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Plow Shear Sharpening


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#1 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2015 - 05:20 PM

The plow is probably one of the most neglected attachments for our GT's.  Only used in the spring or fall and the rest of the time they just sit or lay around.  With spring on the way now is a good time to get the plow out and get it ready to go to work.  I removed the entire bottom from the beam of my Gardener this morning.  In the shop where it was warm I used the wire brush on the 4" grinder to clean it up.  Then a going over with Wenol polish it looks pretty good, till I turned it upright on a flat board.  The cutting edge of the shear was above the board by 3/16" of an inch.  It was sitting on the heal of the share.  In the ground this wold cause the plow to want to ride up out of the ground and be hard to hold down.  Would also take more power to pull it.

 

Clamping it up side down in my workmate I went  to work with the 9" hand grinder.  I started at the heal and started to grind the shear down flat so the cutting edge was parallel with the bottom edge of the landslide.  I kept work my way towards the point, using a straight edge to check the progress.  Within about 20 minuets with the grinder I had it looking good.  I turned it over and set it on the flat board again.  This time the entire cutting edge, except for a short area behind the point was in contact with the board.  This plow will go in the ground and pull good when the time comes.  As it was before it would have been a problem to keep in the ground and work right.

 

Many years ago, like back in the 40's and early 50's, my Uncle George owned a Blacksmith Shop.  In the spring he had one man that did all the plow shear sharpening.  He would have a big pile of shears laying about with names on the back for him to work on.  If they needed drawn out or re pointed my Uncle did that.  That is a lost art today.  In the 50's there was a replacement point and cutting edge that could be forced over the old plow shear and bolted on  They were about 3" wide and was quicker and cheaper than having them drawn out by a blacksmith.

 

Remember when sharpening your plow to make sure you sharpen on the back side and end up with the cutting edge flat with the landslide.

 

Plow-1.JPG                Plow-2.JPG

 

Plow Shine.JPG


Edited by chieffan, February 12, 2015 - 12:22 PM.

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#2 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2015 - 05:29 PM

Good Tips!

One other thing to mention is always grease the bare metal  when you plan to put it away for the season!


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#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2015 - 05:34 PM

Good Tips!

One other thing to mention is always grease the bare metal  when you plan to put it away for the season!

 

We always used a heavy wheel bearing grease rather than gun grease.  If was a thinker base and a lot sticker and stayed on a lot longer.  A lot of different things can be used to protect the shine or polish.  Use what you want but be sure you check it to be sure it is staying on.


Edited by chieffan, February 11, 2015 - 05:34 PM.


#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2015 - 06:15 PM

Nice writeup, thank you.
Do you happen to have any pictures that would help explain it for someone who has never seen it done?
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#5 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2015 - 06:50 PM

Thanks for the spring thinking.  Ground plow much better than snow plow .  Noel


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#6 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2015 - 07:36 PM

I believe that area behind the point is called the, suck. This helps keep the plow in the ground. I put new points on my ferguson tractor plow this year and got second place at the plow match. The year before I got last. !!! Noel
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#7 greenb69 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2015 - 10:58 AM

This is excellent information. I plan on getting a plow very soon and this information will come in handy. Pictures would also help.
Thanks for posting this.
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#8 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2015 - 12:23 PM

Nice writeup, thank you.
Do you happen to have any pictures that would help explain it for someone who has never seen it done?

 

I just put them up with the article.


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#9 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2015 - 09:17 PM

I'm not sure I'm clear on what is being done here.  Are you removing steel from the back side of the shear in order for the "sharp" edge of the plow to be flat on the board, or are you removing metal starting furthest away from the point so there is no "arch" between the point and the heel?



#10 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2015 - 08:47 PM

I'm not sure I'm clear on what is being done here.  Are you removing steel from the back side of the shear in order for the "sharp" edge of the plow to be flat on the board, or are you removing metal starting furthest away from the point so there is no "arch" between the point and the heel?

 

Sorry for the delay in answering your question.  Actually, both could apply.  Mostly your removing metal from the back of the shear to get the cutting edge as the first part of the shear to contact ground.  The landslide keeps the plow running parallel with the ground so you want your cutting edge of the shear to be even with the landslide.  As was mentioned the alight arch behind the point , or the suck, keeps the plow in the ground and again the landslide maintains and even furrow.  The only "arch" is the suck, right behind the point.  Hope this answered your question.


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