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Jaques Mighty Mite Turning Into A Full Blown Restoration.


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#16 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2016 - 08:13 PM

Simply thread the adjusting ring all of the way off of the clutch. Be sure to loosen the set screw on the adjusting collar first. The set screw pushes against an arched metal strip and forces the strip against the threads, locking it in place without destroying the threads. Once the adjustment ring is removed, you simply slide the yoke assembly off of the clutch and the three roller assemblies will come with it.Now you can clean the roller assemblies to make sure that they roll easily. Further disassembly of the clutch requires removing a woodruff key in the clutch hub. This woodruff key is a tight fit and can be a bear to get out. With this woodruff key removed, you can then remove the metal clutch plates and the fiber toothed clutch disc.

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#17 RobR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2016 - 07:03 AM

Your directions were great.  I already had the adjustment ring off and part of the yoke assembly, but the ring wouldn't slide off.  I had to gently tap under and around the ring to persuade it to come off.  It finally did with the fingers and rollers.  There was corrosion which I can now address to get the mechanism to operate smoothly.  Thank you for the directions, complete with photos.  

 



#18 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2016 - 01:40 PM

You're welcome. The clutch should work fine once it's all cleaned up and adjusted.

#19 earthgrinder OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2016 - 08:42 PM

I had to adjust mine several times on the Jaques-Frazer tractor before I thought it was right.  The problem is that all the components are well worn.  I got it as tight as I could and still have it "snap" into place.  Sometimes it will un-clutch on its own.  Odd thing is it has always stay connected going up hills.  It is usually on the flat with no load when it will un-clutch.  To avoid damage to the threads by the set screw that locks the adjustment ring, I cut a small piece off of a 1/4-20 brass screw and put under the set screw, then used Loctite on the set screw.


Edited by earthgrinder, May 09, 2016 - 08:44 PM.

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#20 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2016 - 09:43 PM

I can see how these clutches can fail as the engagement parts wear. I did speak with the Twin Disc Clutch Co. who manufactured these clutches. Some of the parts were still available for them, but the clutch hub itself may not be. I suppose the worn areas on the hub could be welded up and machined back to spec if needed. Good idea with the brass screw and the loctite on the set screw, earthgrinder.

#21 RobR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 02:38 PM

I finished the Mighty Mite clutch rebuild this morning without having to get any new parts.  I see what you meant when you said the the woodruff key in the body of the clutch that retains the plates and toothed friction disc is a bear to remove.  Since those parts were all OK, I really didn't have to remove them, but I did make a gentle attempt to remove the woodruff key.  It didn't budge and I didn't want to get too aggressive and mess things up, so i left well enough alone.  I put the parts I did remove in my media tumbler for about 10 hours and they came out almost like new.  I reassembled everything and it's now in good working order.  Of course we'll see how it works when the tractor is reassembled some day.  While the clutch parts were "cooking" in the tumbler, I removed the rear wheels and hubs from the axle.  What a job.  Over two hours on the right side and over an hour on the left using a puller and hammer, alternating torquing with the puller and hammering the backside of the hub to get it to move slightly each time using PB Blaster and WD40.  

One more clutch question - what should I expect with the clutch pedal?  Does it snap into place without holding your foot to the pedal?  To release, do you press on the bottom part of the pedal?  I never drove this tractor since buying it last month since it didn't currently run (no spark).  I gave the ZZ to a good friend who is a very experienced engine builder to go through.  The P.O. (son-in-law and daughter of the original owner) said it ran before they put it in a shed about 15 years ago. I hope my friend has good news when he gets to the engine.


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#22 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 07:49 PM

Glad to hear everything worked out with the clutch. Yes, the clutch should snap into place and stay there without holding it. It may take a few attempts to get it just right. The Briggs ZZ engine is a simple engine, but it does have an internal oil pump. Later connecting rods for the ZZ came with a dipper/slinger to eliminate the need for the pump. The oil pump and slinger can both be used from what I've read. If the oil pump fails and there is no dipper on the rod, the piston will seize in the bore. Have the base removed from your engine and clean it out well. Sometimes sludge will build up in the base, preventing the pump from drawing oil through the pump pick up. A new gasket can be made out of gasket material for the base, and steer clear of RTV sealant or gasket maker.
The points may just be dirty and need a good cleaning to get your spark back. New points are available and so is the condenser if you need one. Original coils can be found if you need one, but they don't fail too often from my experience. All of the ignition components are located on the plate behind the flywheel and are pretty well protected from the elements. I bought a ZZ engine that sat since '52 and I was able to get great spark from the original ignition components. This was a very low hours engine, but looked rough from sitting for so long.

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#23 RobR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 05:56 PM

Thanks for the tips on the ZZ engine.  Hopefully, my spark will be restored with a good points cleaning as you suggest.

