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How To Check (make sure they're torqued to specification) Head Studs On A Kohler K301?


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#1 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2014 - 10:31 PM

Just curious. I have thought about checking to make sure they are tight before I put the head back on. Thanks.

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Edited by Gabriel, December 17, 2014 - 10:34 PM.

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#2 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2014 - 10:56 PM

I have never really fretted about torquing the head studs beyond getting them good and tight with a good stud remover.  You'll have the nut pulling down on it tightening it up, anyway, and that's where the torque should be.

 

I always tell guys installing Kohler head bolts and studs to follow the book carefully.  They say to use new bolts (or studs, too) and then to oil them before installation.  That's my best recipe to prevent head gasket failure on a fresh engine.

 

Ben W.


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#3 diesel nut OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2014 - 11:43 PM

:iagree:  I do the same at work when I put heads back on the Kohlers. Clean the studs up good and make sure they're at least snug and put oil on the threads as I'm putting them back in.  I also wire brush the bolts and run a tap in the holes and a die over the threads of the studs.                Stewart


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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 07:05 AM

One thing to watch out for is the height of the threads on the stud or the depth for a head bolt. I always run a flat ended tap through the holes first. Then I screw in the bolt or stud and measure to make sure it's going in far enough, without resistance, so that the head will seat properly. This is probably more critical on a bolt but it could also happen that a stud would hang up in the hole. If a bolt hangs up in the block before the head/gasket is seated the torque reading will not be right and you could end up with a leaking gasket. Careful preparation is time well spent when doing this routine job.


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#5 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 10:28 PM

Thanks guys. So do you think I should replace the bolts and studs or just reuse the ones that I have? If I should replace the studs, how do I get them out?

Edited by Gabriel, December 18, 2014 - 10:32 PM.


#6 Bmerf ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 10:37 PM

Thanks guys. So do you think I should replace the bolts and studs or just reuse the ones that I have? If I should replace the studs, how do I get them out?

Take 2 of the nuts and thread them on the stud. "Jam" them tight together with 2 wrenches. You should now be able to turn them out using the bottom nut. In all honesty, If they are tight and have not been removed, I would not go though the effort of removing only to clean them up and reinstall. Just my $.02. 


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#7 Bmerf ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 10:46 PM

Gabriel, 

If you do decide to remove them, be very careful. They have been in that block for a long time. It would be a bad day to break one off. Another reason I lean to leaving well enough alone.


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#8 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2014 - 11:06 PM

Gabriel first I would bring the piston up with both valves closed. Stretch a piece of plastic over top of the cylinder area & pull it down so each stud pops through the plastic. This way your covering the piston & valve area. If you don't have a die cutter just wire brush the studs to clean them up. Like mentioned put a coat of oil & your good to go. Like Bmerf mentioned it would be a bad day if one broke.
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#9 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2014 - 06:06 AM

You want to " chase" the threads not re cut them! Too many times have I seen studs ruined from running a threadccutting die over them. Not good, especially on rolled threads, you just cut sharp edges into the once nicely radiused threads. This weakens them and creates stress risers. Not so bad at the block, but at the end of the studs.. Not good. Tapping out the holes in the block is fine to do, just buy a good quality tap for this , Hanson are junk, Emugee , Guhring, GTD,or OSG, these guys make good taps and dies.
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#10 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2015 - 09:55 PM

I was able to remove the studs! I wasn't going to, but I noticed that they appeared to have marks on the unthreaded part like if someone had used vise grips to tighten them. I decided to try and see if they would come out (I thought maybe someone else might have had them out or had added them to this engine so it would work for this tractor). I tightened two nuts together (on the stud) and tried to remove one. It came out just fine, so I went on two the next one and ended up being able to remove all of them. They weren't loose, but they didn't take an extreme amount of pressure to loosen them (I used a regular 9/16" wrench).


Edited by Gabriel, January 05, 2015 - 09:56 PM.

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