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Home Made Jerky?


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#1 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 12:29 PM

Okay, I know some of you make this stuff. I did a forum search and not many hits.

 

So, my goal is to make some turkey jerky for my mom's older dog. He is picky and can only eat natural type stuff and the affordable ones on market are from China with major health complaints so we don't buy them. I picked up a cheapo dehydrator from HF and I get turkey loins for really cheap from a coworkers wife who works at a turkey plant ( $15 for 10#'s of boneless loins, 1#  packs) so giving it a shot.

Anyway, the instructions state to make sure yo somehow cook the meat, boil, roast, etc before you dehydrate due to bacteria. I know it's for the dog, but I may try some other meats later on for human eating so just wondering.

 

Any tricks to doing it? I tried one small batch a few week ago, I must've cut pieces to thin and small, most of it was more like eatin' cracklins than jerky.....dog sure loved them!!!!

Would be great if I had a smoker to use real wood/charcoal etc, but using dehydrator for now until I can get the hang of it.


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#2 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 02:34 PM

I dehydrate raw liver for my dogs all the time with an "el cheapo purchase anywhere type" dehydrator with a heating coil in it. Cut the meat about 1/4" to 3/8" thick and process for about 24 hours. Liver is quite wet so the turkey probably won't take as long to dry. I have no spoilage problems and can keep the treats in a plastic bag or container on the kitchen counter indefinitely. The meat is not cooked, just dried and the dogs love it.


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#3 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 03:25 PM

Thanks.

I did my turkey the first time, put it in microwave before I dried it to kill any bacteria, I think that didn't help me. Then dried almost 8 hrs cause I left and forgot it. I may just try to cut thicker and dry less time next go around. Mom's dog is picky, he doesn't like any treats other than chicken or turkey flavored, even turns his nose up at the bacon strips and stuff like that....spoiled brat!!!


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#4 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 03:26 PM

The only person I know who did it, ground the meat and then extruded it through a special press that made an even ribbon that you dried.


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#5 tater195 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 05:34 PM

 I have never tried to make turkey jerky. I have done goose jerky, not quite the same type of meat though. Everything says not to leave poultry sit out very long and 12 hours in a "little more than room temperature" dehydrator goes against that rule. You can use a curing salt in the marinade that will help for this. Rule #2 is cook until the internal temp gets above 160f. That wont happen in the plastic dehydrators. The bad stuff (ecolli , botulism, salmonella, etc) needs moisture, so I am not sure if less than done jerky is safe for human consumption. If it is only for the dogs, it shouldnt be a problem. They can eat week old road kill and it doesnt bother them. 

If you want to do some "treats" for you, I would do it in the oven set at 170 with the door opened about an inch.


Edited by tater195, November 19, 2014 - 05:37 PM.

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#6 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2014 - 12:33 PM

 I have never tried to make turkey jerky. I have done goose jerky, not quite the same type of meat though. Everything says not to leave poultry sit out very long and 12 hours in a "little more than room temperature" dehydrator goes against that rule. You can use a curing salt in the marinade that will help for this. Rule #2 is cook until the internal temp gets above 160f. That wont happen in the plastic dehydrators. The bad stuff (ecolli , botulism, salmonella, etc) needs moisture, so I am not sure if less than done jerky is safe for human consumption. If it is only for the dogs, it shouldnt be a problem. They can eat week old road kill and it doesnt bother them. 

If you want to do some "treats" for you, I would do it in the oven set at 170 with the door opened about an inch.

 

That was kind of my thoughts too with the poultry, nothing others them dogs!!

I'm trying to get ahold of some deer meat to try some jerky with it, but no one will give any up :(

 thanks for thoughts

 

My sisters warn me about salmonella and the chickens all the time. Worried my chickens might have it. I tell them, well, I should've gotten sick already, I'm cleaning out dirty water bowl, picked eggs that get pooped on etc and been good so far   :thumbs:  

We got reptiles too and we make sure we clean up after handling them. :D


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#7 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2014 - 12:36 PM

Back in the day when we played "survivalist" we cut small strips off a fresh deer kill and strung them on willow branches and dried them over a smoky campfire. Delicious, but by the time you had them chewed into submission and swallowed, they tripled in size,lol. Because we lived on the prairie then, and found many flint projectile points, scrapers, knives etc. we tried using these in our butchering. Talk about getting hand cramps using these small, slippery tools! After making the jerky, Olde Deere #1 said we should make pemmican in the same way. One of our native prairie pastures had a large grinding bowl in a big rock, and we had found some different shaped pestles over the years, so we ground some jerky in the bowl 'till it was powdery, and added air dried Saskatoon berries. Then we melted deer fat in a hide bag, added the meat and fruit mixture and mushed it together in the bag. Learned several things in doing this, not the least of which is that there was considerable sand incorporated in the pemmican from using stone as a grinder. Dental problems must have been a fact of life for plains people. I'm guessing that pemmican was probably used in a melted or diluted state, like soups or stews, so the sand would sink and not be so hard on the teeth. At any rate, making the jerky the primitive way was time consuming, very enlightening, and lots of fun. There were not many days in our 46 years together that we didn't have fun and learn things, and making jerky this primitive way was fantastic.
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