I can't believe how easily my steering wheel came off.  After removing the center cap, I could almost wiggle it off.  Just a few gentle taps with the hammer was all it took.  The front tires were just the opposite.  Sixty-nine years on the rims presented one whale of a challenge.  I ended up taking the fronts to a tire shop where they hinted that I don't came back with any more of that stuff.

Are you going with an original paint job or something a little different?  In thinking ahead, I'd like to keep it original, stripe and all, but am debating whether to paint the wheels yellow to match the stripe for a little contrast.  On the other hand, I tend to be a bit of a purist with a paint job as it rolled out of the factory.  I have a long way to go until that time comes, so I can give it a lot of thought.


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#24 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 07:09 PM

You're welcome. It's great that the steering wheel came off easily. They can be a real pain sometimes. I ended up cutting the front tires off of the rims with a Sawzall, and that was not a fun job at all. Every two piece rim that I've had to deal with gave me a hard time.
This would be a good time for you to service your Ross steering box. Disassembly is simple, and rebuild parts are available if needed. Hopefully the sector shaft and worm gear aren't worn too badly. You may be able to get by with just a good cleaning and a new sector shaft seal. These steering gear boxes should have gear oil in them, but some people put grease in them if they start to leak. Do not use grease or the gear box will wear out fast. I rebuilt one of these Ross steering boxes for my Gard'n Mast'r tractor last year. It was a fun project and came out well.
I will be restoring my Mighty Mite as close to original as possible, so I will go with the red wheels and the yellow hood striping. If you like the look of the yellow wheels, by all means, paint them yellow. A lot of people go with something other than the original colors on their projects.

#25 RobR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2016 - 08:08 AM

Good point regarding the Ross steering gear box.  I'm almost there and I'll disassemble and clean as you suggest.  From just pushing the tractor around, my steering seemed rather tight for a tractor that old.  No slop, so the box may just need a good cleaning and the sector shaft seal you mentioned.  The steering is black from oil leakage.  

I'm also wondering about the brakes.  One seemed more effective than the other, again, from just pushing it around before the tear down began.  Did you replace the brake lining?  It would also be nice to have a brake locking device, like on a Farmall Cub.  It just seems to me that putting the tractor in gear would not be adequate to keep it from rolling with just a small engine for a half ton tractor.  Does that make any sense?  

I noticed from one of your old posts, that your MM has fenders.  That is a real bonus.  I imagine that was a factory option??  

I'm heading out today for some new nuts and bolts to replace the rusted ones I removed and are not too nice for a quality restoration.  


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#26 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2016 - 12:46 PM

I don't know if you have disassembled one of these steering boxes apart before, but they are simple to work on. There are shims under the three bolt cover where the steering column shaft shaft enters the gear box. You may be able to remove 1 or 2 of them to take out any play. Also, on the cover plate held on by 4 bolts on the steering box, there is a screw and lock nut. You can adjust this to take play out of the sector shaft where the sector shaft pin rides in the worm gear. Do this on a bench if possible to make sure nothing is binding. Drag on components in the gear box will cause things to wear quickly.
I will be making new steel brake bands and I will reline them myself by riveting the linings in place. There are set screws in the brake hub on the pinion shaft that can be hard to get out sometimes. Remove the small cover off of the drop boxes and you can slide the pinion shafts out, and then the brake hub can be rolled out of the front opening in the rear end housing. This process will take some effort. I too will install a locking device for the brakes. I don't trust just leaving it in gear, plus you can't put the tractor in neutral on a slope to start it without a parking brake of sorts.
The fenders actually came off of an Economy tractor and someone put them on that Mighty Mite. I have never heard of Mighty Mites leaving the factory with fenders. It sounds like you are moving right along.

#27 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2016 - 12:56 PM

Here is the Ross column out of the Gard'n Mast'r Jr. tractor that I'm restoring. It's a Ross box like the Mighty Mite, but the cover plate is cast with steel washers. The Mighty Mite has a stamped cover with copper washers. Also, the Gard'n Mast'r has an upper column ball bearing under the steering wheel instead of a bushing like the Mighty Mite. The parts are interchangeable between the two columns, though. Use thread sealant on the bolts while reassembling the steering gear box.

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#28 RobR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2016 - 03:59 PM

Here is a photo of the Mighty Mite...

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#29 RobR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2016 - 04:08 PM

This text is supposed to be with the above photo...made a mistake in posting:

 

This is my first attempt to post a picture of my Mighty Mite, right off the trailer about a month ago.  The P.O. slapped on a coat of brown primer.  The tires had chains.  I guess the original owner replaced the factory ag tires with some well used, mismatched truck tires along the way.  They are now in tire heaven.



#30 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2016 - 05:43 PM

Great pic of your tractor, thanks for posting it! It looks complete from what I can see, and I see you have the plow with it. Mine had truck tires on it when I got it, too. The price of tires has gone through the roof, but I had to buy replacements for the restoration.




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