Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

I Would Love To Have One Of These!wow


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Auburn David OFFLINE  

Auburn David
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 61865
  • 2,754 Thanks
  • 1,962 posts
  • Location: Alabama

Posted October 20, 2014 - 10:56 AM


  • MH81, Texas Deere and Horse, IamSherwood and 2 others have said thanks

#2 Jazz OFFLINE  

Jazz
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62028
  • 1,440 Thanks
  • 950 posts
  • Location: Thunder Bay Ontario

Posted October 20, 2014 - 12:25 PM

 
Preferences
 
Preferences

 My son is a journeyman boilermaker and they only use oxy/acetylene and I know in trade school they were cutting steel 12" thick so as slick as this "petrogen" may be there must be a reason it is not more prominent in the industry. Could be something as simple as the company having to promote itself more as acetylene is stinking expensive. Myself I use oxy/propane. I try to avoid using torches for various reasons...my favourite tool for cutting steel is band saw. I set a platform in the vise to make the saw more versatile..

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_0739.JPG
  • IMG_0745.JPG

Edited by Jazz, October 20, 2014 - 12:25 PM.

  • CRFarnsworth, boyscout862, Nato77 and 5 others have said thanks

#3 Nato77 ONLINE  

Nato77

    Old Iron Junky

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 9422
  • 1,646 Thanks
  • 1,333 posts
  • Location: Minnesota

Posted October 20, 2014 - 03:37 PM

For many years I've used oxy/propane. Personally I think this the cheaper way to go, for normal cutting use. I can see were a petrogen system would be better for certain instances. When I was heavy into scraping I would go through about 5-6 of the bigger bottles of oxygen to 1 20# bottle of propane. I was cutting through 4" material some days without a problem. The only down side is it takes a little longer to warm the metal to start your cut. For brazing or soldering a oxy/acetylene setup I think would be better.
  • propane1, Auburn David and holdenboy1960 have said thanks

#4 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

Bill 76
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 49625
  • 1,646 Thanks
  • 1,060 posts
  • Location: 5miles west of Milwaukee Wisconsin

Posted October 20, 2014 - 04:50 PM

Might be a money saver for someone that does a lot of scraping.I have an oxy/acetylene set up and use it for heating rusty stuck parts or for heating steel for bending.

I use plasma cutter for cutting,lots faster and allmost no destortion plus you can cut aluminum and stainless and the bonus is the only cost to run is what I pay for electric to run machine and the air compressure and new tips when needed. 


  • propane1, Auburn David and holdenboy1960 have said thanks

#5 MrMarty51 OFFLINE  

MrMarty51
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62893
  • 141 Thanks
  • 105 posts
  • Location: Miles City, Montana

Posted November 05, 2014 - 02:05 AM

For the thinner stuff up to about a 1/4", when cutting for precision, multiple angles etc. I use a die-grinder or a right angle grinder with a cutoff wheel.

When just cutting off steel, I have one of those chop saws that uses a carbide tipped blade, not a wood blade but a blade made for cutting steel. That is a slower rated of RPMs than a regular cutoff saw that uses a grinder blade.

The carbide tipped blade leaves the steel, even thick steel, just barely warm to the touch.

For thick steel, I use My oxy/acetelene torch. Use that for freeing rusted on bolts too, as mentioned by Bill 76.

That Petrogen system looks mighty impressive cutting through that much steel, multi layered at that too, even the one where there is a big gap between the two layered steel.

Might have to check into that.


  • Nato77, Auburn David and holdenboy1960 have said thanks

#6 gopher OFFLINE  

gopher

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2755
  • 569 Thanks
  • 631 posts

Posted November 05, 2014 - 07:34 PM

Smoke and mirrors the gas has nothing to do with cutting thick steel. The ox pressure is what doing the cutting. As far as under water its a internal mix torch. The tip looks like a 5 or 6. We usually run 2.5 tip and we use propane. A little tidbit when you get a cut going you don't even need the gas the oxygen alone will oxidize the steel the gas is just needed to get it to molten stage. 


  • Auburn David and holdenboy1960 have said thanks

#7 MrMarty51 OFFLINE  

MrMarty51
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62893
  • 141 Thanks
  • 105 posts
  • Location: Miles City, Montana

Posted November 06, 2014 - 04:16 PM

Smoke and mirrors the gas has nothing to do with cutting thick steel. The ox pressure is what doing the cutting. As far as under water its a internal mix torch. The tip looks like a 5 or 6. We usually run 2.5 tip and we use propane. A little tidbit when you get a cut going you don't even need the gas the oxygen alone will oxidize the steel the gas is just needed to get it to molten stage. 

It almost appears, in one of the cuts, that the flame had been turned to almost nothing, just oxidation going on.


  • holdenboy1960 said thank you




Top