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How Do You Heat Your Shop


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#1 Kmac1 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 05:20 PM

I was thinking of getting 2 overhead infrared shop heaters this winter, but once I checked around and saw the price tag of 650.00 each then the cost of plumbing it in and the propane tank I decided against it.  What I did was buy a 2 burn propane heater and 100 pound propane tank and mounted it to a dolly for easy relocation in my shop.  It really surprised me at how warm it keeps the work area and cost so far was $100 for the tank and $100 for the burner.  In below freezing temps I think I would need a second set up just like it and put one on either side of the work area a I would be fine.  Any thoughts or ??????.  Willie


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#2 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 05:28 PM

Right Now I'm using a 1500 watt electric heater. It keeps the shop about 15 C during the winter. There is an overhead gas heater but it needs to be fixed and the gas line is broken underground, and I can't get a permit to get it fixed. When it gets really cold and the indoor temp drops, I have a 75000 BTU propane construction heater that I fire up for 1/2 an hour or so. This past summer I put down some 5/8" thick rubber mats on the floor that really  help with cold feet.

 

The electric heat is expensive, but not as much as digging in a new gas line, and rebuilding / replacing the overhead heater.

 

In addition, the Dog lives in there and contributes some heat. Also, the beer fridge gives off some heat as does the air compressor when it runs.


Edited by Chopperhed, November 14, 2014 - 05:30 PM.

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#3 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 05:57 PM

I use a 4800/ 5000 watt electric shop heater. I used to have a 5000 watt construction heater but my insurance provider told me that the construction heater was for temporary use and I needed to have the proper one hard wired in or else they weren't going to insure my shop. It will and does keep the shop warm enough on its own.I keep it set at 10 c and turn it up to 15 c when I'am working in there. Which is almost everyday LOL .The cost to run it in the colder winter months I figure is approx $50 so not all that bad. BTW my heated shop is 24' x 12' so not that big but big enough to work in and be warm. 


Edited by massey driver, November 14, 2014 - 05:59 PM.

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#4 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 06:13 PM

I dont, but have a small bottle top burner for throwing a little warmth at my work when I have a project. My garage stays above freezing, but my shop is uninsulated and not a place to work when super cold.

I am interested in hearing folks thoughts though, as I would like to add lids to my shop and a small but effective heat source. 25x32

Edited by Talntedmrgreen, November 14, 2014 - 06:15 PM.

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#5 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 06:14 PM

My shop is small, 14' x 20', I use a jacketed wood stove (circulator).  Also have an LP ceramic wall heater for backup if needed.


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#6 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 06:17 PM

I have a ceiling hung Mr. Heater, 75k BTU in my 2 car garage/shop.  I already had propane in the house (primary heat source) so connecting to it was not to bad.  It keeps my shop at 40 degrees 24/7, even when it is way below zero.  Move thermostat to 70 degrees and I can work in the shop comfortably in bout 20 minutes.  It does eat the gas, but I like a nice warm shop.


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#7 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 06:23 PM

I've got one of those two burner heaters that mounts to the top of a propane bottle. Usually don't do much in the winter, though!


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#8 tater195 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 06:37 PM

Anyone tried the rocket mass heaters?

I have a small stick burner and I am thinking about adding a secondary burn chamber with a FD fan. Firewood is around $200 a cord here and I really dont have the place or the ambition to go cut wood. 

I have a pellet stove and electric furnace for a back up. The tightwad in me thinks I can still do it cheaper.

 

This isnt mine, just a pic of the rocket concept. I was thinking about adding a 55 gallon barrel vertical on the output of the stove for the "afterburner"

 

PocketRocket.JPG


Edited by tater195, November 14, 2014 - 06:41 PM.

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#9 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 06:38 PM

I have a ceiling hung Mr. Heater, 75k BTU in my 2 car garage/shop.  I already had propane in the house (primary heat source) so connecting to it was not to bad.  It keeps my shop at 40 degrees 24/7, even when it is way below zero.  Move thermostat to 70 degrees and I can work in the shop comfortably in bout 20 minutes.  It does eat the gas, but I like a nice warm shop.

 

What he said:

 (mine is nat gas, ceiling chimney though)

DSCN000319.jpg


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#10 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 07:13 PM

Apparently I'm fortunate to have natural gas to heat my home also stove,clothes dryer and hot water heater It also heats my shop it is the next cheapest fuel to wood. I do have a wood burning stove in my rec room.
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#11 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 07:14 PM

I would be very cautious installing a "barrel stove" in a garage or shed.

Your insurance may not cover you if something bad happens.

 

When I was the volunteer fire department Fire Chief I was asked by an insurance company to inspect the home-made wood burner in a fellows home.

Now mind you, this guy was a certified welder and built this thing out of an old insulated stainless steel milk tank.

It worked very well, and the guy wasn't planning on selling his home to the insurance company, BUT they said get rid of it or they would cancel his homeowners insurance because it was not UL approved!!


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#12 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 07:18 PM

I installed a used high efficency gas furnance in my pole barn. It is currently burning propane.

I only fire it up if I plan on spending more than an hour in the barn.

The barn is not overly insulated, but the heater does a fine job.

 

I got the furnance (free) from a HVAC guy that sold a guy a new one.


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#13 Arti OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 07:37 PM

Waste Oil in the work area, Pellet stove in the Office storage area.  Burn Vegetable oil when it is available I take what ever is offered however I really like Transmission fluid.

 

I mix pellets and shelled corn in the pellet stove it works very well.


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#14 tater195 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 07:45 PM

If the stove was built out of stainless and the flue was up to code, I cant see where the problem was. Sounds like the insurance company must have been doing the " paint by numbers" thing and nixed it because it didnt have a UL sticker. The production stuff probably isnt built any better than the barnyard stuff, they just payed an engineer alot of money to put his stamp on it.


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#15 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2014 - 08:31 PM

Waste oil furnace in our old shop, and it will move to the new shop whenever we complete it.  Neighbors & friends usually keep us well supplied with waste oil.  Last year with Dad's health care needs taking most of my time, I hardly used any oil for heat.  This year may be different, or at least I hope I get lots of repair work done.


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