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Battery repair ???


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#1 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 07:11 PM

Has anyone tried this process? Does it really work? Thought I'd ask yall.

Thanks..

Lead Acid Battery Repair, Battery Rejuvenator Formula & Golf Cart Battery Fix

On sale for 5.00 on ebay..
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#2 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 07:29 PM

Brian i bought something like that once, But where in the devil i put it?????? Told you how to recharge everything some worked for me some didn't.
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#3 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 07:36 PM

Thanks Dale, You are supposed to use stuff from the grocery store to help clean the plates. I think I will buy 1 and try it. Only be out 5 bucks. No big loss, I guess.

#4 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 08:12 PM

Boiling water added Epson salt. Drain battery then refill and charge
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#5 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 09:53 PM

Definition of a antique tractor: storage place for a dead battery.
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#6 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 10:09 PM

Definition of a antique tractor: storage place for a dead battery.


:rofl2:

#7 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 11:14 PM

I have Epson Salt in every battery I own except one. It really does make them last longer and will fix some that have already died. I just pour the Epson in - in granular form and shook the batteries good. The battery that is currently in my daily driver pickup died four years ago. It wouldn't crank the engine over until I put the Epson in and it is still going today. This winter it started getting weak again but I got four free years out of it! As of now, if its below about 15 degrees my pickup won't start due to the weak battery but I have other vehicles I can drive if I need to go. I don't have to go anywhere most days - its not like I have a job - so I'm going to allow that battery to run its course. An old timer in our local tractor club told me about the Epson battery "additive" many years ago and I can tell you it does work. The only reason I haven't used it recently is the only battery I have that went bad has been under warranty and I have had five free batteries in the last three years thanks to wally world. They used to have the best batteries - now they pedal total junk.
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#8 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2011 - 11:56 PM

how much salt do you ad to each cell?

#9 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2011 - 05:31 AM

Definition of a antique tractor: storage place for a dead battery.

:bigrofl::bigrofl: I like that one.:bigrofl::bigrofl:

#10 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2011 - 11:58 AM

how much salt do you ad to each cell?


In a vehicle sized battery I use two heaping tablespoons per cell. In a lawn mower battery I use a hefty teaspoon per cell. In a motorcycle/ATV battery I use a leveled off teaspoon per cell. I was told to always remove the battery to allow for shaking because if you don't shake it - the granular salts will solidify in the bottom without dissolving.
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#11 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2011 - 12:26 PM

G-man, Thank you, I am going to try this myself on a couple batteries I have sitting around.

#12 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2011 - 04:25 PM

That epson salt is a neat idea. I'll hunt up a battery and give it a shot.

#13 WQDL753 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2011 - 04:24 AM

Very interesting, I've never heard that one but I'm gonna give it a try.
Curious on how it works...only thing I can think of is epsom is a sulphate, and batterys use sulphuric acid......where's our resident chemist. lol
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#14 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2011 - 03:12 PM

If you have ever left a vehicle sitting for any amount of time and then tried to start it, you quickly found it would not start. The Lead Acid Battery simply could not maintain a charge and even after charging it you may find it will not function up to its old standards. This is because the electrodes have sulfated. The electrodes turn in to lead sulfate, and the electrolyte loses its acidity becoming primarily water. Fortunately there is an affordable fix that will reverse the crystallization on the electrodes.

To accomplish this you will first need to purchase a chemical called, Magnesium Sulfate. This is a very common product that can be purchased at a local pharmacy or shopping center. It is often referred to as Epsom Salt and is inexpensive.

In order to restore your Lead Acid Battery you will need, eight heaping tablespoons of Epsom Salt and 2 cups(1 pint) of distilled water(rain water will do too.) Heat the water to approximately 160 degrees, not quit boiling. When the water has reached the proper temperature add the Epsom Salt to the water. You should stir this mixture until it is completely dissolved. While still hot and completely dissolved, add the mixture to the fill holes where the acid levels are normally maintained. Do not try to pour the Epsom Salt directly in to the battery as it will not dissolve properly. Typically, a battery that has been stored, for any amount of time, will have low enough fluid levels to allow you enough room for your solution without over flowing. If by chance there is not enough room in your battery you may need to drain some of the electrolyte from the battery to make room for the new solution. It is recommended that only add about 1 pint of solution to an average size battery. The amount can be adjusted accordingly if the battery is slightly bigger or smaller.


After the solution has been added to the battery it is recommended that you replace the maintenance covers tightly and shake the battery lightly. Shake only enough to mix the solution with the electrolyte. The battery can now be placed on a slow charge (trickle charge) until it has reached proper voltage levels. If you try to charge the battery to quickly it will appear charged, but in fact it won't be, it will have a false charge. It takes time to produce the proper chemical reaction to change the lead sulfate back to sulfuric acid.

Well, we'll see if this is worth 4bucks :laughingteeth:

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#15 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2011 - 05:23 PM

Many new batteries are maintenance free batteries, so there are no access covers. These batteries will take a bit more work to restore. Maintenance free batteries are sealed to prevent evaporation, but you should be able to see indentations in the top where the cells are. You can usually drill holes in the plastic to access the cells and plug with rubber caps after restoring. These caps can be purchased at your local automotive or hardware store.

This method will work most of the time, but once in awhile a battery just can't be restored. Sometimes there is damage elsewhere, even if not visible. The restoration process can be performed 3 to 5 times before the electrodes will just be to decayed.

Lead Acid Batteries designed for starting automotive engines and not designed for deep discharges. They contain a large number of thin plates designed for maximum surface area, and maximum current output, that can easily be damaged by deep discharges. Repeatedly allowing deep discharges will result in capacity loss and ultimately premature failure The electrodes will disintegrate due to mechanical stresses that arise from cycling.

Another misconception is that starting batteries should always be kept on a constant float charge, by means of a solar charger. Actually this practice will encourage corrosion in the electrodes. Which will also cause premature failure of the battery. Starting batteries should be stored on an open circuit and charged regularly(at least once every two weeks) to prevent sulfation.

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