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Anyone have an outside wood burner / furnace?


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#1 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2011 - 11:07 AM

I figured I would post on here asking if anyone else has an outside wood burner/furnace/boiler? We are going to be getting one here in the next couple weeks and I tried doing some research on them. I think a lot of it is just marketing hype, one saying stainless is the way to go and others saying carbon steel is the way to go. The thing I don't like is most seem to use 1/4" thick for the firebox which seems like it would be a little thin.

With the money they cost I would like to see it last at least 25 years otherwise even though you would save on your heating expense till you factor in the yearly amount of what the burner cost there isn't really that much in savings if it only lasts 10 years.

There are three in particular we are looking at so far. One is Central Boiler, one is Heatmor and the other is Earth Wood Furnace. The Central Boiler seems to be one of the nicest put together brands but they are also pricey(probably the most expensive of the three) and use a carbon steel firebox but I don't know what the thickness of it is.

The Heatmor uses 409 stainless and is 10 guage thick, the dealer is right up the road from us. They are the next highest in price.

The Earth Wood Furnace is the cheapest out of the three, they use carbon steel for the firebox and is supposedly 1/2" thick which to me would last the longest.

I know a lot of it is going to depend on upkeep, maintenance and cleaning. We are looking at heating at least 4,800 sq ft. Would be 3,600 for the house and 1,200 for the apartment. If we can also heat the garage that would be a plus but we are really not worried about it because for some reason the garage barely went below 45 degrees and there is already a heat pump in there if we need it.

#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2011 - 11:34 AM

My sister has a "Wood Dr", and she is very happy with it.She has had it for 3 years now,I'll see if I can get any details on it ,if she know anything about it.

Edited by mjodrey, February 18, 2011 - 12:09 PM.


#3 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2011 - 12:10 PM

I know nothing about them but I am interested in them and would like to have one in my house.

#4 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2011 - 08:10 PM

Don't have an outdoor wood furnace but I made an inside one for the garage/shop.
Basically it's a standard 200gal fuel oil tank with one end cut off, a piece of 1/4 steel plate welded to it that has a door cut into it, the tank is enclosed in a metal box with a chimney out the top, a 14" round duct fan feeds room air into the furnace (space between the tank and outer skin) and out the top through 3, 6" round take offs.
The fire box is lined on the bottom and back with fire brick, there is a 1/4" steel baffle inside, splits the chamber into 2 parts, 1/3 at the top and 2/3s at the bottom.
There are also water heating pipes that run front to back, no joints inside the fire box, that can be used to heat water if needed.
The furnace is very safe, the door has a good strong latch on it, I wanted something that I could lite up and forget about, lots of times I will stoke it up with wood, close the door and leave to go to town. Even if the hydro goes out and the fan stops working nothing bad going to happen.
My shop is a 4 bay garage with 3 overhead doors, walls are poured concrete, roof is open web steel truss, metal pan flat pea stone roof.
There is no insulation anywhere and I can raise the temperature inside 30deg C higher than what ever it is outside, it's not instant heat when you first light it but once you have a good bed of coals in there lots of steady heat.
My neighbor with the green houses has
1 40 gal,
1 500 gal,
2 1000 gal units all made the same way.

#5 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2011 - 10:35 AM

I don't know the specs, but I do know several people who have outdoor wood furnaces. Some of them are large homebuilts, which get a lot more than wood as fuel. Flax and straw bales make good fuel too, and it gets ag waste out of the way.

We also did a bit of research after my stepmother died and the cost of heating the big stone house became apparent. Then we figured out the guy who installed the in-floor heating system there was some sort of meth fiend. My nephew, with no previous experience or knowledge, sorted it out and cut the heating bill in half. We ended up not needing an outdoor furnace.

What we found with the outdoor furnaces when we started looking at them is that they work really well. Most are built out of 1/4" plate and they don't seem to have any problems. The only issue that seemed to come up is the lines to the house/shop not being buried deeply enough and getting damaged by truck/tractor traffic as a result.

#6 gordonr OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2011 - 02:57 AM

I built my own 30 in dia pipe 36 in long about 250 gallons water built late 01 i like how it works I would not have one without forced air combustion i burn mainly slabs from my sawmill last year finally insulated pipes with 4in styrofoam heat shop house and greenhouse

#7 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2011 - 09:02 AM

The idea of building one has crossed my mind but I think we are going to lean towards buying one. I think the Earth Wood Furnace might end up being the one we go with due to it having the 1/2" firebox and it is also several thousand cheaper. The Heatmor dealer is right up the road from us though. I haven't heard all that great of things with the fireboxes being stainless steel.

#8 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2011 - 09:26 AM

I had the central boiler dealer out and got a quote of around $12,000 installed for my 2500 sq ft house and enough extra for the shop.

I like the idea of building one as well.

#9 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2011 - 09:32 AM

I don't think it would be too difficult to build one, I think the biggest thing is to be able to have an automatic damper control and also integrate some sort of reburn for the gases to make it more efficient.

#10 Aussiedog OFFLINE  

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Posted May 07, 2011 - 04:57 PM

Check out the GARN Wood fired hydronic clean burn system. The intense fire completely and cleanly burns up the wood (no smoke) and then efficiently transfers the clean heat to the water storage/transfer system. Most systems do not burn hot enough and end up creating lots of smoke and inefficient heat. My wife's aunt bought an inefficient system that created lots of smoke and ate cords of wood like candy. They were contantly feeding it and wasting wood. They said it was big mistake and wished that they had spent more time researching more systems.

Garn Smokeless Wood Heating Systems Outdoor Hydronic Boiler Wood Gasification

#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted May 07, 2011 - 07:15 PM

I don't know anything about these systems, but a few freinds are running Newmac furnaces.
They swear by them. Not sure if they're available in US.

#12 tractor buddy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 16, 2011 - 07:17 PM

George my brother has one and loves it if you want more info let me know. he put it in by himself

.DSCN4047.jpg

they in the back ground. 2 wheelbarrow full a day. that's it.

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#13 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 16, 2011 - 07:28 PM

George my brother has one and loves it if you want more info let me know. he put it in by himself

.[ATTACH=CONFIG]14727[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]14728[/ATTACH]

they in the back ground. 2 wheelbarrow full a day. that's it.


What make and model is it?

#14 davepopoff OFFLINE  

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Posted June 12, 2011 - 12:32 AM

You should make sure that you have a lot of wood around to burn, these use a fair bit of wood when the weather is cold. They burn anything though, wet/dry/rotten, etc. You can also run the water lines around your hot water tank to heat up the water in there, saves money on electricity or gas costs for that. Also, some of these smoke like crazy when they are burning and not smoldering so make sure that it is not too close to any neighbors especially if they are outside a lot, they will complain about the smoke. A bit of a witch to light the first time in the season but once they are lit you only need to put wood in once a day, just make sure that they chimney is able to breath, plugs up with creosote but doesn't catch fire, doesn't get hot enough to catch fire.

#15 Bentwrench OFFLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2011 - 09:34 AM

cold 001.jpg I have a Hardy Stove and it is a well built unit. It is all stainless, 130 gal tank with a 60' loop of 3/4 copper inside the tank for feed to hot water. Open flue firebox with forced air combustion. These will set for along time with demand and will "fire-up" when the blower kicks on, downside is smoke. If the box has set very long it will smoke like an old steam locamotive ! Be sure and check your local laws many areas, state & local, are passing laws about outdoor stoves.




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