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For those of you with a wire feed welder


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#16 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 04:50 AM

I have the Hobart 140 and I love the machine. I use gas as I don't like all the clean up needed with flux core. Yes, wind does cause issues with the gas, but I find ways around that (shield to block it).


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#17 CRFarnsworth OFFLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 07:00 AM

If you are doing a lot of body work or working with light guage metal use the gas sheilded wire.

General purpose and heavy material use the flux-core.  

Pull the flux-core like you would a rod.

Push the hard wire.                                      Rick


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#18 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 07:21 AM

Pull the flux-core like you would a rod.

Push the hard wire.                                      Rick

 

That's what I'm doing wrong!  :wallbanging:  I had my ebb and my flow mixed up!     :rocker2:


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#19 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 09:16 AM

I did some reading on the inside cover of the welder and it seems as though I can't weld material as thick with the gas as I can without which makes sense if the gas is better with lighter sheet metal type material.  I'll have to take a picture of some of my better welds without the gas and maybe you guys can tell me if they are looking good or not.  I was pretty pleased with them.  I've always heard that the sheilding gas is what you use if you are welding in windy conditions but everyone here seems to be saying the opposite.  I love this welder.  I wish I had more to weld.  Thanks for all the good feedback.


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#20 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 09:39 AM

Mine is a Millermatic 185 about a 1997 model that I bought new. Now that machine is called the Millermatic 210 the 2nd biggest machine they have. (without going to a seperate "power source" and wire feeder like Industry often uses)

I have had 3 other MIG's before this one all 110V and burnt them all up. This one takes everything I throw at it and doesnt flinch. I do not use it as much as I used to, but it is weird/ as I can "not" need it for a few months and then one day I need to weld something and that starts an avalanche of welding jobs.  I have never "not" used gas in this machine.  Way back when I was in school, I used gasless and I did not like it. If I am gonna do something gasless I pull out the stick welder.

My past machines were an Astro, a Century and another no name all 110V.  I used to do alot of trailer work mostly single axle stuff, campers turned into utility trailers type stuff, not unlike what alot of us use to haul our GTs.. and back then when I had the 110s I basically went thru a 110V MIG every time I did another trailer job.

 

That Astro I had was painted and labelled for many companies, alot of companies sold this same exact machine. At work we have a "Marquette" version. All we use it for there is an occasional exhaust job. but after having had this Miller,  wow is that Marquette a rinky dink toy!!!

A welder is like an air compressor in a way, you need a bigger one than you "think" that you do.


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#21 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 10:09 AM

Mine is a Millermatic 185 about a 1997 model that I bought new. Now that machine is called the Millermatic 210 the 2nd biggest machine they have. (without going to a seperate "power source" and wire feeder like Industry often uses)

I have had 3 other MIG's before this one all 110V and burnt them all up. This one takes everything I throw at it and doesnt flinch. I do not use it as much as I used to, but it is weird/ as I can "not" need it for a few months and then one day I need to weld something and that starts an avalanche of welding jobs.  I have never "not" used gas in this machine.  Way back when I was in school, I used gasless and I did not like it. If I am gonna do something gasless I pull out the stick welder.

My past machines were an Astro, a Century and another no name all 110V.  I used to do alot of trailer work mostly single axle stuff, campers turned into utility trailers type stuff, not unlike what alot of us use to haul our GTs.. and back then when I had the 110s I basically went thru a 110V MIG every time I did another trailer job.

 

That Astro I had was painted and labelled for many companies, alot of companies sold this same exact machine. At work we have a "Marquette" version. All we use it for there is an occasional exhaust job. but after having had this Miller,  wow is that Marquette a rinky dink toy!!!

A welder is like an air compressor in a way, you need a bigger one than you "think" that you do.

 

 

The plain jane 110v welders have an exteremly duty cycle.  10 minutes an hour or something?  Wouldn't be tough to burn one up welding a lot in one day.



#22 sodisr OFFLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 01:24 PM

Thanks ALL for the exellant write-ups  I've been wanting a mig for some time now..and reading all the  threads about them is great..         

I would like option of the Duel voltage,,,,   I read the 220v gives a better bead also........  Any thoughts.??



