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68 Super 12 Tri Rib Upgrade & my cheapo 'tire machine'

deestone 3 rib

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#1 MountainMichael OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 06:08 PM

I searched mainly the Sears forum on these topics and didn't find a lot.  I've read that some of this stuff sometimes is somewhat difficult so I thought I'd post what went easily for me today.  

 

I'm going to do this in two main beginning posts.  To take it in order and to keep the topics separated, in this first post I'll show some tips and my "tire machine" rig I used that made the reportedly sometimes difficult Deestone 3 rib tires go on easily.

The Bearing upgrade I have written up here: http://gardentractor...ing-conversion/

 

A special Thanks! going out to MH81 for the suggestion of the Deestone 3 rib tires!  I'm already liking them a lot and they look to me to be very well made 4 ply tires for a very low price.  

 

The first assumption is:  Because giant bench vises became pretty cheap, probably pretty much everyone has one.  If not, a normal bench vise will probably work fine, too.

 

The below is a 3/4" NC bolt 8" long and a oak scrap cut about 3/4" per side wider than the wheel.  Pine would work just as well; it's what I had on hand.

 

The bolt is clamped "mountain-man" :rolling: tight in the vise but no cheater bar used.    

 

Tire rig - just the bolt and board.jpg  

 

With an 8" bolt, I had to use some spacer washers.  The idea is to pull the wheel down tight against the wood so it won't be rotating or moving all over when trying to horse the tire onto the wheel. 

 

The below is just the wheel on the rig:

 

Bare wheel mounted to tire machine rig.jpg

 

Dish soap and water mix works, but I gotta say, this stuff the moto guys use sure is better.  Sometimes it's a 2 edged sword, though:  Things slip on easier... but also slip OFF easier until they've made it over center.  You can see the container is pretty old.  They're probably selling something newer and better now like 1.8??  Anyway, these 2 tires ring up 9 tires done with one container and still enough left for probably 4 more. 

 

Tire lube.jpg

 

In the winter, I can't just throw the tire out in the sun to heat it.  So I took it to 120*F in front of a radiant heater which worked fine.  I believe with troublesome tires heat is of the essence. 

 

Heating the tire.jpg

 

I find that the steel kinda' pointy motorcycle tire tools hole out too many tubes.  So I took these nice smooth forged aluminum ones out of my dual sport motorcycle kit and they worked great as always and no holes in the tubes.  I hope.  :D

 

If you don't have these, just pick the smoothest spoons in your tire kit and be careful. 

 

Moto Tire Tools.jpg

 

Some tubes like this Firestone one are a pest about turtling back into the wheel, so a quick washer stops that nonsense.  But be careful; with the neck secured like this, the tube could be ripped.

 

Washer to hold tube up in place.jpg  

 

So then Murphy got involved and I couldn't find any of my 4 air chucks to save my life.  So I used some more dual sport motorcycle kit and that aired things up fine.

 

Air chuck missing - Slime air pump.jpg

 

So it's admittedly pretty basic.  But having read that Deestone 3 rib tires can be a pill to install... and doing the above made it low difficulty (2 of 10? as tires go), I thought I'd post this.  Next post will be about the ball bearing conversion as pertains to a 1968 year model Sears Super 12 tractor.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Micke


Edited by MH81, January 25, 2015 - 06:53 PM.

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#2 tinbender7 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 06:16 PM

my friend has a  long 3/4 bolt and a hole in his work bench that sure makes changing small tires a lot easier


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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 06:31 PM

Good process, well explained.

many of these things come second nature to people who have done it before, but if you've never had to change a small tire... the devil is in the details. 

I would like to find a good video of how to use spoons the proper way and link it into this thread.  Anyone want to look around to find one or even do one themselves?


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#4 MountainMichael OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 06:42 PM

my friend has a  long 3/4 bolt and a hole in his work bench that sure makes changing small tires a lot easier

Thank you for the input.  If doing that, I would suggest placing it out near a corner or maybe a piece of wood extending out from the work bench.  In order to get the tires on, it helped a lot to be able to "over pull" the tire sidewalls far down over the sides of the vise. 


Edited by MountainMichael, January 25, 2015 - 06:49 PM.


#5 MountainMichael OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2015 - 06:44 PM

Good process, well explained.

many of these things come second nature to people who have done it before, but if you've never had to change a small tire... the devil is in the details. 

I would like to find a good video of how to use spoons the proper way and link it into this thread.  Anyone want to look around to find one or even do one themselves?

Thank you!  I appreciate it. 

 

There is a good video all over the web that was posted by dual sport rider "Neduro" in advrider.  However, it is slanted more towards motorcycles.  There are a lot of similarities but some parts of the challenge were different with the small diameter wheels of the garden tractors.  Also, there is a "holder" tool that helps a lot with motorcycles but that won't work with most garden tractors since they don't have spokes to hook onto.

 

Neduro's video does show excellent spoon technique so it is probably worthwhile.  It is highly recommended in many websites as important to study for all off road or dual sport motorcyclists.  Even big bike sites like the vid.  Highly detailed.

 

I'm not finding his video right off the top.  But here is a link to his "Tire Changing Class".  I think the video might be by someone later on in the below linked (extremely long) thread.  Neduro is or was in the Colorado Springs area and teaches or taught highly effective classes in person at Pueblo Motorsports Park and other places to help dual sport motorcycle riders improve their skills.  His teaching experience shows in his Tire Changing Class.  Gotta love the footwear, eh? 

 

Neduro's Tire Changing Class:

 

http://www.advrider....ead.php?t=50717

 

If anyone knows of a vid of the process with a garden tractor, I totally agree that would be better. 

 

Now that you mention it, two final basic but important tips with every tire installation - usually where first timers get into a fight:  In the pic of the wheel, you can see that the diameter of the wheel is far smaller in the center of the wheel.  In order to get any tire bead on (or off), the starting side of the bead has to be pushed DOWN and worked into that smallest diameter in the center of the wheel before the rest of the bead will even give a hint of going on.  If you then see that starting part of the bead pulling down into that smallest diameter area as you're working around the rest of the tire with spoons, victory is in sight.  

 

Another tip is to be very careful with spoon placement.  It's easy to lose sight of this when things start going around the bead the right way.  But even then, every spoon placement has to be careful to ensure that the spoon is not pinching the tube.  Pinching the tube usually rips it - meaning $ but it also means the aggravation of doing the whole process again.

 

Change enough tires and anyone can rip a tube sometimes so don't feel too bad about it.  You're in good company.  But being careful may mean the difference between 1 in 30 or 1 in 2 ripped tubes.    

 

m


Edited by MountainMichael, January 25, 2015 - 07:22 PM.

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