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#31 petrj6 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2014 - 04:21 PM

    I LIKE IT!!!!  That is a neat little machine.  I have never seen on like it before,  you have done it proud by fixing it up like that.  If you ad another boom to it with longer forks it will mess with the center of gravity, you will need to be careful it does not tip over foraward.  We had a kid do that at work a few years ago, the truck tipped over foreward then the load slid of the forks and BANG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  down came the truck to all fours again.  the kid got pretty badly beat up from that ride.

    I guess what I am saying is be careful changing the machine like that, It was designed to be used the way it is and may be dangerous with longer forks.  Not lecturing just saying :thumbs:


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#32 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2014 - 10:08 PM

I guess I see  this a little different than most people.

To me, this forklift was designed as a material handler and not a stacker as most forklifts, so I see the forks designed for a particular job.

It is built with short forks that don't lift very high and a tall support back on the boom so it can go in and grab a create and head off for the loading dock at 7 MPH.

 

If you classified this by the size of the machine and the lift capacity, it would be in the same class as a garden tractor with a fork lift attached such as this.

This Cub advertisement says it is rated for 500 pounds and will lift 6 foot high.

 

cubcadet_img3-21.jpg

 

The 3-point forklift unit that I have looks to be about the same size as the one on this Cub.

In comparison,  my forklift weighs 1,022 pounds with  another 500 to 600 pounds in the extra counter weights over the rear wheels.

Most of this weight is on the back half of the machine.

My forklift has 4.80x8 tires that hold 80 pounds air pressure and the front axle and frame is made out of much heavier materiel than what a garden tractor is.

 

I believe the garden tractor has a distance of about 4 foot from the center of the front axle to the center of the rear axle and the counter weight is hung out behind that.

The wheel base on my forklift is only 3 foot with the counter weight over the rear wheels so I may have to add more counter weight to offset the extra length of the longer forks but that wouldn't be hard to do.

 

So if a garden tractor can safely handle 500 to 600 pounds with a full lift boom with longer forks than I see no reason why my forklift cant handle a regular boom also. 

One big advantage that my forklift has over a garden tractor with a forklift attachment is that the boom on my forklift can tilt back so far.

As the forks are raised, the weight of the load is actually moving back over the front wheels instead of staying completely out in front of the wheels.

 

Of course my forklift is no different than any other forklift in that you have to understand what the weight limit is for any particular machine and you have to stay within that limit !


Edited by jdcrawler, July 25, 2014 - 10:30 PM.

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#33 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2014 - 06:34 AM

Well said Ray. Your unit is designed to handle much more weight than a GT, but you will be giving some of that capacity up to yield more height (changing load center).

I think the weight on the rear of yours is more than sufficient to safely lift 500# to 4, 5 or 6 feet. That is a LOT of counterweight and the majority hangs aft of the rear axle.

The machine was designed to do its job without the weights...they were optional and probably added for safety and to enable higher speed transport and maneuvering of goods.

I know you are going to make me miss her! Cant wait to see it with that new mast.
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#34 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2014 - 09:19 AM

Actually used the forklift for the first time today to lift the Case tractor to make it easier to remove the mower deck.

300_zps378a95e7.jpg

 

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Edited by jdcrawler, July 26, 2014 - 09:20 AM.

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#35 superspeedex OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2014 - 07:25 PM

Thats a cool little machine would look great picking up my mini dozer with your mini forklift haha


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#36 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted August 01, 2014 - 11:43 AM

Three of the tires on this forklift are the original tires from when it was built back in 1956.
They are 4 ply tires and still have about 75 pounds of air in them.
Taking in to consideration how much this forklift weighs, I'm hesitant to drive it around very much with these old tires on it.
The Buckley Tractor show is in about 12 days so I've decided to go ahead and change the tires now so I don't end up with one or more blown out tires at the show.

I got a set of tires off ebay that are 6 ply tires and are rated to hold 730 pounds weight each at 90 pounds air pressure.
The inner tubes are specifically for fork lifts and are thicker than normal and have metal valve stems.

129_zps49609510.jpg


Fortunately, I still have a vice mounted on the workbench in the basement.
I used this to break the tire bead away from the rim.
This turned out to be quite a job on these old tires.

The back vice jaw is set against the rim and the front jaw on the tire.
Then I close the vice and am able to get the tire bead to move about 1/4 inch and that is all the farther it would go.
Then I would have to loosen the vice and rotate the tire a little and clamp the vice in again.
After 3 or 4 times of doing this, the tire bead would finally break loose then I would have to turn the tire around and repeat the process on the other tire bead.

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Once both tire beads were broken loose, I then unbolted the 5 bolts that held the two wheel halves together.

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Here is the first tire ready to go back on the forklift.

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Altogether, it took me almost 5 hours to take the 4 tires off, change them and put them back on the forklift.

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#37 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted August 22, 2014 - 01:51 PM

We took the forklift to the Buckley Old Engine Show last week and there were a lot of people looking at it and asking questions.

The engine was making a rattling noise from the lower end so I pulled the main bearing plate off the right side.
The crankshaft bearing was pitted and I went ahead and replaced that bearing before the show.
At that time, I didn't have enough time to pull the crankshaft out and change the bearing on the left side.

This week I have removed the engine and changed the crankshaft bearing on the left side.


Here are some photos of the forklift with out the engine.
I don't have the equipment here to sand this down and re-paint it so all it is getting right now is cleaned up some.

129_zps2a247ec7.jpg

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This is a simple but effective little machine with hydrostatic drive on the rear wheels that is powered by two V-belts.
The hydraulic control for the forks is a compact unit that sets on top of the rear axle and is driven by one V-belt.