#23 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 01:27 PM

220v versions do tend to have better duty cycle.  After my experiences I for one sure ain't going back to a 110V unit


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#24 tater195 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 01:33 PM

hobart has a 220v 185A machine that is about $50 higher than the 140. It might be a good upgrade from the 140 if you have that easily available. For the average weld job, the 140 will work fine. I run mine from a dedicated 110v 30a breaker. The 15a breakers are borderline if you have other things on that  curcuit


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#25 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 03:58 PM

I end up pulling equipment up to the shop and welding outside. This is another place where flux core shines. The wind isn't nearly the problem with flux core that it is with gas. I just can't seem to get excited about the expense of using the gas shield. 

For production work and inside welding for a paying customer then gas would be the way to go. 


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#26 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2014 - 09:06 PM

Someone touched on duty cycle. Duty cycle is sort of how long you can weld without stopping. A 110V machine will most likely be 25% or less. This would be welding 2 1/2 minutes out of 10 minutes. A good name brand 110 machine will do most anything you want on a GT. I've welded up to 3/8" with my Lincoln SP100 with preheating and multiple passes. I use CO2 mix and .023 wire at 25 to 30 CFM flow. Wind can blow the shielding gas away so set up wind breaks or move inside. Use a 20A or better circuit and stay away from extension cords or generators to power your welder. Generator power is too dirty and can ruin your welder.

A 220V machine in general will have a higher duty cycle and handle thicker materials. I wanted a 220V machine but bought a 110 because I could take it to anyone's house and weld. I made a lot of walking around money doing small jobs for people like that.

Finally, make the time to take a night course at the local community college to learn proper welding technique. It's well worth your time. I did it 15 years ago and it has paid off ever since. I ended up being qualified in three welds! It's too easy to cold weld with a MIG and have a weld that won't hold.
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#27 BNK OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2015 - 06:22 AM

Someone touched on duty cycle. Duty cycle is sort of how long you can weld without stopping. A 110V machine will most likely be 25% or less. This would be welding 2 1/2 minutes out of 10 minutes. A good name brand 110 machine will do most anything you want on a GT. I've welded up to 3/8" with my Lincoln SP100 with preheating and multiple passes. I use CO2 mix and .023 wire at 25 to 30 CFM flow. Wind can blow the shielding gas away so set up wind breaks or move inside. Use a 20A or better circuit and stay away from extension cords or generators to power your welder. Generator power is too dirty and can ruin your welder.

A 220V machine in general will have a higher duty cycle and handle thicker materials. I wanted a 220V machine but bought a 110 because I could take it to anyone's house and weld. I made a lot of walking around money doing small jobs for people like that.

Finally, make the time to take a night course at the local community college to learn proper welding technique. It's well worth your time. I did it 15 years ago and it has paid off ever since. I ended up being qualified in three welds! It's too easy to cold weld with a MIG and have a weld that won't hold.

Well said JBR! Before we all lost our jobs @ the Peterbilt factory in 2009 I was a certified welder. I was in a booth for all of the heavy axle suspension i.e. pusher/tag axles as well. Equipment was Miller .332 wire for main passes and continuous duty. At home I run a Lincoln SP200 w/gas/wire and stick and got a cheap HF flux core to do what you stated...mobility. In 2011 I hired in w/the state of Tennessee (TDOT) as a highway maint worker, then they found out I could weld. Someone in this thread mentioned rust? OMG! The dump trucks are eat up from the salt and brine "wash". In the shop they had 2 Firepower MIG units and I'm thinking "I'll burn these units up with the continuous duty" rebuilding the beds (floors, sides and gates). Taught one of my co workers and he learned fast. 2 days of prep work and one day of continuous wire burning and they held up really well...so have the beds...for now.  

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#28 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 23, 2015 - 01:22 PM

I AM A LITTLE LATE TO THE PARTY? I bought a handler 125 last summer and really like it
Where are you going to be welding ? Gas and wind do not mix. since i normally weld outside the garage i stick with flux core.
I live on top of a hill where there is rarely no breeze/
No doubt gas works better if you can weld where the wind will not blow away the gas shieldiing.




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