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How Much Rear Weight Is Enough?


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#1 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 06:54 AM

Have a Bolens 1053 I plan to use with a blower and blade this winter.  It has good bar type tires and I have steel chains for it.  I know I will need more weight, other than my 200+ pounds.  I have a 6 - 44# International frame weights for a Farmall M tractor.  I plan to build a frame to hang a couple of these weights on the back frame of the tractor.  How many 44# weights is enough before going over the line with to many?   I am thinking that 2 would be the limit as that would be about 100 lbs additional with the bracket.  I have no idea what the Bolens wheel weights would weigh.

 

chieffan



#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 07:11 AM

You can always hang one on and see what happens. Then add a second if not enough. Filling the tires with fluid will garner more weight without stress on the axle.


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#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 07:51 AM

I have filled the back tires of my mower with windshield washer fluid.  Worked good.  I am told that RV antifreeze is heaver than the washer fluid so may give that a try.  On the mower I removed the wheel and put it on the tire changer and broke a bead loose in one place.  Poured the fluid in next to the rim till it would no go in any more.  Trick is to get the bead from the rim in on small place only and not the whole tire.



#4 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 08:07 AM

My pair of Bolens wheel weights are a combined 104 lbs. bare (52 lbs.each with no bolting hardware). I read somewhere you can stack up to 3 together per side. Check your tire weight capacity before proceeding.


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#5 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 09:34 AM

The "three on a side"  wheel weights only applies to the Large Frames with the 15" wheels.

 

WW fluid and RV antifreeze will both weigh roughly 8 lbs/gal.

 

You would be better served weight wise to fill the rears with Rim Guard which weighs roughly 11 lbs/gal.

 

23x10.50-12 tires will hold 6.8 gal/tire. That translates to 74.8 lbs/tire with Rim Guard and 54.4 lbs/tire with the water based fluids. That's a 40 lb. difference for two tires.


Edited by OldBuzzard, October 30, 2014 - 09:48 AM.

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#6 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 01:05 PM

A lot of people think you need 10,000 pounds of weight in the rear but that is not the case.

You will have no problems running a snow caster and plow with stock weights and chains.


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#7 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 01:42 PM

I get by with ~50lbs hanging off the back and ice chains, that's about minimum i'd say.  800lb GT 4' blade, would need more w/blower.  Don't get stuck but sometimes spin.   ~100 lbs would probably do it better either out back or on wheels


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#8 wilberj ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 03:28 PM

A lot of people think you need 10,000 pounds of weight in the rear but that is not the case.

You will have no problems running a snow caster and plow with stock weights and chains.

 

Ditto you dont need to add more then that.


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#9 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 05:27 PM

I have never heard of Rim Guard.  What is it and where can one find it?  I just priced RV Antifreeze at Wally World and it is $3.47 a gal.  That is about $47 for both rear tires.  How does Rim Guard compare price wise?  Lot of information received on this topic and I appreciate it all.  Lot of options to go with.  Thanks to all who contributed.



#10 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 07:41 PM

Introducing the Rim Guard Advantage

Since the invention of rubber agricultural tractor tires, farmers have been adding ballast to their tractors to maximize their pulling power and to optimize balance and stability. That ballast comes in two forms: iron weights and liquid-filled tires.

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  • Rim Guard® is the one and only Beet Juice™ tire ballast!

Today, Rim Guard® is available at over 950 farm equipment and tire dealers in 44 states and 6 Canadian provinces.

As you explore our Web site and learn more about Rim Guard®, we think you’ll agree that it is by far the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly ballast alternative available.

We suggest that you begin your exploration on our Products page.

Or read the news release concerning Rim Guard®.



#11 Bruce Dorsi ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 08:05 PM

A lot depends on the conditions you encounter in your environment. 

 

Smooth paved drive, or loose gravel ???

 

Flat ground, mild slope, or steep slope ???

 

Snow or ice ???

 

I try to avoid tire chains if possible.  .....I don't like them on my paved drive because they make the rear of the tractor bounce up & down, which actually hurts traction, in my case.  .....My drive is flat.

 

My previous residence had a steep paved drive.  .....There was no problem plowing downhill without chains, but the chains were needed to drive back up the slope.  ....In addition to wheel weights and chains, I had an empty V8 engine block mounted to a frame on the rear.

 

However, on a gravel drive, I think chains are a definite advantage.

 

I think wheel weights are most beneficial because they put the weight right where it will do the most good, with the least stress on the drivetrain. 



#12 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2014 - 10:26 PM

I have never heard of Rim Guard.  What is it and where can one find it?  I just priced RV Antifreeze at Wally World and it is $3.47 a gal.  That is about $47 for both rear tires.  How does Rim Guard compare price wise?  Lot of information received on this topic and I appreciate it all.  Lot of options to go with.  Thanks to all who contributed.

http://www.rimguard.biz/

 

Pricing seems to vary from dealer to dealer.  My local JD dealer fills my tires for $3.20/gal. which includes the installation.

 

They don't have a list of dealers, but prefer that you call them to get the location of a dealer near you.

 

I kind of like that idea as you can get as much info on the product as you want/need "straight from the horse's mouth".


Edited by OldBuzzard, October 30, 2014 - 10:28 PM.

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#13 Deerlope ONLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 05:39 AM

When the back tires are flat and the axles broke you got enough.LOL. Some times it is a trial and error effort that works out the best I find.


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#14 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 06:48 AM

Up in this area the price of Rim Guard has went through the roof.  About 6 years ago I had the rear tires on a full size Kubota  tractor loaded at a total cost of about $250.  Now to load a pair of 26X12-12 garden tractor tires the same place wants over $250 including a $50 per tire "service fee".


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#15 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2014 - 10:30 AM

I have a couple farm tire dealers and service center in this area.  Will do some checking and see what they have available and the charge.  If one was filling a large tractor tire I can see where the 30% increase in weight would make a big difference.  But with the small ties we are dealing with 30% don't amount to much.  In can offset that with one 40# weight.  I do know that calcium chloride is a thing of the past for the most part.  Appreciate that info on the Rim Guard as I never heard of it before.  I run my big tractor tires dry with wheel weights.






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