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Question About Rust Removal Using Electrolysis Method


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#1 thom OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 12:54 AM

I have used the electrolysis method and was pleased with the results. I use common table salt in the water and put the salt in after the parts are in the water and connected to my battery charger.I pour the salt in , stirring as I pour, until the needle shows some charge. The parts come out with a black film on them that brushes off easily when dry.I have not derusted any parts made from pipe , tubing , or anything that I could not access the inside to brush the black coating off of. I would like to do some parts that I will not be able to get a brush inside, like some walk-behind handlebars or a bicycle frame. Anybody tried it ? I wonder what I should do to protect the unreachable areas? Thanks.


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#2 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 07:13 AM

The electrolysis is a line of sight process. So, unless you have an electrode inside

the pipe, tube, tank, or whatever, rust won't be removed. Maybe a bit on the ends. If you do

put an electrode in the tube, be careful that it can't contact the part.

Here's a picture of a setup I made to clean the rust out of one of crazy little B&S tanks.

 

P2140143.JPG

 

I'm not sure how you'd be able to safely remove the rust from inside

handlebars. Maybe trying to apply a product like Por 15 or something like

that.


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#3 cootertom ONLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 07:36 AM

I've been using Arm & Hammer washing detergent in my electrolysis tank. It does a great job but does salt work better?

 

Thanks, Tommy


Edited by cootertom, November 29, 2014 - 07:36 AM.

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#4 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 08:05 AM

I've never heard of using salt either.


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#5 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 08:15 AM

Some light reading.

 

http://users.eastlin...ectrolysis.html


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#6 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 08:17 AM

 

Thank goodness, I thought I was going to open up another thesis. I think Poindexter's still laughing about that one. 


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#7 thom OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 09:06 AM

I started using the process 20+ years ago , using salt after reading about it in the Gas Engine Magazine.Great magazine, back then, today -not so much. It has worked great for me. Salt is pretty cheap. I still have a pair of hub caps from a reel mower that were painted and hung on the garage wall back then. They still look like they did the day they were painted.I'm not so much concerned about derusting the inside of some parts, like handles , or handlebars as I am about how to remove the soft coating that remains when the parts are done. Maybe nothing will happen inside or maybe I should pour some paint inside to coat  the inner surfaces. I guess the smart thing to do would be to test it on a short piece of pipe or tubing and see what happens over a period of time.


Edited by thom, November 29, 2014 - 09:08 AM.

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#8 MFGray OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2014 - 11:49 AM

The black powder created by electrolysis tends to flash rust quite quickly.  I had that problem with the push rod of an MF blade. I did try to brush out the tube using a cannibalised toilet brush on a string after the electrolysis, but I could not get it all off so I used phosphoric acid to "fix" it and to prevent further rusting. The product tends to be rather viscous, so I diluted it a bit to make sure it covered all of the inside of the tube. Then when it was well dried, sprayed it with rattle can rustoleum/tremclad  - hoping that there was enough paint in there to cover everything.

 

To get electrolysis to work inside a tube you can put a rod inside hosepipe with holes cut in it, (tried that one and it worked ok)  or perhaps two or three  thick "O" rings along its length to keep it off the sides of the tube might work, but I have not tried that.


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