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Kwik Way Loader Forks


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#1 OLDIRONLINDY OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 09:35 PM

I have been working on a design for a set of forks for a kwik way loader. This was an option for these loaders but I have never seen a factory made set. From the pictures in the brochure they looked a little on the light side to me so I beefed my design up. I need to make 3 sets of these 1 set for my loader and two for friends. What do you guys think of the design? I did some FEA on the forks and they will handle 500# without any trouble. I also have an idea for a quick attach system to make it easier to change from the bucket to the forks. I will keep you guys posted on this project.

Attached Thumbnails

  • KW forks 2.png
  • KW Forks (2).png

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#2 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 10:21 PM

One thing to keep in mind is any weight added to the fork frame or the quick attach comes right off the lifting capacity. % wise, it adds up quick.

I really like your idea, I cringe when I see clamp on or flip over forks.
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#3 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 10:36 PM

The only thing I see. You have what looks look 1/4" pads behind each fork. I would run a 1/4 inch piece of flat bar across the whole thing. I would not weld it on, but use it as a replaceable wear bar. 

 

Other than that, it looks like a good solid piece of equipment.


Edited by Chopperhed, December 18, 2014 - 10:37 PM.

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#4 OLDIRONLINDY OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 10:45 PM

One thing to keep in mind is any weight added to the fork frame or the quick attach comes right off the lifting capacity. % wise, it adds up quick.

I really like your idea, I cringe when I see clamp on or flip over forks.

I agree right now the fork attachment weighs 56#. I think my quick attach idea will weigh less than 10#


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#5 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2014 - 08:43 AM

If you want to make more, give me a holler, as I have a KwikWay and need a set of forks badly.  I picked up a set of 36" forks locally for cheap, but they are 70# each, which already puts my load above that of an empty bucket, and reduces my capacity before I even build a carriage for them.  I've been tempted to see if someone could plasma cut them in half.

Is your 56# weight WITH the forks?  That seems awful lite...which is great if they can still do 500#.  I tested my capacity with landscape blocks of a known weight, and ran out of room to stack them when I hit 595#, and she was lifting just fine.  I have stuff on pallets that I would like to lift regularly, that I estimate to be around 550# (includes weight of pallet).  My oldschool rear forklift on my AC GT will do about 500#, but only after the fluid is warm, and I struggle lifting 400# right now with the cold weather.  I would also love to use forks in my woodlot, and away from home to move debris.

Quick attach would be amazing too...right now I flip between bucket and dozer blade, and if I had forks, that would be even more monkeying around with pins.  If you want to build a little more economy of scale into your project, please feel free to give me a shout.

Nice looking design!



#6 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2014 - 09:42 AM

You might consider bar stock.I had these forks on the back of a CUT for several years with no problems aside from one mishap.They are 5/8" x 3" x 30" mild steel and I am sure I have had 800 lbs on them.The corners are not bent on a brake but were welded.That would make you a little more slender for getting under things and you would not need the gussets.

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_2268.JPG
  • IMG_2269.JPG

Edited by Username, December 19, 2014 - 09:42 AM.


#7 OLDIRONLINDY OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2014 - 01:29 PM

You might consider bar stock.I had these forks on the back of a CUT for several years with no problems aside from one mishap.They are 5/8" x 3" x 30" mild steel and I am sure I have had 800 lbs on them.The corners are not bent on a brake but were welded.That would make you a little more slender for getting under things and you would not need the gussets.

I am trying to use all a36 Mild steel and the channel design is much stronger than a flat bar of mild steel would be. I would guess that most forks used in industrial applications are a much tougher steel such as 4140 or 4340. The problem with the tougher steel is it is much more expensive, harder to find, and harder to weld as it needs a pre heat. I may design the point so the taper is the other way this would make it easier to get under things.


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#8 OLDIRONLINDY OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2014 - 04:20 PM

Here are the FEA pictures

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  • FORK STRESS WITH GUSSET.PNG
  • FORK STRESS WITHOUT GUSSET.PNG


#9 OLDIRONLINDY OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2014 - 04:24 PM

I am trying to decide weather or not to install the gussets. It would have a 3 to 1 safety factor with them and a 1.5 to 1 without. I usually like to have at least a 2:1 and if it is something that is going to be used for overhead lifting like this more is better.






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