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Briggs Model 243431 Ignition Problem


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#1 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 03:52 PM

Seems my no spark/weak spark issue has returned. Earlier this summer I installed new points, plug, and condenser. Engine never started quickly, but ran flawlessly once it fired up. I presumed the slow starting was a carburetor issue. Today, I have no spark or a very weak spark. I've adjusted and filed the points. Also tried a different plug... no change. If I crank it over, with the plug removed I get a better spark, but it is intermittent. I've also removed the kill wire, just in case it was shorting out somewhere. I did get it to start, but it only ran for a minute or so before dying out...no sputtering, just quit running at 3/4 throttle like if someone turned off the key switch. Any ideas on what to try next?

#2 Auburn David OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 03:54 PM

condenser...?


Edited by Auburn, September 14, 2014 - 03:59 PM.

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#3 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 04:07 PM

Did you check the condenser to make sure its grounded or nothing is grounding out in the points box?

Did you check your key way to see if it could have sheared?


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#4 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 04:39 PM

condenser...?


Forgot to mention... changed that too.

#5 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 04:54 PM

How is the coil to flywheel gap?  If it is too big the energy will suffer.  I set them like this:  place a business card between the coil & the flywheel, loosen the coil hold downs and re tighten the screws.  

 

I've also heard tell that folks have gotten bad condensers right out of the box..  

 

Just a few thoughts


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#6 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 04:55 PM

Did you check the condenser to make sure its grounded or nothing is grounding out in the points box?
Did you check your key way to see if it could have sheared?


I'll try to check the possible grounding issues tomorrow.
Checking the key will be a job... (Backwards mounted engine in Simplicity Landlord). Wanted to do that, anyway, as I had a mouse nest in the engine when I started this project. Blew it out, real good, but eventually wanted to remove the engine sheet metal to be sure I got it cleaned out. Just wanted to wait and tackle that this winter when more time was available. I wonder if the mice could have chewed/corroded some wiring?
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#7 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 04:59 PM

How is the coil to flywheel gap? If it is too big the energy will suffer. I set them like this: place a business card between the coil & the flywheel, loosen the coil hold downs and re tighten the screws.

I've also heard tell that folks have gotten bad condensers right out of the box..

Just a few thoughts

I'll have to check these things too. I purchased ignition parts from Napa. Maybe their quality is not good??

Edited by Bill56, September 14, 2014 - 05:00 PM.


#8 classic ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 06:08 PM

It's worth pulling the engine so you can inspect the coil wires, clean the flywheel and coil and set the armature gap. After doing that, test the spark before installing the engine. Just turning the engine over by hand will give you a blue spark that will snap if everything is in order. Mice like to chew the shielding off of the wires and that could be your problem. Also, it would be a good time to clean the mouse nest debris out of the fins on the engine. Always use sandpaper to clean the flywheel and armature and clean off the dust and loose rust real good. Never clean a flywheel or armature with steel wool. The steel fibers will stick to the magnet and short out the coil.
My Landlord and Big Ten fire right up instantly with the ignitions In order. I did have to file the points more than I thought needed on the Big Ten, since a black spot on the points was keeping me from getting any spark at all.
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#9 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 06:48 PM

Since I've had little experience with this tractor... Any advice on what to do, not to do, shortcuts, hints, or whatever, on engine removal would be greatly appreciated.

Bill

#10 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2014 - 07:53 PM

 I had a mouse nest in the engine when I started this project. Blew it out, real good, but eventually wanted to remove the engine sheet metal to be sure I got it cleaned out. Just wanted to wait and tackle that this winter when more time was available. I wonder if the mice could have chewed/corroded some wiring?

 

Yes, mice are notorious for chewing insulation from wires, but another problem is caused by the mouse's urine.  ....The urine is very corrosive, and will cause a lot of rust or corrosion on the coil laminations and flywheel.

 

The coil laminations and flywheel magnets need to be clean to produce a good spark.

 

The mouse nest will also clog most of the cooling fins, and the reduced cooling ability can cause more problems.


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