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cleaning the grain


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#1 Lauber1 ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 06:06 PM

today was corn cleaning day, after I repaired the flat springs to the shaker shoe on my old Clipper seed cleaner. This thing was build about 1930, and been here cleaning away for the last 7 yrs. we burn the corn in a furnace in the house.  It's  set  up in the shop so I don't get much tractor stuff done during the winter. clean 007.JPG clean 008.JPG clean 010.JPG clean 013.JPG clean 011.JPG


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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 06:27 PM

Hmmmmmmmm? A Corn laundry, huh?


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#3 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 06:42 PM

Jeff,

For those like me that don't know much about the process could you explain a little more detail in what it does and how it does it? Definitely takes up a lot of space with the wagon in there. How much corn can you process in a given amount of time? I am curious too on how much corn you go through with the furnace.


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#4 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 07:34 PM

I grew up with a couple "Clipper" cleaners, newer than yours, but the older one had an elevator to the bagger.  It burned up in the barn in 1962, was replaced with on with an auger to the bagger.  We used then to clean soybean & small grain seed for use.


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#5 Jack OFFLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 07:55 PM

Ok I am a dumb city boy. Why do you need to clean it before you burn it?
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#6 cootertom OFFLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 08:40 PM

You need it clean to make moonshine also. Never done it just saying.
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#7 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 08:44 PM

I did a little of that too today.  For those that are not knowledgeable on the corn stove or multifuel stove a little background is in order.  These stoves are designed to burn certain types of fuel for heat.  Some are designed to burn only corn, others wood pellets, and others are multifuel stoves.  My stove is a multifuel stove in that it will burn corn, wood pellets, sunflower seeds, etc.  I burn corn and wood pellets mixed about 60% corn and 40% hardwood pellets.  lauber1 I believe has a corn stove, in that he burns shelled corn only.  Regardless what one decides to burn, the fuel should be cleaned first.  lauber1 uses a fanning mill for large volume.  I have a small screen I run my corn and pellets over.  The results are the same.  Clean fuel.  There is always a lot of fines and chaff in the corn and wood pellets.  These fines can cause problems in the feed augur and they don't burn.  If to many of the fines gather and are put into the fire box at one time it will put the fire out. 

 

The reason we burn corn or other fuels is economy.  Living in Iowa corn is plentiful.  I bought a 90 bushel wagon load of corn for $3.30 a bushel and it was put in my wagon right across the road from the house.  Corn weighs 60lb per bushel at 14 % moisture, which is the moisture for storage and for burning qualities.  When I figure the cost of corn per pound and the cost of wood pellets per pound, the pail I use to fill the hopper in my stove holds 8.5 lbs. and cost me $.83.  The stove is in the basement of our 1250 sq. ft. home.  The basement stair door is open and on heat range 3 (out of 9) I burn 4 pails in a 24 hr period.  We burn a small amount of wood in the fireplace in the living room.  The LP gas furnace only runs in the early morning to hold a 60° min in the house.  There is a lot of heat in shelled corn and if it can be bought at the right price, it is much cheaper to burn than to buy LP gas.  But to work right, the fuel must be clean, just like your gas engine.  Buy clean fuel, keep it clean or make it clean.


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#8 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 08:45 PM

You need it clean to make moonshine also. Never done it just saying.

Yea right cootertom.  In Bama country?



#9 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 08:48 PM

Notice the white bag in the upper right corner of the second photo. That is to catch the fines that the fan is blowing out.  The fan puts out a large volume of air to clean the grain.  Thus the fanning mill term.


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#10 cootertom OFFLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 09:25 PM

Yep!

#11 Arti ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 09:27 PM

Screens that shake back and forth, air blown across the corn to clean it. Corn has a lot of red colored chaff in it that would burn but makes a mess every where.

 

I have 3 multi fuel stoves one I burn 80 per cent corn in that is my main heat source this year, and another parlor stove that is capable of multi fuel however burn mainly wood pellets in.  Cost to heat is approx one half of Propain for the year and keep the house warmer.

Have another one in  the workshop to keep the gt's warm.


