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Air Dyer For Painting - Diy?


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#1 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 07:50 PM

Anyone build a system for drying air for painting or sand blasting?  My compressor shoots a water mist on a humid day.  Is there a cheap,  off-the-shelf, option that works well? 



#2 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 08:13 PM

Do you have a water separator in line? They do quite good, and don't

cost an arm and a leg, like a dryer. Princess auto carries them.


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#3 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 08:27 PM

Maybe you should hook the spray line to the air compressor instead of the water tank?!?!   :D

 

Just kidding!!   :smilewink:

 

So the air in your area is moist?  IE-  near a bog or swamp?

 

How often do you drain your air tank on your compressor?  start with that..  May be a lot of water in there..

 

How much pressure is your air system set at?  Another thing to consider is your air lines.  Wow long are they and is there a filter plumbed in-line?  Something like this could be installed and it will help..  Your air hose is full of junk/moisture so you can either replace it or you can do this:

 

So after you drain the tank, turn off the line and unscrew the fitting out of the end of your line and clamp/secure that end in a vise or C-clamp it somewhere heavy/secure.  If you don't want rust/dirt stains on wherever the line is pointing a board with a hunk of cardboard / rags can be placed to catch or deter the mess that will happen on the next step..  Put your earplugs in, go to the compressor and open the valve.  Move/shake your line around so any other dirt or water in it will be en-trained in the air stream and be expelled from the hose.  Close the valve when pressure drops and let the compressor pressurize and repeat.  Do this until you have nice clean air from the hose..  Install the new filter and spray away..  

 

BTW, if you are still using one of the old style sprayers, Why not try one of the new HVLP style?  Better results and less mess..  

 

Good Luck Pilgrim!!   :thumbs:

 

 


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#4 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 09:03 PM

I used one of the Princess auto dryers to paint a  car, It was the dessicant style.

 

It worked well, and could easily be made from scrap pieces if you wanted to.

 

The issue is the dessicant bags, they can be hard to get. However, sources tell me that a dessicant bag can be dried out in a standard household oven,  They are generally shipped with anything electronic, I have a box full that I've been collecting over the years.


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#5 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 09:19 PM

I used one of the Princess auto dryers to paint a  car, It was the dessicant style.

 

It worked well, and could easily be made from scrap pieces if you wanted to.

 

The issue is the dessicant bags, they can be hard to get. However, sources tell me that a dessicant bag can be dried out in a standard household oven,  They are generally shipped with anything electronic, I have a box full that I've been collecting over the years.

 

Are you talking about the tea bag sized bags with the electronics?

 

What's in them?


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#6 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 09:24 PM

Desiccant.  It draws moisture out of the air to keep the electronic items dry..


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#7 Kfs35 ONLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2014 - 09:26 PM

I used one of each of these and attached them to my spray gun. I was happy with how it worked out for about 10 bucks. It does make the sprayer a little more cumbersome, but it was still tolerable.

http://t.harborfreig...lter-68215.html

http://t.harborfreig...lter-68224.html
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#8 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted November 11, 2014 - 08:01 AM

Desiccant.  It draws moisture out of the air to keep the electronic items dry..

 

This stuff works.

http://www.canadasmo...CFQuoaQodHH0A1Q

 

We put it boats.

Maybe different stuff though, as it doesn't absorb the moisture. It attracts it, then deposits it.


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#9 ram41662 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 11, 2014 - 12:52 PM

You have two different set of needs there, due to air volume used for each operation. Conventional air spray uses a fairly low volume of air and is more of an intermittent action than sandblasting, so can be solved pretty inexpensively by installing an inline separator, like the one suggested from Harbor Freight. Sandblasting can be done be accomplished through several means and each use a different volume air, so the cost to dry the air goes up in direct relationship to efficiency of the blasting operation you are using, from simple syphon blaster to a full-size pressurized blast pot system. If you are just doing a little spot blasting with a small “bag-type” syphon blaster, the same inline separator mentioned before will work. From there, I would suggest you look into adding a coalescing tank and a small inline desiccant air dryer, then an after cooler, then a deliquescent tank, on to up to a refrigerated dryer, as volume demands dictate. As you can see, the cost will go up as the volume of air needing to be conditioned increases.

FYI, unless you live in a desert, nearly all air carries enough moisture when compressed to produce condensate that will spit out of the airline unless you trap and/or remove it. I would suggest you follow the instructions “Tinker Master” suggest. There is some good information there and a great place to start. As for using desiccant, most can be “dried-out” and reused if you warm it up for a period of time. I use a toaster oven to dry out the desiccant I use with my paint gun. That way I don't anger the wife by using the home oven. If you look around you can find “color-change” desiccant that is usually blue when dry and slowly turns pink as if traps moisture.

BTW, as you might be able to tell, I could write a small book on this problem. It’s part of what I do for work, so I have fair amount of experience.

Edited by ram41662, November 11, 2014 - 12:53 PM.

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#10 Kfs35 ONLINE  

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Posted November 11, 2014 - 01:05 PM

:ditto:

 

The inline dryer and filter I used worked great for painting.  Not so good for blasting in my cabinet due to the volume of air used. 


Edited by Kfs35, November 11, 2014 - 01:05 PM.

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#11 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2015 - 11:32 PM

Follow the lead of ram41662. Add a wet tank five to six feet or more away from your compressor. Put a drain valve in it. When the compressed air hits the wet tank, it will expand, cooling it and allow a good bit of the water vapor drop out. Keep this tank and your compressor tank drained daily and before you spray. Then add an inline filter before your spray gun and an oil/water separator when your airline comes into the shop but before your hardlines split off. Also use dedicated air lines for your spray gun if you have an oil injector for your tools.

Good luck.




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