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How Would You Fix This?


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#16 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 06:32 PM

The tank hasn't had fuel in it in nearly a decade. 



#17 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 06:40 PM

The tank hasn't had fuel in it in nearly a decade. 

 

You'll be safe then to solder it back on.....propane torch or large solder iron.


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#18 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 06:57 PM

I'd solder it myself, but that has to be done very carefully with a fuel tank!   

 

I agree, as most of those connections were soldered originally.

 

Use solid core or acid core solder.  .....If you use solid core, use a liquid or paste flux.

 

Do not use rosin core solder (that's for electronics.)

 

Thoroughly clean the mating surfaces to remove oxidation or crud.  .....You do not have to remove all the old solder, but you want shiny bright surfaces.

 

To prevent any possible problems from gas/fuel residue/vapors, put the gas cap on with a piece of plastic to create a seal.  ....Invert the tank and fill most of the way with water.  ....Leave about 3/4" air space above the water.  .....The water will also dissipate heat so other seams do not melt.

 

Used a small propane torch to solder the fitting back onto the tank.  


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#19 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 07:15 PM

My choice would be solder as well using an iron versus a torch. Show us pics when your done!  :thumbs:


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#20 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 07:26 PM

Over 50 years ago, when I was a youngster,  I worked after school in a small radiator repair shop.

It was owned by an old guy and he repaired gas tanks as well as radiators.

Since then I have cut and welded on gas tanks for myself and others and never had one blow up.

 

Here is how I was taught to prepare a gas tank :

 

1- Flush the tank out with water.

2- Remove any lines or fittings.

3- Place the tank inlet onto the end of an engines exhaust pipe so the exhaust blows thru the tank.   ( Use a car engine for 5 gallon or larger tanks.    A garden tractor engine works fine on the smaller tanks. )

4- Run the exhaust thru the tank until the tank is good and hot.  (  A half hour to an hour on bigger tanks. )

 

The carbon monoxide neutralizes the gas fumes in the tank so they will not burn.   

 

Disclaimer ...

I'm not telling anyone to do it this way, I'm only telling you how I do it !


Edited by jdcrawler, December 08, 2014 - 01:10 PM.

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#21 Traill95 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 07:31 PM

I would use silver solder.


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#22 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 07:51 PM

I've always purged with nitrogen before doing any work on a fuel tank. Find a tire shop that fills with Nitrogen, and get your spare filled. Hook up a line from the spare to the tank via hose.

 

Be damn careful, but I've used this process to braze a tank that was only hours empty of fuel.

 

if you need an adapter, hobby shops used to sell fitting for using a tire as an air source for an airbrush.


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#23 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 08:09 PM

It's fumes(vapors) that ignite. Since this tank has been dry for ten years it will not have any fumes to ignite. If it had fuel recently, then I would flush it and let it air dry in the sun for a while, fill it with water and then solder it. That's what I have done in the past. The hook it up to a car exhaust trick doesn't neutralize the vapors--it does two things--heat up the tank which will turn any residual liquid to vapors and the exhaust(carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide) displaces the vapors and oxygen just like purging the tank with inert gas displaces the vapors and oxygen. Remember it takes three things to start a fire: fuel, oxygen and an ignition source. Filling the tank with water eliminates two of those.
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#24 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 04:38 AM

Solder it with a heavy iron, ! Use an acid based flux, solid wire solder. You can have a propane torch handy to heat the iron hotter quicker if need be. Dont use a torch on it unless your really good ! Or you could end up with even more leaks as the risk of overheating is very high.
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#25 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 05:42 AM

Mark,

 

Clinton did not make their own tanks, it was bought off the shelf like all the other engine MFg, that should be the same tank the Kohler K-90 and K-91 used. Trying to remember the other engine Mfg but it is a bit early in the morn for that right now.

 

In all I agree with the soldering if that direction is to be taken and the tank considered sounds enough to dignify repairing. After a good shake with rocks and soap/water, Acetone will remove any residue and render the tank 100 % safe and ready to accept any repairs.

 

There is a very strong Marine grade epoxy JB Weld has on the market that is chemicaly resistant, including Ethanol in our gas, i have tested it with good success.

 

For lining the tank after repairs i have always used Red Kote but for tanks with multiple pin hole repairs that leaves much to be desired Lee Pedersen Tank Sealer can be used, it is a thick white creamy sealer that also is a one part sealer epoxy like Red Kote and several coats can be applied between very long drying time but patience, the best things in life are worth the wait.


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#26 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 06:47 AM

Didn't see this myself but read about it in the paper a few years back.

 

A guy was brazing a patch on a gas tank and it blew up and took two fingers off the guys hand.

He had filled it with water up to within an inch or so from the surface that he was working on.

The said that because the gas is much lighter than water, the fumes were all concentrated in that small open space on top of the water and it ignited as soon as he put the torch to it.


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#27 ffox OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 07:43 AM

They make a gas tank repair kit that I've had good luck with. It's like JB weld, you mix it together but it's made for gas tanks. It even works on wet areas. That might work. I got it at auto parts stores.


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#28 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 07:46 AM

They make a gas tank repair kit that I've had good luck with. It's like JB weld, you mix it together but it's made for gas tanks. It even works on wet areas. That might work. I got it at auto parts stores.

A lot of those are for plastic tanks. Don't work well on metal!

I think soldering with a hot iron is best solution.


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#29 ffox OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 07:54 AM

Advanced auto parts has one for metal tanks. A little pricy though, $12.99. I guess it would be nice if you had a leak and didn't want to drain it.


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#30 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2014 - 08:05 AM

The problem with using an epoxy product is that if it fails, and it has a high chance to let go sooner or later, then you're back to soldering and you must get every last bit of the epoxy from the metal or the solder won't bond.


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