Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Tire chains?

chains power king 1618

  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 zuren OFFLINE  

zuren
  • Member
  • Member No: 65629
  • 37 Thanks
  • 49 posts
  • Location: MI

Posted February 03, 2015 - 12:58 PM

I have what I believe to be 4-link tire chains on the turf tires of my PK 1618.  The tractor is new to me, as is the driveway that I'm snowblowing.  The yard and driveway have many pitches to them and when running the tractor after this recent storm, I spent a lot of time with the tires slipping and grabbing.  I almost had it stuck a couple times.  I'm thinking I need chains with more links but wanted to ask what others are using for winter duty?

 

I'm considering going to a 2-link chain like shown here:

 

http://www.tirechain.com/8x16.htm

 

I have to drive the tractor from the barn through the yard to get to my driveway.  My driveway is blacktop so I'm not certain if i should go with medium duty, heavy duty or even the v-bar style chains for winter duty.  I want traction but do not want to tear up the asphalt (it's crappy asphalt but hope to redo it).  I also know I have to keep clearances in mind with the rear fenders.

 

Finding a set of rims with Ag style tires is also a consideration but have read that even they suffer in icy conditions.

 

Thanks for any advise!


Edited by zuren, February 03, 2015 - 01:00 PM.

  • Cvans and Coventry Plumber have said thanks

#2 Gtractor OFFLINE  

Gtractor

    The Tractor Hoarder

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 782
  • 6,612 Thanks
  • 3,912 posts
  • Location: Chillicothe, MO

Posted February 03, 2015 - 01:42 PM

Sounds like you need some weight first.  If you don't already have wheel weights or fluid in the tires you won't believe the difference it will make.  THEN if it still spins/grabs/spins/grabs you'll need to look at the two-link chains.  Any auto parts store can get new cross links for the chains you already have and you can install them yourself.  That would be 1/4 the price or less than the prices I saw in your link.

You'll need at least 75 pounds on each rear wheel - maybe more.  I have 100 pound weights on each rear wheel of my 1614 and it does great.

Good luck

:wave:

 

Of course my PK also has 280 pounds in the seat.  :(


Edited by Gtractor, February 03, 2015 - 01:44 PM.

  • Cvans and Coventry Plumber have said thanks

#3 MNGB ONLINE  

MNGB
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62466
  • 997 Thanks
  • 829 posts
  • Location: Minnesota

Posted February 03, 2015 - 02:04 PM

Hi I agree with Gtractor, more wt will help more than 2 link chains, I have 6 Gt's equipped with chains half have 2 link and the others are 4 link in the snow mud ice I can't really tell any performance difference between the 2 types but on hard surfaces like paved drives etc the 2 links ride a lot nicer.

Try more wt and if all else fails check into just buying the cross bars and installing them yourself.


  • Alc, Cvans and Coventry Plumber have said thanks

#4 zuren OFFLINE  

zuren
  • Member
  • Member No: 65629
  • 37 Thanks
  • 49 posts
  • Location: MI

Posted February 03, 2015 - 02:11 PM

Thanks for the replies.  Not to take my own thread off topic, but how useful would a Cat 0 rear blade be for moving snow and general landscape use on a Power King?  This would add weight and give me another tool for moving snow or dirt/gravel.


Edited by zuren, February 03, 2015 - 02:19 PM.


#5 MNGB ONLINE  

MNGB
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62466
  • 997 Thanks
  • 829 posts
  • Location: Minnesota

Posted February 03, 2015 - 02:46 PM

Hi a rear blade is great for dirt work grading a driveway etc while it will work to a degree for snow the problem is the snow builds up more and more to the rear wheel if you turn the blade completely around you can push with it but your always in reverse and looking over your shoulder, as for weight it will not help on the 3 pt as when you let the snowblower down the blade will come down also taking the wt off the tractor and just adding drag.



#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted February 03, 2015 - 03:13 PM

You can get just the cross chains at tire chains.com as well if you want to go to 2 link. Ice is mostly why I have chains. I don't use them unless I really need them. Haven't had to install them yet this year. Weight really helps and with turf tires I usually reduce the pressure to the point where the tire sidewall bulges a bit. This seems to increase traction. I think it allows the tire to conform to the surface better and also helps to clear the tread because it is flexing and moving more as the weight goes on and off a given section of the tire. It takes a while to get a handle on what works best for you driveway, tractor and snow conditions which can vary considerably from storm to storm. 


  • Alc and Coventry Plumber have said thanks

#7 zuren OFFLINE  

zuren
  • Member
  • Member No: 65629
  • 37 Thanks
  • 49 posts
  • Location: MI

Posted February 03, 2015 - 03:36 PM

Right now I have black ice under snow, so my use case is a little difficult right now on the black top.  But even in the lawn it struggled.  

