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My Dump Truck Is Broken


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#1 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 10:40 AM

[attachment=119338:577572_10151149807342738_818972737_13541584_794297998_n.jpg]

 

About three weeks ago I went to pick up a bucket of chicken and on the way home I blew a rear brake cylinder.  After hauling tons of soil, manure, rock, and leaves, it was a bucket of chicken that broke my truck.

 

The truck has a floating axle, so you have to pull the axles out to pull the brake drums.  I have no indoor place to work that allows three feet on each side to pull the axles, so I had to do it in my driveway. , Also, I don't have the proper tool for the nuts on the axle, so I have to do that old farmer thing with a punch and a hammer.  I did try to buy the proper tool while I was buying parts but apparently nobody sells them anymore. I got the bad side apart, saw that somebody had replaced the shoes and turned the drum not too long ago, since both are in good shape, and went and ordered two brake cylinders and picked up new brake lines.

 

 

 

My thinking is that you might as well fix it all while it's apart.  I didn't finish taking it all apart though, thinking I'd leave everything until the parts came.

 

So the parts showed up and it started to rain.  And rain.  And rain.  When it wasn't raining, the space under the truck was a puddle.  There was nothing I could do but tie garbage bags over the axles to keep everything dry.  Ten days passed and finally I could do the work. 

 

I tried to remove the cylinders.  The bolts were rusted solid.

 

Now, you think you have a ton of room to work under there, right?  Just hoist the box up, put a steel bar in so it can't fall and kill you, put a can of beer on the truck frame and get to work. Except the springs are right there so you can't get anything in to grab the bolts, and you can't get a grinder in.  I really didn't want to damage the backing plate either, so I had to be careful.  So it was hours of chiseling and grinding with a Dremel.  Those are hard bolts.  Through all this, my arthritis started acting up, so I had to keep stopping and walking around so my knees wouldn't seize up.

 

I finally got them out though and put in the new cylinders and brake line.

 

While I was putting in the brake line, I noticed the plate that holds the u-bolts to the axles looked cracked.  I tapped it with a 3/8 wrench and the crack widened.  "This is bad," I said to myself.  I pulled the u-bolts and looked at the plate.  By the rust and corrosion, it had been cracked for a while.  Likely a long while.

 

I had the next day off, so I spent a morning touring the spring places and auto-parts stores.  Nobody had a plate and nobody was willing to order one.  There must be something about suspension work that makes people apathetic and rude.   I tried one last spring place, way down in the stabbiest part of town, and they knew what it was and where to get it.  And they were polite and helpful.  If you need suspension work in Winnipeg, go to Standard on the corner of Higgins and King.

 

So I ordered two plates and new u-bolts.  Might as well do both sides while I have everything apart right?

 

The parts aren't in yet, so I'm waiting for them.  Maybe Monday or Tuesday.

 

After I ordered the parts I came home and looked at the tires.  You know how it is, you're just walking by and suddenly your staring at them.  They are weather checked and worn out.  They are 16" bias ply's that somebody shoehorned onto 16-1/2" inch split rims.  They are dangerous.  

 

I've been thinking about replacing them since I bought the truck, but I've been letting it slide, since the fronts are okay.  I went and toured the junkyards.  No eight bolt chevy rims that aren't already beat to death or rusted away.

 

So I went and ordered two new tires on new rims.  Thought I might get a break on the price since we get all of our work tires fixed/replaced there and use their mobile service at least once a week. I was right.  He gave me 10% off.  I gave him about half a paycheque.

 

Today, I guess I'll paint the hubcaps back to white.  The previous owner painted them green, and it just grates on me.

 

 


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#2 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 12:51 PM

We've probably all had stories like this.  Seems its always a good thing, though, to get 'er all fixed while your fixing.

 

Ben W.


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#3 petrj6 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 12:54 PM

  Arent trucks great!!!!!!!!!!!!  I have a 78 1 ton chevy out behind the barn.  Great truck I love it to death but it need work all the time,  I now have the entire front end torn of and am waiting for the time to replace the cab. 