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#12 Lauber1 ONLINE  

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Posted December 26, 2014 - 09:36 PM

well good thing Chieffan, stopped by and explained it to you. I had to go out and eat fish with the wife.  Its all pretty much as he said it is. I burn straight corn, the corn need to be free of foreign material, so it don't clog up the auger in the middle of the night and put the fire out. My furnace puts out 71,000 btu and will burn a max of 2 bu a day. I was heating 2100 sq ft with it, but I cut off a couple of bedroom since the kids are gone so I don't know what the feet are now. This furnace puts out heat 24/7, it doesn't cycle like a gas one and have to heat up the cool runs of pipes. You can run a small unit if your heat is steady. The output is around 100* and I adjust it up or down to get what ever comfy room temp I want. It has a fan that blows the heat out though out the house. Ok that's the burning part.  

 

If cleaning part is sort of like the inside of a combine. There is an inclined wooden box, called the shoe, that has a pair of screens in it. The shoe is mounted at the four corners by hinges and flat springs, and is driven by a crank under the bottom. It moves back and forth and kind of shakes. The top screen has the bigger holes, to get the large junk out, then the grain falls though it, into a smaller holed one that lets the fine stuff goes though. The grain then falls off the front and passes by an airblast of the fan, which removes the wings and dust. The dust and small leaf parts and dirt get blow out in to the bag instead of on the floor. The junk and fines drop into small chutes inside the machine and come out the sides into a bucket or barrel or what ever you have. The fines are mostly just cracked and ground up corn. I save them to fed the birds all winter.

 

In the pictures you can see the various parts to the system. The wagon holds the dirty grain, the auger on the rear takes it up to the hopper on top, where it sits above the shoe, as the shoe shakes the grain goes out an adjustable door on the bottom, out across the shoe and down into the machine. I raised this machine up about 2ft, as it would normally sit flat on the floor and you would have to shovel the grain up into a wagon or bin at the farm. As it exits the bottom half the blast air takes out the bees wings and trash, then it falls into a bucket. I been looking for one of the bagging elevators for several yrs, but there hard to find in descent shape.

 

This is my 7th yr of burning corn for heat. And it has saved me a ton of money, plus I get good exercise handling the buckets. I will burn about 300 bu this yr, which weights around 18,000 lbs.

 

2017.JPG

 

Also I have a pile of other screens for this machine and could reasonably clean just about any type of grain. This chart shows you how many different screen hole patterns you could have gotten new. Each hole on the chart represents what a full screen would have been in that size, there are a bunch of them.


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#13 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 29, 2014 - 02:22 PM

For the last couple weeks I have been playing around with my stove (American Harvest) to see where the best burn setting are to get the most heat out of the least amount of fuel..  I run on heat range 3, draft fan on 4 and room fan on high.  With those setting I get the most complete burn of the fuel and use the least amount of fuel.  If I go to heat range 4, I can raise the temperature in the basement by 1.5° but will use 1/2 again as much fuel.  I also found that if I clean the stove every other day I have better efficiency also.  I was cleaning every 3 days but the fly ash built up fairly good and the fuel use went up a little also.  Only takes about 15 minuets to clean the stove and restart it again once it shuts off.  I learned the hard way not to use the cheap paper filters on the shop vac to clean the stove.  That fine fly ash went right through the filter and out into the room like a cloud of smoke.  Every stove is a little different.  When I can't get the firewood locally any more we will probably go to a new multifuel stove in place of the fireplace.  Time will tell.


Edited by chieffan, December 29, 2014 - 02:23 PM.

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#14 Lauber1 ONLINE  

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Posted December 29, 2014 - 06:11 PM

that's the beauty of mine, just throw in the corn and go. It on a 10 sec timer, so if its at 4 thats 4 sec of corn then 6 sec of off time. it goes to 10. Unless its well below zero I don't have many problems. this thing only needs clean once a week and that takes about half an hour, maybe a little longer if a brush the flue pipes harder. we went though all the test and adjustment, ended up modifying some parts of it so I was happier with the output. Most people cant get by the wood stove mentality, that it don't have to put air that burns the room, just steady constant heat. 110* is about the hottest I need to get the output air.  for cleaning we use a shop vac with a drywall bag inside, nothing get out of it. Theres also another filter inside that covers the motor base, but its never dirty.


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#15 HANKG OFFLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2015 - 09:11 PM

You need it clean to make moonshine also. Never done it just saying.

Uh huh my thoughts precisely !
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