 

I'm not sure that I want to load my tires due to needing to use the tractor to mow the grass in the summer.  I will either need to look into a ballast box or something like a HeavyHitch draw bar that accepts suitcase weights along with other accessories (lift forks, the cargo platform from my van, etc.).

 

Interesting comment about tire pressures.  I had read somewhere that you want the max air pressure to force the chain into the ground.  Either approach seems to make sense. 


Edited by zuren, February 03, 2015 - 03:41 PM.


#8 motobreeder OFFLINE  

motobreeder

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3989
  • 425 Thanks
  • 611 posts
  • Location: Eastern Ontario

Posted February 04, 2015 - 01:05 AM

Just my opinion.  I run loaded tires year round on my cub cadet.

 

The extra weight makes cutting the ditches safer and easier.

I expect the impact will be about the same as someone weighing an extra 150 lbs in the seat.



#9 TUDOR OFFLINE  

TUDOR

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 915
  • 543 Thanks
  • 497 posts
  • Location: Sault Ste Marie, Ontario

Posted February 04, 2015 - 03:04 AM

Hi a rear blade is great for dirt work grading a driveway etc while it will work to a degree for snow the problem is the snow builds up more and more to the rear wheel if you turn the blade completely around you can push with it but your always in reverse and looking over your shoulder, as for weight it will not help on the 3 pt as when you let the snowblower down the blade will come down also taking the wt off the tractor and just adding drag.

 

I plowed my driveway for 22 years with a MF1655 equipped with a 54" FEL bucket and a 5' back blade, both on the ground at the same time. The rear turf tires were ballasted with 160 lb of calcium each and 2 link chains. It pulled several cars and trucks out of the ditch and snow banks over the years,

 

Prior to that, it was equipped with a 48" 2-stage blower and the back blade, Both were used at the same time, even though each had its own hydraulic lift..

 

Minimum ballast on that tractor is 400 lb. What ever attachment is on the 3PH increases the ballast an additional 200 to 385 lb, depending on which implement. Tractor weight without an implement on the 3PH is 2000 lb, scaled weight, and it has run up and down the yard several hundred times in a 3 week period while I dug almost 100 yards of material out of my driveway. There was no effect to the grass that lasted more than 2 weeks.

 

I will grant that the soil is quite firm when reasonably dry. I keep the tractor off the grass at spring breakup or the day after an exceptionally heavy rain.

 

The tractor in this configuration weighs 2000 lb, plus a 210 lb operator. The hole that it's in is 3' deep, excavated by that tractor.

 

Bobinahole_zps3105ea86.jpg


Edited by TUDOR, February 04, 2015 - 03:06 AM.

  • Alc said thank you

#10 David Brown OFFLINE  

David Brown

    I said I work on them. I never said I fix them!

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8570
  • 4,217 Thanks
  • 2,314 posts

Posted February 04, 2015 - 05:36 AM

A properly weighted PK will do just about anything you ask it to do.  I had liquid filled tires and weights on both of mine when I had them.  Left them on year round.  You'll appreciate the stability it will give you when mowing.  I recommend Rim Guard if there is any place around that deals in that.  It's not expensive, it's safe for the rims, ground and pets (should you ever get a leak) and it's as heavy or heavier than calcium which will eat anything in its way.



#11 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted February 05, 2015 - 07:45 AM

Rim guard would be my choice for loading if we could get it here. They advertised for distributers a couple of years back but got no takers. I think the economics of trucking it from down south to this area made it too expensive to offer as an alternative to the more commonly used Calcium chloride solution. I went with weight brackets and weight plates. One practical reason was to keep the bare wheel weight down to a manageable level. If I need to remove a wheel I can remove the 180lbs of weight and be left with a roughly 100lb wheel with weight bracket. A 250lb loaded wheel is too much for me to handle on my own. It's not as big a deal with a 12" wheel but the weight can still get to the point where it's difficult to handle. 



#12 MH81 OFFLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,277 Thanks
  • 28,615 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted February 05, 2015 - 12:12 PM

The advice you've gotten in this thread is what I would say as well.
You need weight back there. The extra crossbars will smooth it out and maybe help a little bit, but you need gravity enhancement.

#13 zuren OFFLINE  

zuren
  • Member
  • Member No: 65629
  • 37 Thanks
  • 49 posts
  • Location: MI

Posted February 06, 2015 - 08:20 AM

Thanks for the replies.  There are a couple Rim Guard dealers in my area so I will look into it.

 

I included a pic of the tractor in winter mode!

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_2649.JPG

  • MNGB said thank you





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: chains, power king, 1618

Top