                                                                                    Pete


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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 01:14 PM

It is always something!! But you will have more confidence in the truck once you have it fixed.
Back shortly after I got out of school my dad was doing snow removal work for a supermarket.
They had a flat roof canopy where people drove up to pick up their groceries and it had tons of snow on it.
We got up on it and started scooping snow into dads 1 1/2 ton GMC dump truck. We got a load on it and dad took off to dump it.
As he was turning out into the street there was a popping like an auto loading rifle going off.
It sheared off all the axle retainer bolts.
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#5 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 01:27 PM

Sounds like a pretty normal day to me,, but then again I work on big trucks for a living.


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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 04:35 PM

Great story. It looks like the truck will survive and be better than ever. Your bank account must be taking a beating though. When ever a project of mine blows up like that I always think of what it would cost if I had payed someone else to do the work. That usually makes me feel better. 


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#7 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 04:55 PM

 

 

 

 

Today, I guess I'll paint the hubcaps back to white.  The previous owner painted them green, and it just grates on me.

Uuumh. . .  While you had the box up, did you look at the lift cylinder?


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#8 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 10:10 PM

I used to play with early 50's and 60's trucks to restore and drive, up to 2-ton versions. There is a spring and suspension place by me that has been in business for long time and you can get lots of stuff there, not avail at any stores elsewhere. Wheel cylinders are hardest to find for older stuff and expensive when you do. They have services for re-sleeving, but have never tried that, as always found the parts somewhere. Those big sockets for the hubs should be at good store, just need to measure across nut for size. Usually a heavy metal with strap accross for the wrench to fit in and you are good to go. Might be $20 or so for one that size, but worth it. Hope the lock tabs were good to reuse, that is sometimes an issue and never found new ones of those. Don't crank that inner nut too hard, just the outer one and lock it.


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#9 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 10:32 PM

Great story. It looks like the truck will survive and be better than ever. Your bank account must be taking a beating though. When ever a project of mine blows up like that I always think of what it would cost if I had payed someone else to do the work. That usually makes me feel better. 

Actually, parts have been pretty reasonable.  The wheel cylinders were $15 each and the lines were under $20.  Not sure what the plates and u-bolts will be.  The wheels and tires were a killer, but they are always are.


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#10 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 10:34 PM

Uuumh. . .  While you had the box up, did you look at the lift cylinder?

I check the cylinders and lines every time I have the box up.  So far, so good.  



#11 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 10:56 PM

I used to play with early 50's and 60's trucks to restore and drive, up to 2-ton versions. There is a spring and suspension place by me that has been in business for long time and you can get lots of stuff there, not avail at any stores elsewhere. Wheel cylinders are hardest to find for older stuff and expensive when you do. They have services for re-sleeving, but have never tried that, as always found the parts somewhere. Those big sockets for the hubs should be at good store, just need to measure across nut for size. Usually a heavy metal with strap accross for the wrench to fit in and you are good to go. Might be $20 or so for one that size, but worth it. Hope the lock tabs were good to reuse, that is sometimes an issue and never found new ones of those. Don't crank that inner nut too hard, just the outer one and lock it.

Yeah, the lock tabs were good.  I had to kind of guess at the torque on the nuts since I was using a hammer and punch, but they should be alright.  They spin freely.  I think those bearings would be a machine-shop job to replace, so I don't want to damage them.



#12 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 11:03 PM

Those new brake lines... I have seen them go to pot in a year. Last time I did lines, I steel wooled the whole thing and painted it well, even touched up after assembly.
Still, only three years later & they were rusty to the point that they should've been replaced if it weren't leaving to be a farm truck.

#13 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 11:42 PM

I'll have to keep an eye on that, MH.  I've never had a problem before, but I haven't had to change lines for about 10 years either.


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#14 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2014 - 06:05 AM

I'll have to keep an eye on that, MH.  I've never had a problem before, but I haven't had to change lines for about 10 years either.

Spray them with some sort of rust preventer like Rust Check, Fluid Film or Crown. If done once a year they will not rust. It also makes it easier to work on the under side of a vehicle if the bolts aren't rusted and seized. 


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#15 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2014 - 06:36 AM

I picked up four Chevy 16" eight bolt rims a yard sale a couple of years ago for $20 for the four.  I was going to weld them together for a mail box post but was told that here in Michigan the post can't be stronger than a 4 X 4 post or if someone hits it and gets hurt by it they can sue you.  Still laying out in the scrap pile.






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