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Concrete Wheel Weights


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#1 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2011 - 10:48 PM

Does anybody have, or made, any homemade concrete wheel weights?

Edited by DH1, February 11, 2011 - 11:03 PM.


#2 Alc OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2011 - 12:32 AM

When I bought my 2418 PK the fellow had made rear wheel weights for 16 1/2 x 7 truck brake drums filled with concrete , those thing were heavy ,took them off , I ended up using one as a base for a portable flood light !!

#3 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2011 - 09:07 AM

I made a set for a Allis B12 that I used to have[don't have pics or the tractor now] Anyway I made 2 froms one for each tire.I started with a piece of 3/4" plywood as my base.I cut it so it fit into the rim then drilled 4 holes where the mounting bolts were in the rims.I then used pieces of 3/4" pipes into those holes so they acted as tubes for the bolts to slide thru.I then cut out another piece of 3/4" plywood for the upper ring kinda looked like a big washer.The reason for that is that it created the step up for the form where it cleared the rim.Then once I had that cut out I measured the depth of the rim and cut out a piece of tin which I screwed onto the outside of the base piece ,and onto the inside of the upper ring . The next step was to cut another piece of 3/4" plywood where the inside Dia. was the same size as the outside dia. of the step up that I wanted.It looked like another washer but bigger then the second one.This one is just used to hold the top piece of tin.The next was to decide how wide to make the step out part of the form.Once I decided I then cut out another piece of tin and screwed it to the outside of the second ring and to the inside of the third ring.This was the form.I had pre cut the pipes so that they were the length of the depth of the weights.If I remeber right I had added in a bit of rebar into the form's as well.Before I mixed and poured the concrete I also bolted the pieces of pipes in place using ready rod cut to proper lengths.My weights ended up beinf 75# each.Guess on your design etc: it will vary the weight of the weights.Larry
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#4 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2011 - 10:10 AM

I have also made concreat weights before, up to 5o lbs. but I reely think that wheel weights are a little over rated. I know it seems logical, more weight, more down pressure, thus more traction but from what I've experienced, it just hasn't proven itself to me.
If the ground you are plowing is muddy, as soon as the ag wheel threads get filled, they are like racing slicks and all the weight in the world dosen't help. Now , For Gardening as well as Snow Plowing I keep Chains on my tractor year round, no wheel weights at all and I never have any problem with traction.
Perhaps to a degree it depends on the tractor and type of transmission you have, I don't know. Do You Guys reely think that wheel weights help you? have you seen a noticable difference, with & without?

#5 Alc OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2011 - 07:36 PM

When I bought my 2418 PK the fellow had made rear wheel weights for 16 1/2 x 7 truck brake drums filled with concrete , those thing were heavy ,took them off ,

I think maybe the weights could give you too much traction because when I bought the 2418 it had a broken frame which caused the enclosed drive shaft to break the transmission. He must have pulled pretty hard on the 3pt to do that !!!!!

#6 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2011 - 09:41 PM

Night and day plowing snow. My neighbor has a matching MF-12 with loaded tires, chains, and weights. I have another 225 lbs on the back. While plowing his driveway, it was clear who had more traction to the ground. Mine would plow circles around him AND I have a larger blade which requires even more traction to push a full snow load.

If you make cement weights, try to find a 5 gallon bucket of lead wheel weights and put as many into your form as you can. It's much heavier and will not only help weight, it will help the mass stay in once piece.

#7 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2011 - 09:15 AM

If you use lead then you'll have to make your forms out of steel.I made a set that way a few yrs ago for the MF 10 that I used to have.I don't have the tractor anymore but still kept the weights .There 90# each.I made them pretty much the same as I did with the concrete forms only used steel.I also used a coffee can in the center as to create a hole in the center of the weight.The reason for this was that I put the weight on the inside of the rim and it would fit over the axle.This way I could leave the weight on the rim and still have access to the wheel nuts without having to remove the weights when ever I wanted to take the tire/rim off the tractor. The weights are show mounted on my MF 1655 now but they have to be on the outside of the rim as they won't slide over top of the axle on the MF 1655 due to it having a larger dia.Using lead is the way to go as you do get way more weight for the mass, just like firefyterEmt said . Larry

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#8 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2011 - 08:43 PM

Solid lead is even better, but what I was taking about is just adding a bunch to the cement. I think a great way to go is to add the lead weights inside those plastic, cement filled shells. They will look the same, but weight a fair bit more.

I like the idea of the weights on the inside too. This may be the answer for my wheel weights too. I run the dedicated turfs with chains in the winter. If I run them inboard, the tractor will look clean and they do not have to be removed. What I really need is a junk 12" wheel center that I could build a form out of. Just carbon-load the form, and pour a perfect fitted weight to the rim.

Now that I think of it, I wonder how close a freon tank OD is compared to the rims. That might make a nice form to pour the weights into as well.

Edited by FirefyterEmt, February 14, 2011 - 09:06 PM.





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