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Oil propane or electric?


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#1 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:02 PM

Ok guys. Question of the century.

Propane electric or oil for home heat? Wood is used to supplement on some days.

1300 Sq ft house reasonably insulated good windows.

I'm almost against oil as the price is a roller coaster. Last year 4.60 a gallon this year almost down to 2.00 a gallon! We go through almost 900 gallons a winter. So this year 1800 last year Almost 4000! I can handle 1800 but 4000 is tough to swallow!

I also plan to do some research on geothermal. Not sure on the cost of that stuff. Everyone I know who has it loves it. But I don't know the cost of installation.

Edited by toomanytoys84, January 25, 2015 - 09:25 PM.

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#2 Jack OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:17 PM

I just went electric from oil.   First bill should show up about any day now..  let you know how that goes..


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#3 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:18 PM

Let me know we should have similar Temps. You are down by Cincinnati

Edited by toomanytoys84, January 25, 2015 - 09:21 PM.

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#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:22 PM

I have a friend who changed to all electric. His provider gives a small discount to all electric houses. He has a heat pump with add on heaters. Seems happy so far.
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#5 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:30 PM

Electric Baseboard heaters are OK my neighbors house heats with those but he had to upgrade his breaker panel and upgrade to a 200 amp service.His house is roughly 2600 sq ft.He spent $3200 for heat but had the thermostat set at 67F.His house is not very well insulated.

 

 

Oil prices are all over the place.IMO I would go with Natural Gas vs Oil.It's roughly 25% cheaper than Oil.

 

 

If it was my place I would go with a Wood fired Boiler.You shouldn't burn any more than 10 cord of wood and wood is selling around here for $125 a cord.Total of  $1250 a year.If you are able to keep feeding the fire wood is the way to go.

 

1300 sq ft would be easy to heat with a Pellet stove.And even cheaper than Wood heat.Thing is with a pellet stove is that once the auger motor or control goes you will be without heat and it takes time to get the parts.

 

 

We heat with one of those small box shaped Suburban wood heaters with the optional blower.The house is around 1100 sq ft and very very well insulated house with some rather drafty 100 year old single pane windows.We burn 8-10 cord depending on how cold it is and I keep it pretty toasty all winter.between 72 and 80f even when it was -20 outside last winter.


Edited by EricFromPa, January 25, 2015 - 09:41 PM.

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#6 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:39 PM

Now that Eric mentions pellet... Those "crushed coal" stoves do a great job according to my cousin.
Once a day fill up and toasty warm. House about that size. His is in the basement so convection distribution of heat, but I guess they make ones with ducting adapters.
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#7 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:40 PM

Full time wood heat is out as my wife is incapable of maintaining it and I work out of town 4 nights week and even when I am home full time it's not out of the question for me to have to travel some.

I like the pellet stove idea. I have some experience with them now but I've never researched whole house ones
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#8 Coventry Plumber OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:40 PM

It's a question of the lesser of the evils.
- oil is good heat and gives the most BTU's per gallon ,when it's priced low it's great but how long does that last.
- propane is also expensive but a highly efficient system can make it worth it in the long run.
- Electric ? Depends on the rates

I also live where there is no natural gas so I also had to pick an evil.
I went oil but 10 years ago ,if it was now -Im not sure what I would pick

Not really a Answer
Tom
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#9 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:42 PM

1300 sq ft would be easy to heat with a Pellet stove.And even cheaper than Wood heat.Thing is with a pellet stove is that once the auger motor or control goes you will be without heat and it takes time to get the parts.

 

 

I wouldn't go with either one, but then again its what works the best in your part of the county. Your pretty much at the mercy of who ever provides your power using anything with an electric motor or element. I find that even though you might have wood on the site, its a lot of work getting it into stove size stuff, that's not wet or dirty. I prefer corn in my furnace over pellets, as I cant grow a pellet or control the quality of them.

Parts for any of the heating devices is about the same, it goes bad and you have to wait for parts, unless you buy a couple of the critical items and stock them.


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#10 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 09:43 PM

If your house is already ducted for central air, I would check into the geothermal. Next question is open or closed loop system. That depends on codes, availability and depth of water, and soil types. I have debated switching from Nat Gas to geo. My soil is sandy, but I have a steady water table at a shallow depth. Having a heavy soil with a high water table is best for heat transfer on a closed loop system. You also need a large area to be able to dig in the piping. Open loop systems just require wells. Multiple wells sometimes. I ran the numbers last spring for my place, closed loop, all done myself except drilling the required one new well, and came up with $16,000. I have 3,500 square feet of living space.
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#11 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 10:08 PM

I'm afraid I can't really relate to our friends down south. but up here, Natural gas/propane is the cheapest way to go.

 

I heat the home with gas, costs me around 90 bucks a month budgeted on a 12 month basis.

 

I heat the garage with electric, costs about 130 a month, depending on the weather. Winter time only.

 

both are around 800 square feet, and well insulated.

 

But our temps get pretty nasty, when it gets down to -30 or so, the house maintains a nice 23F, while I can keep stuff warm in the garage at about +15C..


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#12 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 10:12 PM

My brother bought a Whole house Pellet stove Ad-On for his Oil heater.He spent $4200 on it delivered.His has a 90lb hopper with 60lb extension.that's 5 30lb bags.He's burning mixed hardwood and corn pellets in it.His house is all single level and around 3000 sq feet.Rooms are all pretty big.4 bedroom 2 bath HUGE living room and big kitchen and dining room.

 

He works night shift down at Cleveland Brothers CAT service and repair center in Harrisburg Pa running the CNC machines all night.He makes good money but I don't get to talk to him much.Work long hours at night and come home and sleep for a bit till the wife gets the kids up and goes off to work.She's an on call RN.You can imagine that they don't have much time to do anything but they seem to really like the Pellet Stove Ad-On.


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#13 grnspot110 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 10:16 PM

Propane fired baseboard hot water, replaced the 50+ year old boiler 4-5 years ago.  

 

My shop has wood stove with a propane ceramic wall heater for a backup, only used it for the first time last winter after being there for 10 years!  I had to learn how to fire the stove with just one arm after shoulder surgery a year ago.


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#14 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 10:25 PM

Maybea propane furnace with a pellet add on...hmm...maybe?
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#15 hamman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 11:40 PM

Not sure where you are in OH., but if you have a oil furnace or LP gas you might look into a Heat pump system. Most of the good one will heat down to about 20* and then your furnace will take over. Just a suggestion. Geothermal is also a viable option. As was said you could have a looped system installed. If you are close to a water source, like a lake or sustainable pond you could use a pump and dump. All options are expensive, however geothermal i believe will start giving you a quicker payback. Might be close with the heat pump though. Depends on the efficiency of your current furnace. JM2CW.        Good luck.


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