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Storing Diesel For Winter


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#1 Jehtro OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2014 - 06:20 PM

So looking for some tips on storing my walker with 3cycl kubota diesel for the winter.

Should I drain the anti freeze or leave it in? , put fuel conditioner in?

Pull battery, charge it up couple times in the winter?

Thoughts?

#2 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2014 - 07:01 PM

Rust.

 

Remove the air cleaner, few drops of engine oil down the intake manifold and crank a few times, put air cleaner back on.

 

Battery.

 

Dissconect and store in dry warm place on wood board.

 

Radiator.

 

If antifreeze is winter mix, 50/50, leave it.


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#3 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2014 - 07:12 PM

Fuel: if you have a plastic tank, run or drain the tank nearly empty. Add a small amount of biocide if your diesel is biofuel blended. If not blended, use a very small amount of a anti-gelling agent. For a steel tank, I recommend the same but leave the tank full.

On the use of additives, I'm not really enthused about it. But recent studies are showing that low sulfur diesel fuel does not have a stable molecular structure, and will pull moisture from the surrounding air over time. That is bio or straight fuel. The biocide is to prevent the growth of algae in your fuel, prevelent with soy-based biodiesel.

In no way am I bashing biodiesel, I think it is a superior warm weather fuel.
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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2014 - 08:22 PM

I do not store my diesel tractor in winter, I need it for snow removal. I do try to keep the tank full(it is steel) to prevent an air head that allows condensation. I always run Power Service in my fuel in winter. Never buy more than 5 gallons of fuel to keep in the can and keep Power Service in the can.
If your not running it in winter, I agree with what has been said.
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#5 Jehtro OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2014 - 09:04 PM

I think someone said to me once that colored diesel in Ontario has fuel stabilizer in it,

I discovered the truck gas station on the hwy can sell me colored diesel, which is great cause it's usually 15 cents cheaper without the road taxes on it

#6 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2014 - 05:57 AM

Colored diesel is just off road fuel so it doesn't have a road tax. You get caught on the highway with it in your tanks of registered rig and you will have wished you paid the tax!! Long term storage of any kind we would " fog" the cylinders and seal off exhaust and intake holes. Then either fill tanks full or drain complete (gas) . Gas products are very funny, some will handle long term storage well while others don't. ..
Never had an issue with diesel storage other than the fuel loosing all its c-tane. This was easily fixed with adding 911 to the tank.
If the coolant system has leaks even slight, drain it. If not wrap it up from wind chill . Driving cold winds affect anything with water in it or on it.
If stored indoors then it should be plenty protected.
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#7 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2014 - 08:12 AM

I worked in a Truck Stop for a few years. You will notice in cold weather states the pumps have a sticker that says the fuel is winter blended below a given temp.

Since the truck stop I worked in would go through 2-3 tankers of fuel per day, their fuel was pretty stable.

When the tanker goes to the pipeline depot, the fuel ix mixed according to the temperature at the time the tanker is fueled.

 

But we all know there can be as much as a 20 degree drop in temp over a day. So I always put enough power service in to be sure I will not get gelling.


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#8 baerpath OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2014 - 09:23 PM

I quit using Power Service, use Schaeffer's diesel treat 2000 instead.  Nothing against power service but I think Schaeffer's is better






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