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Removal Chassis Crossmembers?


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#1 MowerOCD OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2014 - 03:53 PM

Hey guys,

Well, I have my 108 torn down to the chassis now but I'm having difficulty getting the crossmembers out which hold the pedal and lift. They seem like they're being held in with grub screws but upon closer inspection it looks like just a rolled up piece of metal? I'm new to this hehe. Do I just tap it out with a hammer? Also, what do I put in its place to re-secure it after I'm done? I hope I'm being clear lol

 

Thanks



#2 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2014 - 04:11 PM

:welcometogttalk:

Not sure what you are working on, or refering to, but it could be a "roll-pin".

They are often times difficult to remove.

Start with lots of penetrating oil and lots of waiting.

Use a punch of the correct diameter (not too big) and drive it through.

41DX4ASinpL._SY355_.jpg

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You may need to back-up the back side with a hammer or anvil so you have something solid to hit against.

 

Roll Pin removal per eHow

  1. A Simple Drift Pin Punch
    • In the easiest of all extractions there will be two ends of the roll pin exposed. In these cases, a small diameter drift pin punch can be employed. The diameter of the drift punch must be smaller than the hole in which the roll pin is placed. Caution must be exercised so as not to flatten the end of the roll pins as it is extracted. By using a small, ball-peen hammer and striking with short strokes, most roll pins can be pushed from the placement using a drift pin punch.

    Drill and Tap
    • Small roll pins may be wedged tightly into place or there is no access from the backside of the hole. In such cases, the center of the roll pin may have to be drilled out with a carbide drill bit. Apply plenty of penetrating oil while you drill to act as a coolant. The center hole of the pin is then tapped so a bolt can be inserted. The bolt is then used to pull the pin from the hole.

      If the pin is too hard to tap, use a hardened, self-tapping screw. Drive the screw into place with a screwdriver. A slide hammer may have to be used to "knock" the bolt and pin assembly from the precision hole. You may have to modify the end of the slide hammer to accommodate the size of bolt or screw that was threaded into the center of the roll pin. Allow some time for the oil to soak through the sides of the roll pin and into the hole. The lubricant may help loosen the stuck roll pin before extraction with the slide hammer.

    •  
    Drill Out
    • Some roll pins may be so tight or rusted inside the hole that the only alternative is to completely remove the pin by drilling it out with a carbide bit. Caution must be exercised as the drill bit may attempt to wander off the center of the pin. This can cause a mis-centered or an oblong hole. Once the pin is removed, the hole can be re-drilled with a slightly larger bit. A larger roll pin must be inserted after the repairs are made.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/...-roll-pins.html

 

Found the attached link about roll-pins....maybe it will help.

http://www.engineers...om/roll_pin.htm

 

Well I thought there was a video of roll pin removal....sorry!


Edited by KC9KAS, December 06, 2014 - 04:21 PM.

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#3 MowerOCD OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2014 - 04:22 PM

Thanks very much! That's exactly what it is. :) 


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#4 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2014 - 04:25 PM

Good deal....Hope you can get it out without too much problem.

I hate these darn things!

I always have problems removing them, as I do not have a good set of punches.......Hey....SANTA!!



#5 diesel nut ONLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2014 - 04:29 PM

There held in with whats called a coiled spring pin. The ones on the brake shaft shouldn't be too hard to remove with a punch and hammer.  The ones on the lift can be real difficult to get out sometimes because they can get bent if it was always lifting something heavy or the arms got jammed by hitting something.  When you go to take them out I've found that it's easier if i use a tapered punch to get them moving because it gives you a larger area to hit with a hammer and it will transfer the force of the hit to a small area making the pin move easier, then i use a regular punch the size of the pin to drive it the rest of the way out.  When you go to put new ones in get the same as what was in there not a plain roll pin because it can break easier.  Mcmaster-Carr should have the right ones or if not Cub Cadet still has them but there not cheap.  I think the last time I bought some for a drive shaft I was fixing they were around $6 a piece.  The parts book list the sizes as 1/4x1 1/2 heavy coiled spring pin for the clutch pedal shaft and 5/16x1 1/2 coiled spring pin for the lift handle.  Heres a picture of the difference in a coiled spring pin and a plain roll pin.  The one on the left is the one you need.  Hope this helps.        Stewart

20141206_161707.jpg


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#6 MowerOCD OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2014 - 08:58 PM

Thanks guys I got them all out today with a set of punchces I picked up cheap! Next is sanding time :) 






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