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