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How Would You Fix This?


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#31 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 08:58 AM

Didn't see this myself but read about it in the paper a few years back.

 

A guy was brazing a patch on a gas tank and it blew up and took two fingers off the guys hand.

He had filled it with water up to within an inch or so from the surface that he was working on.

The said that because the gas is much lighter than water, the fumes were all concentrated in that small open space on top of the water and it ignited as soon as he put the torch to it.

 

As always, common sense and a little thought needs to be applied before attempting any repair. 

 

The volume of the tank and the volume of vapor possibly left in the tank needs to be considered.  ....Trapping a pocket of combustible vapor is a bomb waiting to happen.  .....A small volume of combustible vapor will just go "woosh!" while a large volume will go "BOOM!"

 

As you stated earlier, exhaust gas from an engine is inert and will not combust, so it is an excellent way to purge a tank before and during repair.  ....The small tank in the original poster's picture does not need purging, if filled mostly with water.

 

I used a plasma cutter to cut up a very large fuel oil tank (oil was removed & tank swabbed) after running the exhaust from a V8 into the tank for 60 minutes.


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#32 mad_river OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 09:12 PM

After a lesson learned in tank repairs.. I got a pic of my lesson.. :) but I have always used dry ice in tanks big or small when heat or flame or welding is done. No more problems. But to answer the question my humble opinion is to clean and solder it back.
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#33 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted December 09, 2014 - 07:16 AM

I will make a second opinion on this,,that since the part was originally soldered re-soldering as others have stated is a good option. I just tend to weld everything. Usually larger projects such as this gas tank I started cutting the rust and holes out of on Sunday....At some point I decided to shelf that tank and build or buy a new one

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#34 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 03:13 PM

Finally got around to fixing the tank today.  Thank you for all the advice.  It all helped.

 

I started by marking a corner so I knew which way the small piece needed to go back on so that when the shut-off valve is screwed in tight, it would still be in the same position.  Once I removed the shut-off valve, I coated both pieces with flux and used the iron to clean the mating surfaces.  I found that even my largest iron could not generate enough heat to melt the solder between the piece and the tank all at once, so I went around the outside edge slowly a couple of times.  I needed to keep adding solder, which means it was wicking under the piece.  Once I had that done, it was time for some brake cleaner & a wire wheel.  It will spend the night with a coating of rust converter before getting leak tested & painted.  I did a crude pressure test, but gas seems to go places air can't.

 

Again, thank you all for your tips.

 

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#35 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 05:17 PM

Looks good!


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#36 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2014 - 08:26 AM

I see you used brake cleaner. Great stuff for cleaning however potentially lethal when heated as is any CHLORINATED SOLVENT. Yes welding or torching brake solvent could kill you dead or make you very sick with lifelong ailments!  Hope you are still with us? 


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#37 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2014 - 11:47 AM

I see you used brake cleaner. Great stuff for cleaning however potentially lethal when heated as is any CHLORINATED SOLVENT. Yes welding or torching brake solvent could kill you dead or make you very sick with lifelong ailments!  Hope you are still with us? 

Still here.  The brake cleaner was used after the heating process to clean up the flux.  


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#38 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2015 - 11:21 PM

Jazz is right. Brake cleaner can kill you if you weld over it. It kills you fast. I ran a heavy truck shop for over ten years and was responsible for safety. Brake cleaner is bad news. I don't even buy it. I don't want to make the mistake of using it. It cleans stuff fast but I would rather use something slow and safe as opposed to fast and deadly.

My unsolicited advice: throw all your brake cleaner away and never buy it again.
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#39 Racinbob OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2015 - 08:56 AM

Nice job fixing that. On the brake cleaner issue, just get non-clorinated brake cleaner. Clorinated can be dangerous and has even been banned in some areas. I started using non-clorinated in lieu of spray gun solvent years ago and now use it for many small cleaning jobs. Non-clorinated is still very flammable so you need to be careful but it doesn't have the dangers of a clorinated solvent.


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