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How Do You Heat Your Shop


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#46 Kmac1 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 10:08 PM

Tim that is my dilemma as my shop is 120x50 and there is no way I can ever heat the entire shop and really I don't need to. For now the double head propane heater is working for me. Willie
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#47 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2014 - 10:59 PM

Blue tarps for a ceiling and walls.
Mike

#48 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2014 - 05:45 AM

That is something that I had seen done already. Use a tarp or reinforced poly for a temporary wall to contain the heat to one end.



#49 grnspot110 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2014 - 07:40 AM

Heating with wood is not cheap IMO,,and it is almost like a full time job,,or more like a bad habit. I really should switch to natural gas as everything in my house including the clothes dryer are on gas but we like the ambiance of sitting in front of the fire,,,

That depends on your situation!  If you have to buy your wood or hunt a source & buy the equipment just for that purpose, yes it is expensive.

 

 But, in my case, I need to be thinning timber & cutting dead/dying trees & trees that are "out of place" anyway, so I just as well make use of them.



#50 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 07:03 AM

I built a thermo syphon to convert some sunshine into heat for the garage in addition to a wood stove.

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  • Thunder Bay-20141014-00534.jpg

Edited by Jazz, December 11, 2014 - 07:08 AM.

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#51 sodisr OFFLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 12:11 PM

I built a thermo syphon to convert some sunshine into heat for the garage in addition to a wood stove.

How's it working so far.???



#52 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 12:25 PM

It does push warm air into garage but only when the sun is shining directly on the panes. The temperature inside the ducting was about 160F with direct sun....I don't have a automatic control on the exhaust fan as yet...so I have to turn that on or off.  Currently using a furnace vent fan, powered from a 12v inverter and fed by a solar panel. 



#53 AfterShock95 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 12:54 PM

How about kerosene I heat my shop with it but my shop stays at 50 degrees in the winter and with the heater on it's about 68

#54 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 06:50 PM

I wish my problem was having to worry about how to heat my 6,000 square foot shop.......... LOL

#55 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 07:02 PM

Seriously one of the best things anyone can do is close the ceiling. You will freeze with open rafters. A few years ago we built a hunting cabin. The first winter we could not burn enough wood to keep it warm, then we drywalled the ceiling and it was like a different building. At 50x120 you will have a hard time keeping it warm. Anything that burns an open flame inside your shop will generate water vapor and carbon monoxide. If you have a car garage and have room, pull your hot car inside and let it sit. It's surprising how much heat it will radiate.

For the cold concrete floors, you're stuck. Add rubber or a plywood subfloor or wear thick soled boots. And don't sit or lay directly on the floor. The concrete pad is a giant heat sink and sucks any heat out of the building. Remember the heat travels from hot to cold. The most efficient is radiant tube heating. It heats you, not the air. If, and that's a big if, I ever get to build new again, I'm going with radiant floor heat in the concrete powered by a wood fired boiler. The boiler will provide heat and a virtually limitless supply of domestic hot water.

What do I use today? I have a 24x24 shop that's heated by a 30k BTU kerosene heater. I fire it up when I get home and it's nice and toasty after I finish supper. I burn maybe 1/2 gallon an evening, more on Saturdays.
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#56 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted December 11, 2014 - 07:17 PM

There is an air conditioner / heat pump with blower unit all mounted at the back wall of the garage. I have tried using it a couple of times but the heat is ineffective. However the a/c does somewhat of a decent job to at least take some of the humidity out when working on the tractors. Haven't used it much either though as most of the time I prefer to have the doors open for fresh air.

 

When it is cold out though and working in the garage we have a kerosene torpedo heater. I forget what the btu rating is on it though. It is enough to take the chill out and be comfortable.



#57 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted December 12, 2014 - 09:49 PM

Good a time as any to familiarize yourself with your insurance policy to see if your shop is covered with your current heat source. My wood stove and chimney have to be and are WETT certified.  The specs on insulated chimneys changed about 5 years ago in my area so I had to upgrade.  Without WETT certification the policy is null and void.  


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