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#1 alleyyooper OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 06:56 AM

I have heard of such happenings but have never had it happen to me. We only have two colonies here at home and one has a boughten queen that turns out to have been a waste of money I find after yesterdays inspection.

After doing the inspection I go up to the garage to work on the trailer jack I needed to replace the mount on. I just get the old mount off and hear a lot of buzzing behind me. Turn around and see a swirling mass of bees coming from the south way more than I think is in both hives together we have to the east,
I have a stack of hive bodies with frames of comb stacked by the solar melter to get recycled and they chose a double stack and moved right in. Whole process lasted about 45 minutes.

Just went out real early this morning and place some good stuff on them. Once they get good and settled in I will mess with them and move them.

 

:D   Al
 


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#2 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 07:17 AM

 We only have two colonies here at home and one has a boughten queen that turns out to have been a waste of money I find after yesterdays inspection.

 

 

:D   Al
 

Can you elaborate on this? You buy an individual queen? What was she not doing? Doesn't a hive create it's own queen?


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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 07:42 AM

Word of your hospitality is spreading. :rolling:

Glad they found a good home.
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#4 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 12:10 PM

Word of your hospitality is spreading. :rolling:

Glad they found a good home.

 

Yep, they're flocking to "Al's Bee-yootiful Resort"!  


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#5 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 01:32 PM

Can you elaborate on this? You buy an individual queen? What was she not doing? Doesn't a hive create it's own queen?

a hive will create several queens, and at a time of high population, some of them leave and take followers with them, to start a new hive.


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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 02:44 PM

Boy I miss keeping bees! About 18 yrs ago I moved to town and had no place to keep them.
They could keep me watching them for hours on end.
I still have the supers but would need to buy a new veil, gloves, hive tool and smoker and of course the bees.
It takes some good management to keep them from swarming. So long as you have a good producing queen you have to find the new queen cells and destroy the new queen or once mature the hive will divide. You also need to keep adding supers so they have room to expand and not get crowded.
The guy that taught me died this year, he was one of the best in the state and won awards every year at county and state fairs.
I hope to get a couple hives started next spring

Edited by JD DANNELS, July 12, 2014 - 02:46 PM.

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#7 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 09:12 PM

That's really neat stuff. I would be scared of the bees!

#8 alleyyooper OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2014 - 04:39 AM

Yes you can buy individual queens. They cost from as low as 20.00 for a open bred to over 100.00 for a artificially bred breeder queen.

They come several ways, A JZBZ plastic cage with a queen and some workers some times. the neck part I am holding is filled with a candy the bees eat away to release the queen. When you order several at once they come in a battery box with several of the JZBZ cages and loose workers that service all the queens. Inside the card board box is a holder for several cages. I used to get them UPS over nite after I tried our local post office with over night service but found they could not read live bees on the package so carried them around all day in the carriers hot care instead of calling me to come to the post office and pick them up.

 they some times come in a Benton 3 hole cage that has candy in the end with a cork over that. I put the finish nails in the side of the cage to hold it in place after I pull the cork so the workers can eat the candy away to release the queen.

Some times I make a push in cage and release the queen into it for a few days so I don't have to search for her.

 

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I started raising our own queens in 2004. Used the cell punch method to get the eggs. Had a special yard where we raised drones to mate with our queens when they were ready.

We lost that mating yard  in 2012/13 winter. Still had a lot of drones in other places to mate queens but last winters losses were bad and the wife didn't feel we had enough bees left to properly mate queens. So we buy queens not properly mated.

 

:D   Al


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#9 alleyyooper OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2014 - 05:24 AM

SWARMING :

This is natures way of increasing the honey bee population. When a colony be it in a bee keepers yard or a hollow tree in the woods starts to get to crowded the workers make queen cells several, many and a bunch.  I don't for some reason a good queen cell picture.

Any how as the first of the new queens are hatching out of there cells the old queen and about half the bees in the colony take off. Queens have not flown for a long time so they get tired rather quickly and will land some place. Many of the other bees will surround her to keep her safe. They are not dangerous then either, as my grand daughter says.  I have gotten them from Home Depot in town twice as the home office in Atlanta GA. has my name on record of a swarm remover. I am also listed on several places on the internet, fire department, police department, Animal control office, USDA office, county extension office and several pest control companies since in Michigan if you kill a swarm your breaking the law. Many ways of getting them in a hive. Some times if the swarm is at the right level you just set a hive under them and they march right in.  Some times they are not to high up maybe 10 feet and it is clear so I have a bucket on a pole Do the snap thing that shakes them in the bucket and I pull the rope to close the lid then pour them in a hive. One was 35 feet up in a tree so I set my 10 ft step ladder in the back of a pick up and used a extendable paint pole with the clear suction hose and the bee vac to suck them out of the tree.

 

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Swarms can take on many shapes and be in some crazy places.

 

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this one was about 40 feet up in the tree could not reach it so used a 12 ga. shot gun to shoot the limb off the tree behind the swarm. the swarm fell as a they were and nearly hit the hive body I had set below then marched right in.

 

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So if you see a swarm call a bee keeper to come get them. Do an internet search for a bee keeper in your area that collects them. Used to be till 2010 a bee keeper in Ohio that kept a list for all 50 states and some of Canada.

 

:D   Al


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#10 alleyyooper OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2014 - 05:34 AM

We have colony's in several out yards away from home, When I find a queen cell in the hive I have to decide if the workers are trying to replace a failing queen or getting set to swarm.

Usually you can figure that out with a good inspection brood laying pattern eggs in cells and id the hive roaring with bees or not. That takes a long time and doesn't solve any thing so I decided many years ago it is fruitless to decide they are getting ready to swarm then cut the cells out. Seems a few or at least one is missed. Policy now is to find the queen and put her and half the bees in a new hive that is closed up and move them to a new yard.  One of the queen cells will then hatch go around and sting to death all the other non hatched queens in cells and fight any others that have hatched to the death. The one remaining queen them will take her mating flight. The bee keeper didn't loose all the bees that would have swarmed off to some unknown place by doing a artificial swarm.

 

:D   Al


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