131_zps14fc8b1a.jpg


Getting the engine mounted back in place today.
There is a 5/16 stud in the right front corner of the oil pan that is used to pull the engine forward and makes it real easy to get the correct tension on the V-belts.

132_zpsdb699cb6.jpg


Edited by jdcrawler, August 22, 2014 - 01:52 PM.

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#38 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 22, 2014 - 06:02 PM

Darned cute and effective machine. Wish today's engineers would take a peek and realize there aren't any electronics on it and its still working 50+ years later.
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#39 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted August 23, 2014 - 05:19 PM

I'm guessing that it probably has the capacity to lift to 6' or so, but I'd REALLY be concerned about the stability with a load that high.

 

The wheel track seems to be pretty narrow, and when you get the center of gravity up high it could be very easy to tip it over.

 

I know that it has 'forks' on it, but it's NOT a forklift.  It's a material handler, and trying to use it for something it wasn't designed for could very well lead to problems.

 

Besides, it's totally cool the way it is, and any modifications would ruin the collector value.


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#40 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted August 23, 2014 - 06:38 PM

....... Besides, it's totally cool the way it is, and any modifications would ruin the collector value.

 

Actually, I have been reconsidering this since the Buckley Show.

I was surprised at just how many people stopped to look at this during the show and I'm seriously thinking of restoring this back to it's original condition.

 

Before I bought this, I had been collecting parts to build a small forklift and I like the size and simple design of this unit.

 

I already have the small lift boom and forks.   

My wife's uncle gave me a hydrostatic rear axle out of a 1989 John Deere 175 that could easily be set up just like the drive axle on this forklift.

I have a Wisconsin 2-cylinder engine  and lots of  hydraulic stuff so it wouldn't take me very long to build a unit like this to use up in the loft.

Apart from the steel for the frame, about the only thing that I would still have to get would be a pair of boat trailer spindles and hubs for the front axle.


Edited by jdcrawler, August 23, 2014 - 06:40 PM.

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#41 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted August 23, 2014 - 10:18 PM

Actually, I have been reconsidering this since the Buckley Show.

I was surprised at just how many people stopped to look at this during the show and I'm seriously thinking of restoring this back to it's original condition.

 

That was basically my experience when I took my 1886 with the forklift attachment on it to two shows here in Ohio.  Lots of comments on how cool it was and how useful it could be.

 

Before I bought this, I had been collecting parts to build a small forklift and I like the size and simple design of this unit.

 

I already have the small lift boom and forks.   

My wife's uncle gave me a hydrostatic rear axle out of a 1989 John Deere 175 that could easily be set up just like the drive axle on this forklift.

I have a Wisconsin 2-cylinder engine  and lots of  hydraulic stuff so it wouldn't take me very long to build a unit like this to use up in the loft.

Apart from the steel for the frame, about the only thing that I would still have to get would be a pair of boat trailer spindles and hubs for the front axle.

 

Since you have most of the parts parts and skill, I'd definitely go this route.  Keep the Xpediter original. 


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#42 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted August 29, 2014 - 11:22 AM

Sometimes forgetting one little thing can really mess you up. ............

I got everything bolted back on the engine this week.
When I started it up, the bearing noise is gone but there is a knock in the engine that sounded like the rod was loose.
So I pulled the side bearing plate off and the nuts on the rod are tight and I can't feel any slop in the fit of the rod on the crank.

My next thought was that it could possibly be piston slap or a worn wrist pin, so I pulled the piston out.

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Turns out that this engine has been rebuilt.
The piston is .010 oversize and the crankshaft has been ground to fit a .010 undersize rod.
The piston diameter is well within specifications and there isn't any slop in the wrist pin to the piston or the rod.

The cylinder looks smooth and shiny without any scratches in it and there is absolutely no ridge at the top.

134_zpsa3b54bf4.jpg


Okay, now what. .. There was a definite hard knock when it was running and it has to be coming from somewhere ?   
I bolted the side bearing plate back on the engine and rotated the crank around by hand with the pulley shaft.
There is a very light "click" when the crank was rotated back and forth.
So I put a vice-grip on the end of the crankshaft so I could get more force on it to rotate the crank back and forth harder.
BINGO .. the hard knock shows up and it is coming from the flywheel side.

The threads for the pulley on the flywheel side were stripped out.
Someone had tapped threads into the end of the crank for a bolt to hold the pulley on.
When I had this apart the first time, I put a hardened stud in the end of the crank with lock-tight on the threads and a lock nut.

135_zps4abb5904.jpg


The pulley has been drilled and tapped for a set screw to tighten it on the shaft.
There was a thick serrated lock washer in between the end of the pulley and the flywheel.

136_zps8c0ade2a.jpg

I had forgotten to re-install that serrated lock washer when I had put the engine back together !!!

I put the lock washer back in place and tightened everything back down and the knock is gone.
Apparently the stripped threads on the crank only allow the pulley to go on just so far.
Without the tension of the lock washer, the flywheel was loose on the tapered shaft of the crank and created the hard knocking noise.

137_zps5bc0414e.jpg


I have ordered new piston rings and a head gasket so I won't be able to get this engine running again until sometime next week.


Edited by jdcrawler, August 29, 2014 - 11:26 AM.

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#43 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 29, 2014 - 11:45 AM

Wow, I feel for you Ray, been in those or similar shoes.
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#44 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted August 29, 2014 - 11:58 AM

Glad you found the issue.

 

Not sure if it's the picture angle, but that is one long rod!


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#45 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted August 29, 2014 - 01:02 PM

One nice thing about taking this all apart is that I now know that the engine is in real good condition.

Besides it gives me something extra to work on for a few days.


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