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Single Stage Snowblowers, Snowcaster, Snowthrowers?


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#1 hammerdwn20 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 11:36 AM

What makes some better than others? What RPM is your auger spinning at? auger and housing design?  Ive got my Bolens single stage apart for some work and Im looking at the way it was made wondering what makes different manufacturers throw snow better or worse. I already added rubber to the impeller to tighten up the gap to the housing on another blower and that helped.

Im now looking at gearing since its chain driven off the gearbox. 26t drive 32t driven for each tooth added to the drive gear auger rpm increases approximately 35 rpm so i may buy a few different sprockets to see how the machine likes the different gearing.

 

Anyone have some opinions or experiences to share?


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#2 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 12:26 PM

I had to replace a chain gear on mine this summer.  I could not find the same gear/number of teeth.  I found one real close but one tooth more.  The one replaced will drive the s/blower a tad bit faster, not much but I have not had a chance to see if it will work or not.  So far, we have had barely a trace of snow to try it out.  Got my figers crossed, if it works, happy days.  If not, I will have to find a different set-up.  I hate using 3-point blowers, hurts my neck bad to turn/watch going in reverse.


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#3 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 03:01 PM

All depends on if they are well maintained and have a clean , smooth augur and chute.

Alot has to do with the way the operator is running it as well, it takes a bit of practice to get ground speed down in certain conditions.

 

I wouldn't play with gearing too much as I'm sure if that was a problem , the factory would have corrected it and already thought of that.



#4 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 04:05 PM

I changed the sprocket on mine on the impeller to a larger/ more teeth on the sprocket. Made a major change for the better. Throws good and does not loose engine power. I can keep a steady pace in the snow and not have to stop and let the engine catch back up. Noel

I also spray as much as I can on the blower with tremclad clear gloss paint and give it a few sprays through the winter when the blower is dry.

Edited by propane1, November 30, 2014 - 04:38 PM.


#5 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 05:33 PM

I don't think changing speed of the auger is the way to go.  Any increase in speed at that point is a decrease in power.  As Bolens 1000 said if a different speed was a better deal the factory would have made them that way.  Match your ground speed with your power and the amount & type of snow you have to move.  Also keep that chute polished and slick as you can get it.  A good shot of silicone never hurt a thing either.  Good luck.



#6 hammerdwn20 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 05:33 PM

propane1 you actually slowed yours down and got better performance?

My questions arent specific to any brand. Im just wondering why some single stages throw better than others.   All manufacturers arent running their blowers at the exact same speed are they? auger speed does have something to do with it as long as you have the power to spin it right

 

I actually used graphite paint in the one blower

  

 

 Ive got one stock blower that ill compare to the one im modifying. 


Edited by hammerdwn20, November 30, 2014 - 05:36 PM.

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#7 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2014 - 06:37 PM

Mine had a very small sprocket on when I got it. Yes it slowed down but works much better. And throws just as good as it did, but I don't have to slow down or stop to let the engine catch up again. This week we had 20cm of water soaked snow and it throwed it just great and did not plug up. And the stuff the plow put in at the end of the driveway was no problem. Noel

#8 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted December 01, 2014 - 05:40 PM

My guess is the pitch and angle of the flighting will have a lot to do with it. The engineers would have taken it to the breaking point, then backed up to a safe point for everyone.



#9 hammerdwn20 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 01, 2014 - 07:22 PM

Poked around last night looking at factory machines and ones modified by the owner looking for the best impeller tip speed. Seems like 3800 to 4500 ft per min is what you need to have a snow cannon. Punched a few numbers and it appears my blower is around 2915ft/min i can easily get the blower to that speed by changing sprocket sizes but I doubt I would have the power to make it useable. I'll try a few different sizes and see how the tractor and blower perform.
Might also add an egt to the exhaust because the pump on the kubota is turned up some
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#10 jerseyhawg / glenn OFFLINE  

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Posted December 01, 2014 - 09:17 PM

I have only had wheel horse tractors mated to wheel horse single stage snow throwers. Auger speed? I cant answer that, but I allways run with full throttle and I keep my ground speed slow. I let the snow thrower do its work and clear the snow. If you have your ground speed to fast you are feeding more snow into it and defeating the purpose. In other words you are overloading it. My chute and auger housing get sprayed down with everything from wd40 to cooking oil spray. The interior surfaces are kept clean and free of rust spots. I would imagine snow would start to collect and back up / pack down in those rusted areas. The snow thrower is allways greased and lubricated. Its amazing how well these old wheel horse machines are made and engineered and mated together. I would imagine the same with most other models to.

Glenn

#11 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted December 01, 2014 - 09:25 PM

Let us know what happens. My blowers are ford two stage. Queer set up on them , but they work. A lot of horse power loss before it gets to the impeller. Many turns in direction before power get to it. I have changed two blowers , both work good now. Engine horse power is a must for the blower to work. For a good working system, 5 horse power per foot is the rule of thumb,so I have read. Noel




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