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Needle In A Haystack


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#1 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 05:22 PM

There once was a story about a needle and a haystack. Well, this is a story, similar but different.

 

There once was a man and a snow storm, a formidable storm that took the power away from many and left countless others stranded away from home. The man set out on a mission to rid his drive and lane of the storms nasty white effect. He blew and he blew and he blew almost until he could not blow anymore. With a ton of snow yet to move the man looked and to his utter dismay realized his trusty stead was lame and could blow no more.

 

Limping back to the homestead, the man found that a pin had worked itself lose on the pivot that not only allows the blower to rise and fall but holds the blower securely to his stead. As he limped back to the barn, the realization that it was the eve of Thanksgiving and the Calvary would not arrive in time to help move the mountain of snow yet to move made his heart sink.

 

Up early the next morning the man hatched a plan. Armed with his trusty metal detector he set off to find the proverbial "Needle in the haystack." It was not long after his quest began that his metal detector began sounding off, alerting him to the presence of metal. All in all, the man found not one, not two, not three but four of the missing parts. 

 

Search as he might, the man could not find what at first he believed to be the hardest to replace part. With the few part he had found clutched tightly in his hand he headed back to the homestead. The man set about searching his shop for scrap he might use to fabricate the part that still eluded him.

 

To make a long story short, the man was able to fabricate the missing part and finish the job he had set out to accomplish the day before.

 

                                                                            THE END

(Location of the bolt and one washer)

 

20141127_083930.jpg

 

(bolt and one washer)

 

20141127_083859.jpg

 

(location of the other two washers)

 

20141127_085002.jpg

 

(other two washers)

 

20141127_084953.jpg

 

(all four pieces that were found)

 

20141127_095519.jpg

 

(nut used to fabricate missing busing and the bushing from the other side of the blower, identical to the one I never found)

 

20141127_095744.jpg

 

(the original nut, the nut that I *ground down and the end of the bushing I was recreating)

 

20141127_101552.jpg

 

(another pic of the nut I ground down and the bushing I was working to fabricate)

 

20141127_101615.jpg

 

(a piece of steel laying around from something I took apart that I used for the back portion of the bushing)

 

20141127_101926.jpg

 

(drilling out the center of the scrap of steel to the proper width)

 

20141127_104137.jpg

 

(finished product)

 

20141127_110105.jpg

 

(newly fabricated bushing and bolt back in place)

 

20141127_112943.jpg

 

* The method I used for grinding down the nut was to sandwich the nut between two smaller nuts on a long lag bolt. I then inserted the lag bolt into my cordless drill. Running the drill in the opposite direction as my bench grinder I slowly ground the nut down to the size I needed.


Edited by Moosetales, November 28, 2014 - 07:41 PM.

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#2 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 05:48 PM

Great story . One trick that helped me over the years was to keep a mental tab of the tasks needed to complete the job and the time frame  it should be completed on . If any additional manpower as needed that was factored in . Most of my work has been in the field alone so ..  remembering what stage of the process the job is in   .. is crucial to reconstructing the time frame if something goes wrong .

 

 

 My boss in the office is Semper Fi  . We keep tabs on each other . Repair work can be very rewarding .

 

 Glad things are working out well .


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#3 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 05:50 PM

Wow once again Yankee ingenuity surfaces again. Great story & project as well. Glad it worked out for you.


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#4 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 05:56 PM

Great story. Thanks for sharing it and the ingenuity you used to fab a hard to find piece of hardware.  Great job!                                                Roger.


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#5 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 07:08 PM

As hard as it is to gulp down, I've come to realize I did this to myself (see below).

 

washers.jpg

 

As you may be able to tell, the washers in the diagram (#30) below should be the same diameter as the bushing and clearly mine were not.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 6.50.17 PM.png

 

When I re-installed the bushings today I did not add the outer washer. Now I've got to decide whether to disassemble both sides and ad the correct washer or live with it. The head of the bolt is nearly the same size at the end of the bushing so I'm thinking I'll be okay.


Edited by Moosetales, November 28, 2014 - 07:10 PM.

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#6 AfterShock95 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 07:31 PM

Great story and it ended well
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#7 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 07:41 PM

Did you use Locking nuts on those bolts?                                                                                                                    Roger


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#8 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 07:43 PM

Somebody once asked to count the number of loose bolts on an old tripod . We saw 2 bolts and 3 nuts laying on the ground . While the trained monkeys scampered around , I did my usual chicken scratching .

After 15 or so I decided to make the count as accurate as possible . In the final count it resembled the deductible in an insurance policy . The swing set is in fine shape and was in optical good form before .

But loose nuts are usually indicators of other problems . Purple Haze is fine but it can obscure the view .
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#9 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 07:43 PM

Did you use Locking nuts on those bolts?                                                                                                                    Roger

 

I used lock washers then and now. Are you thinking a lock nut might hold better in this situation? I noticed tonight in the diagram that it did not call for a lock washer but rather it looks like a lock nut, as you're possibly suggesting.


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#10 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 08:15 PM

I found Cousin Brucie the famous DJ in one of my scavenger hunts . The real mods here thought that my EV had gone over the cliff a couple of times . They can't tell what topic or what location I am at sometimes . Adds to the mystery .
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#11 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 08:17 PM

That's what I was thinking. If it gets a lot of rotation and or vibration it might need lock nuts.                                                                                        Roger.


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#12 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 08:38 PM

That's what I was thinking. If it gets a lot of rotation and or vibration it might need lock nuts.                                                                                        Roger.

 

Looks like I'll be heading out to the hardware store tomorrow and while I'm at it I'll add the outside washer that I left off. Thanks.


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#13 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 08:39 PM

:rolling:  :rolling:  :rolling:

Somebody once asked to count the number of loose bolts on an old tripod . We saw 2 bolts and 3 nuts laying on the ground . While the trained monkeys scampered around , I did my usual chicken scratching .

After 15 or so I decided to make the count as accurate as possible . In the final count it resembled the deductible in an insurance policy . The swing set is in fine shape and was in optical good form before .

But loose nuts are usually indicators of other problems . Purple Haze is fine but it can obscure the view .

              Being as I am one who has often been accused of having a screw loose, I'm not going to touch the loose nuts problem with a ten foot pole,


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#14 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 08:41 PM

I prefer Loctite over lock washers. Blue for when I might have to take it apart again. Red for when it has to stay forever. 

 

Engineers decided years ago that split lockwashers were worse than useless, and would actually help the nut come off. Star style lock washers work much better, but still not as good as loctite. For some situations, a castellated nut with a cotter pin, or safety wire is necessary.

 

Good job on finding the parts, and fabbing the missing one.


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#15 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2014 - 08:49 PM

I prefer Loctite over lock washers. Blue for when I might have to take it apart again. Red for when it has to stay forever. 

 

Engineers decided years ago that split lockwashers were worse than useless, and would actually help the nut come off. Star style lock washers work much better, but still not as good as loctite. For some situations, a castellated nut with a cotter pin, or safety wire is necessary.

 

Good job on finding the parts, and fabbing the missing one.

 

Hmmm. Now you've got me thinking about all the lock washers I have on all my tractors. I guess I need to do a bit of research. I've not used Loctite much but maybe I need to invest. Thanks for the feedback, I'd like to keep this part together so every bit of safety is worth it.


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