Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Looking For A Gp Flux Core Recommendation


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

New.Canadian.DB.Owner
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10178
  • 2,223 Thanks
  • 1,450 posts
  • Location: Trenton, Ontario, Canada

Posted November 21, 2014 - 07:32 PM

I am new to welding & have been using NR-211 flux core wire because that's what came with the welder.  I do mostly mild steel (1018) & some thin sheet metal work.  I am out & need to buy more.  What is a good general purpose flux core wire? 



#2 tater195 ONLINE  

tater195

    I dont deny your history..... dont deny mine

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62468
  • 1,306 Thanks
  • 933 posts

Posted November 21, 2014 - 07:35 PM

I use the forney or lincoln .035, which ever is in stock at the farm store. 10# spool is around $75


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#3 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,437 Thanks
  • 1,895 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted November 21, 2014 - 10:07 PM

menards by me had some .035 flux core on the clearance rack the last few times I'd been in there but I run gas with solid wire, "gasless" does me no good.... but I have  a"big" Miller MIG


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#4 Jazz ONLINE  

Jazz
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62028
  • 1,433 Thanks
  • 947 posts
  • Location: Thunder Bay Ontario

Posted November 21, 2014 - 11:04 PM

Buy  a quality wire from your local welding house i.e.: liquid air or whoever is in your area. If you are using flux core buy quality over quantity ,  there is a difference. JMHO


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#5 ol' stonebreaker ONLINE  

ol' stonebreaker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 12515
  • 1,304 Thanks
  • 973 posts
  • Location: idaho

Posted November 21, 2014 - 11:19 PM

  The OP probably doesn't have gas capability, but when I bought my MM 175 I tried the 1 lb roll of flux core that came w/ it and switched to solid wire w/ C25. That flux core is still on the shelf under the mig. If I need to weld something 1/4" I crank it all the way and burn it in good. Anything thicker the old Thunderbolt stick machine comes into play. I don't fret about burning holes w/ the mig. With manual pulse weld you can fill any hole.

                                     Mike


  • GTTinkerer and New.Canadian.DB.Owner have said thanks

#6 Oldford OFFLINE  

Oldford
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 50409
  • 802 Thanks
  • 572 posts
  • Location: n.e.

Posted November 22, 2014 - 02:18 AM

If you're doing sheet metal you may consider getting 2 spools, .024 for thin stuff, and .035 for thicker stuff.  Different size tips are pretty cheap too.  Forney does fine for me, which seems to be the basic hardware/auto parts store brand.  I prefer small spools for storage purposes as i don't weld that much.


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#7 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

New.Canadian.DB.Owner
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10178
  • 2,223 Thanks
  • 1,450 posts
  • Location: Trenton, Ontario, Canada

Posted November 22, 2014 - 09:31 AM

Thanks for all the input, but I think I may not have been as clear with my question as I could have been:  Is NR211 the best flux core wire for the job or is there a better rating, like E71T-11?



#8 Jazz ONLINE  

Jazz
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62028
  • 1,433 Thanks
  • 947 posts
  • Location: Thunder Bay Ontario

Posted November 22, 2014 - 09:55 AM

I am no expert but I think E71T-11 is a designation for a stick electrode..The 7 referring to 70,000 lbs tensile strength.  I rarely use flux core as most of my welding is body work where shielded welding is so much cleaner. I do enough of this type of welding to have gas on my welder.   You may source some wire that is softer(easier for grinding) 


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#9 coldone OFFLINE  

coldone

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 839
  • 1,631 Thanks
  • 1,668 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted November 22, 2014 - 05:30 PM

Cant make a suggestion on the numbers, but I started with Hobart flux core. One member here suggested switching to lincoln wire. It was a world of difference. I dont buy Hobart anymore.


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#10 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,437 Thanks
  • 1,895 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted November 23, 2014 - 09:37 AM

I am no expert but I think E71T-11 is a designation for a stick electrode..The 7 referring to 70,000 lbs tensile strength.  I rarely use flux core as most of my welding is body work where shielded welding is so much cleaner. I do enough of this type of welding to have gas on my welder.   You may source some wire that is softer(easier for grinding) 

no that isn't a stick designation. it is a wire designation. I do not remember the "code" about what all the numbers mean (I do know it more so for stick)  but I use E (or ER)-70S6 in my MIG which is solid core wire.  Yes, in MIG wire "code" I do know that the E is "electric arc" and the "70" is 70K tensile strength.  I remember them saying when I bought my 1st roll that if I tended to weld on "dirty" metal, that the "ER" was better than just "E" They do sell E-70S6 which is for "cleaner" metal... and that designation does not have anything to do with wire thickness. usually that is indicated after another dash after the "S6"   either -23, or -30, or (what I normally run), -35.

 

Even though Mig isn't "stick" welding it is still a type of "electric arc" welding...so yes the "E" at the beginning of the "wire code" still applies.


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you

#11 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,437 Thanks
  • 1,895 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted November 23, 2014 - 09:40 AM

and regarding "Hobart" wire... I have heard that before but Hobart and Miller = same company. (Lincoln is "the other guys")

I think it may have more to do with how "fresh" a spool you run, if it sits out alot and draws moisture/gets any rust on the wire that will mess with your welds. maybe the Hobart wire has sat in a warehouse longer?


  • New.Canadian.DB.Owner said thank you




Top